Photography Posing Secrets by Malcolm Boone

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Photography Posing Secrets is a fantastic guide written by Malcolm Boone revealing some of the most powerful techniques you can apply to your photography for instant approval.A quick look at the contents will tell you just what is in the book:-SEVEN TIPS FOR BETTER PORTRAITS-THE IDEAL KIT-TYPES OF PORTRAIT-FORMAL PORTRAITS-LIFESTYLE PORTRAITS-ENVIRONMENTAL PORTRAITS-GROUP SHOTS-BABIES AND CHILDREN-POSING YOUR MODEL-IMPROVE YOUR PORTRAITS WITH PHOTOSHOP-PRINTING YOUR PORTRAITS-USING PHOTOSHOP-USING A PHOTO LAB-ALTERNATIVE PRESENTATION METHODS-FRAMINGPlease download this free book and recommend it to all your photography friends.

Text of Photography Posing Secrets by Malcolm Boone

Secrets of Better PortraitsBy

Malcolm Boonehttp://www.photographyposingsecrets.com

Proudly brought to you by Geoff Beattiehttp://www.creativephotoshop.co.uk/

Secrets of Better Portraits Please Read This First You do have permission to pass this book on to others as long as you a) do not change the contents b) do not misrepresent the book c) do not attempt to distribute the book using SPAM.

Important Disclaimer The author, publishers and marketers of this information disclaim any loss or liability, either directly or indirectly as a consequence of applying the information presented herein, or in regard to the use and application of said information. No guarantee is given, either expressed or implied, in regard to the merchantability, accuracy, or acceptability of the information.

Although the ideas given in this book are offered in good faith and after extensive research, no responsibility can be accepted for any consequences arising out of the use of this book or from any inaccuracies, omissions or errors.

Reading beyond this point constitutes acceptance of the above.

Secrets of Better Portraits is 2010 Malcolm Boone

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Secrets of Better Portraits

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION......................................................................................4 SEVEN TIPS FOR BETTER PORTRAITS..........................................5 THE IDEAL KIT........................................................................................7 TYPES OF PORTRAIT ...........................................................................9 FORMAL PORTRAITS.................................................................................9 LIFESTYLE PORTRAITS ............................................................................10 ENVIRONMENTAL PORTRAITS .................................................................11 GROUP SHOTS .....................................................................................12 BABIES AND CHILDREN....................................................................15 POSING YOUR MODEL.......................................................................17 IMPROVE YOUR PORTRAITS WITH PHOTOSHOP.....................19 PRINTING YOUR PORTRAITS ..........................................................21 USING PHOTOSHOP.................................................................................21 USING A PHOTO LAB ..............................................................................22 ALTERNATIVE PRESENTATION METHODS ..............................................23 FRAMING ................................................................................................24

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Secrets of Better Portraits

IntroductionThere are over six billion people in the world. Each could be a subject for a portrait photographer. Of all the photographs taken each day, the vast majority include images of people. Yet only a small fraction of these are true portraits.

A good portrait is described as a picture with a quality image that captures both the physical features and character of the subject. To produce a good portrait you have to be familiar with your camera and the other equipment you need to produce a good image. You have to know the techniques of producing a good portrait. You have to be able to interact with people so that they will reveal some aspect of their character for the camera.

This may suggest that only photographers with a long list of skills and abilities are capable of good portraiture. However, there are some easy steps any photographer can take to improve the quality and range of their portraits.

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Secrets of Better Portraits

Seven Tips for Better Portraits1. If there is not enough light indoors for your portrait shot change location, wait until its brighter, or use professional studio lighting. Do not use your cameras pop-up flash as this can destroy atmosphere. Only use your cameras built in flash for exterior fillin.

2. Focus your camera on your subjects eyes. When people look at a person, even in a photograph, they tend to look at the eyes. Focus on the nearest eye when taking a three-quarter shot.

3. Even if your camera is locked to a tripod your stationary subject can still move. Use at least 1/60sec shutter speed and preferably 1/125sec for a blur-free portrait. If you need a slower shutter speed either open the aperture or increase the ISO rating.

4. Make sure the background is not too cluttered or busy. The subject should be the focus of the picture. Keep distractions to a minimum. Also check that there is nothing behind the subject that could ruin the shot. No one looks their best with a lampshade apparently balanced on the top of their head or with a tree growing out of their shoulder. Also check the background if the subject is holding an object. I once saw a school textbook photo of a girl holding a test tube with a distant pupils head lined up with the top of the tube. They dont really do experiments on shrunken heads do they?

5. Crop the shot above or below body joints. Cropping at neck, knees or waist looks unnatural. If you are shooting digitally you could 5 Specially presented by www.creativephotoshop.co.uk

Secrets of Better Portraits sort this out with software, but doing it before you press the shutter button will save pixel memory and time.

6. Unless your subject has to be in the center of the shot try placing them to one side of the frame. It makes a more interesting picture.

7. The photo shoot should start when the subject is comfortable and at ease with his or her appearance and surroundings. Never shoot if the subject is tense or uneasy, because it will reflect in the pictures. There is no rule that says a conversation should stop when shooting starts; it can still continue especially if it makes the subject open up more to the photographer. Remember that the subject does not need to smile to make the portrait look good. Oftentimes, a thoughtful or a serious expression is preferred since it reveals more of the subject's character.

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Secrets of Better Portraits

The Ideal KitFirstly let me point out the title of this chapter. We are talking about the ideal kit for taking portraits. If you use a film camera or a digital compact you can still produce great results. However a digital SLR gives you excellent control over depth of field, shutter speeds and ISO settings. This gives you flexibility in focus and different lighting levels.

Ideally you should have two lenses. One with a focal length of about 50mm is ideal for half and full-length shots. You also want another lens of focal length 75-135mm for head and shoulders portraits. Please note these focal lengths are for 35mm film. A digital SLR will have a converter value. Multiply the focal length by the converter value to get the focal length you need. The converter value for Minolta, Nikon and Pentax is x1.5, Olympus is x2, and the converter for Canon cameras depends on the model, but varies between x1 and x1.6. Essentially you need a lens between 50mm and 100mm on the zoom after converting.

Most compact cameras have the correct range of focal lengths for portraiture. If you have a basic point and shoot model with some scene modes, use the portrait settings and turn the flash off. If you can, switch your compact to aperture priority and reduce the aperture to the lowest f number.

A tripod reduces the possibility of camera shake and releases you from behind the camera. This enables you to move around more, perhaps stepping forward to adjust your sitter or group, or making your subject feel more at ease. A tripod also keeps the subject accurately framed while you adjust lighting, backdrop, or other elements. 7 Specially presented by www.creativephotoshop.co.uk

Secrets of Better Portraits

Another piece of useful kit is the reflector. Ideally you want a doublesided circular 20in collapsible model with white and silver or gold surfaces to reflect light where you need it. There are stands for clamping the reflector in place, but the model can hold the reflector if you just need some light from below for head and shoulder shots. A correctly positioned model and reflector can make all the difference to your portraits and are definitely worth the investment.

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Secrets of Better Portraits

Types of PortraitWhatever type of portrait you are shooting, remember you are in charge. You should have a particular effect in mind and be able to direct the subject in terms of background, posing, and props. You should also be ready with answers if your subject asks about different locations, lighting effects, clothes and accessories, etc. Show your subject you have thought this through and you will start gaining their confidence and enable them to relax a little. Ideally your camera should be set up in advance, or at least you should have a very good idea of the apertures, shutter speeds and other technical variables you are going to use so you can concentrate on arranging the subject. There are essentially three styles of portrait shot. Each shows something different about the subject.

Formal Portraits

Usually this is a head and shoulders or half-shot with a simple background that does not distract you from your subject. Lighting is usually diffused and hits the subject at about 45 degrees. If you are using light from a window and it seems too harsh, try placing sheets of tracing paper over the panes to diffuse the light.

Seat or stand your subj