1
547 Vienna.-In consequence of the illness of Professor I Kahler, his assistant, Dr. Krpus, is delivering his lectures. DEATHS OF EMINENT FOREIGN MEDICAL MEN. B THE deaths of the following distinguished members of the medical profession abroad have been announced :- Dr. Kopp, Professor of Chemistry in Heidelberg.-Dr. Moritz Altmann of Berlin, at the age of seventy-seven.-Dr. Vailhe, formerly professeitr agrlg6 in Montpelier.-Dr. Francisco de P. Campa, Professor of Midwifery and Gynaecology in Barcelona.-Dr. Johann Wagner, Professor of Anatomy in the University of Kharkoff.-Dr. Barthez de Marmorieres, a French authority on children’s diseases, in his ninetieth year.-Dr. Hermann Aubert, Professor of Physiology in the University of Rostock. His investiga- tions covered a wide range, and included much zoological work, physiological optics, the action of the heart, &c. He also wrote a pamphlet own 11 Shakespeare as a Doctor." He had been on the Rostock staff since 1865, having migrated thence from Breslau. A MEETING of the Special Committee appointed at the request of the National Leprosy Fund to consider the report of the Leprosy Commissioners who have recently returned from India was held at the India Office on March lst. As our readers will remember, the College of Physicians deputed Sir Dyce Duckworth and Dr. Heron, and the College of Surgeons Mr. Hutchinson and Mr. Macnamara, as their representatives, the Hon. G. N. Curzon, M.P., and Mr. E. Clifford being the members nominated by the Fund. WE are informed that Frederick Needham, M.D. St. Andrews and Medical Superintendent of Barnwood Hos- pital for Insane, Gloucester, has been offered, and has accepted, the post of Commissioner in Lunacy, rendered vacant by the appointment of Dr. Thomas Clifford Allbutt as Regius Professor of Medicine to the University of Cam- bridge. - THE German Emperor has received the report of Pro- fessor von Bergmann on the building on the Langenbeck House, and has presented a bust of the late Empress Augusta, who was much interested in the enterprise and in medical affairs generally, as its first ornament. MR. WYNDHAM R. DUNSTAN, M.A., F.I.C., F.C.S., University Lecturer on Chemistry, Oxford, and Professor of Chemistry to the Pharmaceutical Society, has been appointed Lecturer on Chemistry at St. Thomas’s Hospital, in the place of the late Dr. Albert Bernays. Pharmacology and Therapeutics. DIURETIN. GHILLANY calls attention to the property possessed by diuretin of absorbing carbonic acid from the air and so becoming insoluble. He recommends that for dispensing purposes a solution of the drug in distilled water should be kept in well-stoppered bottles. SOLUBILITY OF SALICYLIC ACID. To increase the solubility of salicylic acid in water the addition of 1 part of acid to 100 parts of glycerine and 150 parts of water gives, it appears, the best results. This mix- ture is clear and miscible with water without any altera- tion. DERMATOL. Glaeser, in his second communication to the Centralbl. f. 5’K.., 1891, on the action of dermatol, gives it as his opinion hat it cannot take the place of iodoform. The latter gives especially good results in the treatment of suppurating wounds, with sloughing, whilst dermatol is recommended in the treatment of recent wounds caused by sharp instru.. ments, and in healthy cavities after suppuration. Dermabo is also useful in laparotomy, in operations for prolapsus uteri, and fistula, and is of great service in the treatment of ruptured perineum immediately after confinement, and in plugging the uterus. METHYLENE BLUE. A case of retinitis, due to acute Bright’s disease, has been treated successfully with this drug in France by Dr. Gilleb de Grandmont. He gave it to a patient whose urine con tained a considerable quantity of albumen, in doses of two, centigrammes three times a day. It caused a marked improvement, the renal symptoms abated, and the retinitis’ disappeared so rapidly that the sight was normal in four days. Was this a coincidence, or was the improvement due to the milk diet, which, in all the reported cases, has been strictly adhered to? Methylene blue is excreted by the kidney, and has the curious characteristic of turning the, urine a deep green. Dr. G. Paul proposes to take advan- tage of this property to produce a moral effect upon. hypochondriacs and malingerers. A dose of from five to ten centigrammes gives rise to decided colouration of the urines without causing any other symptom. EXALGIN IN CHOREA. Dr. Lowenthal, in a recent number of the Berliner Klin. Wochenschrift, publishes the results of the treatment 0:(1 chorea by this drug. Thirty-five cases were treated, and the results on the whole were good. In the majority of- instances it was found that the sooner treatment was com- menced after the onset of the illness the more rcfficacious. was the drug and the more rapid was recovery, but in a,. few bad cases, in spite of a regular use of the drug, the patient became worse for the first two weeks, but im- proved subsequently. No severe toxic symptoms were pro- duced, but in a few cases headache, malaise, and vomiting; followed, and in three there was distinct jaundice. The dose given was usually from one and a half to three grains,, and in most cases improvement followed after from sixty to, ninety grains in all had been administered. The conclusion. drawn is that exalgin, like many other drugs, is dficacious, in chorea, but that it has no specific action in this disease. SALOPHENE. Salophene, prepared by F. Bayer and Co., is a derivative. of salol. It is obtained by treating para nitrophenol with, salicylic acid, reducing the nitrophenol by means of zinc and hydrochloric acid into an amide, and acting upon this with acetic acid. Salophene contains about 50 per cent. of salicylic acid, and exists in the form of thin scales, taste- less, inodorous, and with a neutral reaction. It is almost* : insoluble in cold water, and only slightly so when warmed. Upon the addition, however, of an alkali it readily dis- I solves. It is very soluble in alcohol and ether. It burns’ , with a smoky flame, leaving no residue. In the stomach salophene breaks up into salicylic acid and acetyl-para- amido-phenol. These substances are excreted by the kidney, and can be found in the urine. Salophene, owing to the presence of amido-phenol, is less poisonous than salol. According to Guttmann, it is a valuable remedy in articular rheumatism, given in doses of from four to six grammes a day in pill or in the form of compressecL4 tablets. BLEMOL,AND HXMOGALLOL. Hsemol and bsemogallol of Merck, prepared according to> the directions of Kobert, are obtained from blood. Haemo1t is a brownish-black powder, and baemogallol a reddish- brown. The introduction of these substances into thera- peutics rests on the fact that the derivatives of the colouring: matter of blood, obtained by the action of reducing agents, have a hsematopoietic action both in health and disease. They are given in capsules in doses of from 0’1 to 0-5 gramme during the day. Healthy persons are able to take as much? as 1 to 5 grammes of bemogallol. Haemol contains traces of zinc left by design. The zinc is beneficial in slight, lesions of the stomach, which might result in ulcer. Given in the form of hsemol the zinc loses its caustic action, anc) does not cause nausea.

Pharmacology and Therapeutics

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Page 1: Pharmacology and Therapeutics

547

Vienna.-In consequence of the illness of Professor IKahler, his assistant, Dr. Krpus, is delivering his lectures.DEATHS OF EMINENT FOREIGN MEDICAL MEN. BTHE deaths of the following distinguished members of

the medical profession abroad have been announced :-Dr. Kopp, Professor of Chemistry in Heidelberg.-Dr. MoritzAltmann of Berlin, at the age of seventy-seven.-Dr.Vailhe, formerly professeitr agrlg6 in Montpelier.-Dr.Francisco de P. Campa, Professor of Midwifery and

Gynaecology in Barcelona.-Dr. Johann Wagner, Professorof Anatomy in the University of Kharkoff.-Dr. Barthez deMarmorieres, a French authority on children’s diseases, inhis ninetieth year.-Dr. Hermann Aubert, Professor of

Physiology in the University of Rostock. His investiga-tions covered a wide range, and included much zoologicalwork, physiological optics, the action of the heart, &c. He

also wrote a pamphlet own 11 Shakespeare as a Doctor." Hehad been on the Rostock staff since 1865, having migratedthence from Breslau.

A MEETING of the Special Committee appointed at therequest of the National Leprosy Fund to consider the reportof the Leprosy Commissioners who have recently returnedfrom India was held at the India Office on March lst. Asour readers will remember, the College of Physiciansdeputed Sir Dyce Duckworth and Dr. Heron, and theCollege of Surgeons Mr. Hutchinson and Mr. Macnamara,as their representatives, the Hon. G. N. Curzon, M.P., andMr. E. Clifford being the members nominated by the Fund.

WE are informed that Frederick Needham, M.D. St.Andrews and Medical Superintendent of Barnwood Hos-pital for Insane, Gloucester, has been offered, and has

accepted, the post of Commissioner in Lunacy, rendered vacantby the appointment of Dr. Thomas Clifford Allbutt as

Regius Professor of Medicine to the University of Cam-bridge. -

THE German Emperor has received the report of Pro-fessor von Bergmann on the building on the LangenbeckHouse, and has presented a bust of the late EmpressAugusta, who was much interested in the enterprise andin medical affairs generally, as its first ornament.

MR. WYNDHAM R. DUNSTAN, M.A., F.I.C., F.C.S.,University Lecturer on Chemistry, Oxford, and Professorof Chemistry to the Pharmaceutical Society, has beenappointed Lecturer on Chemistry at St. Thomas’s Hospital,in the place of the late Dr. Albert Bernays.

Pharmacology and Therapeutics.DIURETIN.

GHILLANY calls attention to the property possessed bydiuretin of absorbing carbonic acid from the air and sobecoming insoluble. He recommends that for dispensingpurposes a solution of the drug in distilled water should bekept in well-stoppered bottles.

SOLUBILITY OF SALICYLIC ACID.

To increase the solubility of salicylic acid in water theaddition of 1 part of acid to 100 parts of glycerine and 150parts of water gives, it appears, the best results. This mix-ture is clear and miscible with water without any altera-tion.

DERMATOL.

Glaeser, in his second communication to the Centralbl. f.

5’K.., 1891, on the action of dermatol, gives it as his opinionhat it cannot take the place of iodoform. The latter givesespecially good results in the treatment of suppuratingwounds, with sloughing, whilst dermatol is recommendedin the treatment of recent wounds caused by sharp instru..ments, and in healthy cavities after suppuration. Dermabois also useful in laparotomy, in operations for prolapsusuteri, and fistula, and is of great service in the treatment ofruptured perineum immediately after confinement, and inplugging the uterus.

METHYLENE BLUE.

A case of retinitis, due to acute Bright’s disease, has beentreated successfully with this drug in France by Dr. Gillebde Grandmont. He gave it to a patient whose urine contained a considerable quantity of albumen, in doses of two,centigrammes three times a day. It caused a markedimprovement, the renal symptoms abated, and the retinitis’disappeared so rapidly that the sight was normal in fourdays. Was this a coincidence, or was the improvement dueto the milk diet, which, in all the reported cases, has beenstrictly adhered to? Methylene blue is excreted by thekidney, and has the curious characteristic of turning the,urine a deep green. Dr. G. Paul proposes to take advan-tage of this property to produce a moral effect upon.hypochondriacs and malingerers. A dose of from five to tencentigrammes gives rise to decided colouration of the urineswithout causing any other symptom.

EXALGIN IN CHOREA.

Dr. Lowenthal, in a recent number of the Berliner Klin.Wochenschrift, publishes the results of the treatment 0:(1chorea by this drug. Thirty-five cases were treated, andthe results on the whole were good. In the majority of-instances it was found that the sooner treatment was com-menced after the onset of the illness the more rcfficacious.was the drug and the more rapid was recovery, but in a,.

few bad cases, in spite of a regular use of the drug, thepatient became worse for the first two weeks, but im-proved subsequently. No severe toxic symptoms were pro-duced, but in a few cases headache, malaise, and vomiting;followed, and in three there was distinct jaundice. Thedose given was usually from one and a half to three grains,,and in most cases improvement followed after from sixty to,ninety grains in all had been administered. The conclusion.drawn is that exalgin, like many other drugs, is dficacious,in chorea, but that it has no specific action in this disease.

SALOPHENE.

Salophene, prepared by F. Bayer and Co., is a derivative.of salol. It is obtained by treating para nitrophenol with,salicylic acid, reducing the nitrophenol by means of zincand hydrochloric acid into an amide, and acting upon thiswith acetic acid. Salophene contains about 50 per cent. ofsalicylic acid, and exists in the form of thin scales, taste-less, inodorous, and with a neutral reaction. It is almost*

: insoluble in cold water, and only slightly so when warmed.Upon the addition, however, of an alkali it readily dis-

I solves. It is very soluble in alcohol and ether. It burns’, with a smoky flame, leaving no residue. In the stomach

salophene breaks up into salicylic acid and acetyl-para-amido-phenol. These substances are excreted by the kidney,and can be found in the urine. Salophene, owing to thepresence of amido-phenol, is less poisonous than salol.According to Guttmann, it is a valuable remedy inarticular rheumatism, given in doses of from four to sixgrammes a day in pill or in the form of compressecL4tablets.

BLEMOL,AND HXMOGALLOL.

Hsemol and bsemogallol of Merck, prepared according to>the directions of Kobert, are obtained from blood. Haemo1tis a brownish-black powder, and baemogallol a reddish-brown. The introduction of these substances into thera-peutics rests on the fact that the derivatives of the colouring:matter of blood, obtained by the action of reducing agents,

have a hsematopoietic action both in health and disease.They are given in capsules in doses of from 0’1 to 0-5 grammeduring the day. Healthy persons are able to take as much?as 1 to 5 grammes of bemogallol. Haemol contains tracesof zinc left by design. The zinc is beneficial in slight,lesions of the stomach, which might result in ulcer. Givenin the form of hsemol the zinc loses its caustic action, anc)does not cause nausea.