of 2 /2
657 DR. TEJADA Y ESPANA. THE death is announced of Dr. Tejada y Espana, editor of El Genio Médico, one of the weekly medical journals published in Madrid. He began his career as a " third-class surgeon in the province of Burgos, and there became editor and proprietor of the Eco de los Cira janos. He afterwards went to Madrid and took the degree of Licentiate in Medi- cine, which was succeeded by that of Doctor. Of two older medical journals which he edited he founded the Genio, which is now in its thirty-second year. He wrote also a Compendium of Surgery and a well-known novel, "El Coche del Médico" " (" The Doctor’s Carriage "). He was an honorary member of a considerable number of foreign scientific societies. ___ FOREIGN MEDICAL APPOINTMENTS. PROFESSOR F. A. HopFMANN of Dorpat has been appointed to the charge of thd Leipsig Policlinic, vacated by Professor Strumpel, who has gone to Erlangen ; Professor Dr. Richard Wiedermann, the physicist, succeeds Professor Dorns. Pro- fessor Lommel of Erlangen has been appointed to the Chair of Experimental Physics at Munich. Dr. Otto Haab, assistant in the Ophthalmic Clinic, has been appointed to the Professorship of Ophthalmology at Zurich, vacated by Professor Horner. M. Wasseige, a professor in the Medical Faculty of the University of Liege, has been appointed Rector, and received quite an ovation from the medical students and from his colleagues. He was at the same time raised to the dignity of Officer of the Order of Leopold. A LARGE FEE AND A MUNIFICENT DONATION. WE understand that the sum of .65000 has been entrusted to Sir Andrew Clark by a lady as a donation to medical charities. This sum he has distributed as follows :- .62000 to the London Hospital; .61000 to the Medical College attached to that hospital; and S2000 to the Royal Medical Benevolent College. The presentation was preceded by the payment of a fee of X1500 to Sir Andrew in considera- tion of his absence from town for five days on a professional visit to this lady in the South of France. THE PASTEUR TREATMENT OF HYDROPHOBIA. THE Academia Medica di Roma on Sunday, March 28th, Professor Guido Baccelli presiding, held an animated dis- cussion on M. Pasteur’s method in hydrophobia. Opinion as to its efficacy was much divided, and the discussion was adjourned till April 4th, when a decision will be come to, and a report prepared for publication in the Academy’s official organ, the Bollettno. FROM the report of the examination made by Colonel Sir Francis Bolton of the water supplied by the several metro- politan water companies during the month of February, it appears that the Thames water sent out by the Chelsea, West Middlesex, Southwark, Grand Junction, and Lambeth Companies contained in every case less organic matter than was present in the January samples, and in none of the samples was the organic matter excessive for this season of the year. Of the water drawn from the Lea, that supplied by the New River Company contained less, and that by the East London Company more, organic matter than any of the other river waters. All the samples were clear and bright on delivery. - THE Senate of the University of Edinburgh has offered the honorary degree of LL.D. to Deputy Inspector-General F.. J. Mouat, M.D., F.R.G.S., &c. IN the Tliertcljc7aresschrift fiir Dermutolugie und Syphilis Professor J. Caspary, of Konigsberg, figures one of two children, aged respectively four years and a year and a half, affected with ichthyosis fcetalis. They were the children of cousins, and were prematurely born. There seems to be no doubt that the affection was congenital; but the state of the skin did not qaite correspond to that in the harlequin foetus lately shown, brought by Mr. Sutton to the Royal Medica and Chirurgical Society. There were, however, flexion of the limbs and genu valgum. Professor Caspary gives some interesting references to other cases, entirely, however, from German literature, and discusses the relation of the condition observed with that of the so-called harlequin foetus. THE Presse Médicale Be4ge announces that the Council of Administration of the University of Brussels has actually ratified "the deplorable decision" of the Faculty of Medicine,. which has the effect of depriving Professor Crocq of his chair of clinical medicine and of his examinership in the practical part of the examination for the M.D. degree. THE Government of Spain have information to the effect that suspicious cases of illness have occurred in the mining district of Bilbao, and that two cases have been pronounced to be cholera. A later account contains the usual denial, but it will be recollected that the disease prevailed in this locality late during the course of last autumn. THE Archduke Charles Theodore of Bavaria, who practises. medicine, has obtained permission from M. Pasteur to be- present at the inoculations in the laboratory of Rue d’Ulm. The Archduchess, who helps her husband in his professional labours, will accompany him as an assistant. If, THE Gresham Lectures will be delivered by Dr. Symes. Thompson on April 6th and three following days, the subject being the " Diseases of Infancy and Childhood." SCHROEDER’S Treatise on Diseases of the Female Genital Organs has just been translated into French by two Belgian physicians, MM. E. Lauwers and Hertoghe. Pharmacology and Therapeutics. IMPROVED GELATINE LAMELS. THESE lamels are prepared by Mr. Brownen and are- designed to meet the requirements of modern surgery and medicine. It is asserted that the lamels or discs are pre- pared with the purest gelatine and are so manufactured as to be free from every impurity, including fungi and germs Three of the lamels are now official in the British Pharma- copoeia of 1885-atropine, physostigmine, and cocaine. The lamels are made for use in ophthalmic surgery, as well as for hypodermic medication. The specimens that we have submitted to trial have answered their purpose admirably. The articles may be procured of Mr. Martindale, 10, New Cavendish-street, W. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND CLINICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ANTYPYRIN AND THALLIN. Our knowledge of the action of the new antipyretics is. receiving constant, we may almost say weekly, additions. One of the latest researches on these drugs is by Dr. Anseroff? and is reported in the Russian Medical Review for last month. The particular point to which he directed his investigations, which were conducted both in the laboratory and in the wards, was the effects of antipyrin and thallin on the vaso-motor apparatus both in the normal state and in fever cases. He employed for some of his experiments

Pharmacology and Therapeutics

  • Upload
    ngonhu

  • View
    213

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

657

DR. TEJADA Y ESPANA.

THE death is announced of Dr. Tejada y Espana, editorof El Genio Médico, one of the weekly medical journalspublished in Madrid. He began his career as a " third-classsurgeon in the province of Burgos, and there became editorand proprietor of the Eco de los Cira janos. He afterwardswent to Madrid and took the degree of Licentiate in Medi-cine, which was succeeded by that of Doctor. Of twoolder medical journals which he edited he founded theGenio, which is now in its thirty-second year. He wrotealso a Compendium of Surgery and a well-known novel,"El Coche del Médico" " (" The Doctor’s Carriage "). He wasan honorary member of a considerable number of foreignscientific societies.

___

FOREIGN MEDICAL APPOINTMENTS.

PROFESSOR F. A. HopFMANN of Dorpat has been appointedto the charge of thd Leipsig Policlinic, vacated by ProfessorStrumpel, who has gone to Erlangen ; Professor Dr. RichardWiedermann, the physicist, succeeds Professor Dorns. Pro-fessor Lommel of Erlangen has been appointed to the Chairof Experimental Physics at Munich. Dr. Otto Haab,assistant in the Ophthalmic Clinic, has been appointed tothe Professorship of Ophthalmology at Zurich, vacated byProfessor Horner. M. Wasseige, a professor in the MedicalFaculty of the University of Liege, has been appointedRector, and received quite an ovation from the medicalstudents and from his colleagues. He was at the same timeraised to the dignity of Officer of the Order of Leopold.

A LARGE FEE AND A MUNIFICENT DONATION.

WE understand that the sum of .65000 has been entrustedto Sir Andrew Clark by a lady as a donation to medicalcharities. This sum he has distributed as follows :-.62000 to the London Hospital; .61000 to the Medical Collegeattached to that hospital; and S2000 to the Royal MedicalBenevolent College. The presentation was preceded bythe payment of a fee of X1500 to Sir Andrew in considera-tion of his absence from town for five days on a professionalvisit to this lady in the South of France.

THE PASTEUR TREATMENT OF HYDROPHOBIA.

THE Academia Medica di Roma on Sunday, March 28th,Professor Guido Baccelli presiding, held an animated dis-cussion on M. Pasteur’s method in hydrophobia. Opinionas to its efficacy was much divided, and the discussion wasadjourned till April 4th, when a decision will be come to,and a report prepared for publication in the Academy’sofficial organ, the Bollettno.

FROM the report of the examination made by Colonel SirFrancis Bolton of the water supplied by the several metro-politan water companies during the month of February, itappears that the Thames water sent out by the Chelsea,West Middlesex, Southwark, Grand Junction, and LambethCompanies contained in every case less organic matter thanwas present in the January samples, and in none of thesamples was the organic matter excessive for this season ofthe year. Of the water drawn from the Lea, that suppliedby the New River Company contained less, and that by theEast London Company more, organic matter than any ofthe other river waters. All the samples were clear and

bright on delivery. -

THE Senate of the University of Edinburgh has offeredthe honorary degree of LL.D. to Deputy Inspector-GeneralF.. J. Mouat, M.D., F.R.G.S., &c.

IN the Tliertcljc7aresschrift fiir Dermutolugie und SyphilisProfessor J. Caspary, of Konigsberg, figures one of two children,aged respectively four years and a year and a half, affectedwith ichthyosis fcetalis. They were the children of cousins,and were prematurely born. There seems to be no doubtthat the affection was congenital; but the state of the skindid not qaite correspond to that in the harlequin foetuslately shown, brought by Mr. Sutton to the Royal Medicaand Chirurgical Society. There were, however, flexionof the limbs and genu valgum. Professor Caspary givessome interesting references to other cases, entirely, however,from German literature, and discusses the relation of thecondition observed with that of the so-called harlequin foetus.

THE Presse Médicale Be4ge announces that the Council ofAdministration of the University of Brussels has actuallyratified "the deplorable decision" of the Faculty of Medicine,.which has the effect of depriving Professor Crocq of hischair of clinical medicine and of his examinership in thepractical part of the examination for the M.D. degree.

THE Government of Spain have information to the effectthat suspicious cases of illness have occurred in the miningdistrict of Bilbao, and that two cases have been pronouncedto be cholera. A later account contains the usual denial,but it will be recollected that the disease prevailed in thislocality late during the course of last autumn.

THE Archduke Charles Theodore of Bavaria, who practises.medicine, has obtained permission from M. Pasteur to be-present at the inoculations in the laboratory of Rue d’Ulm.The Archduchess, who helps her husband in his professionallabours, will accompany him as an assistant.

If, THE Gresham Lectures will be delivered by Dr. Symes.Thompson on April 6th and three following days, the subjectbeing the " Diseases of Infancy and Childhood."

’ SCHROEDER’S Treatise on Diseases of the Female Genital

Organs has just been translated into French by two Belgianphysicians, MM. E. Lauwers and Hertoghe.

Pharmacology and Therapeutics.IMPROVED GELATINE LAMELS.

THESE lamels are prepared by Mr. Brownen and are-

designed to meet the requirements of modern surgery andmedicine. It is asserted that the lamels or discs are pre-pared with the purest gelatine and are so manufactured asto be free from every impurity, including fungi and germsThree of the lamels are now official in the British Pharma-

copoeia of 1885-atropine, physostigmine, and cocaine. Thelamels are made for use in ophthalmic surgery, as well asfor hypodermic medication. The specimens that we havesubmitted to trial have answered their purpose admirably.The articles may be procured of Mr. Martindale, 10, NewCavendish-street, W.

PHYSIOLOGICAL AND CLINICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ANTYPYRINAND THALLIN.

Our knowledge of the action of the new antipyretics is.receiving constant, we may almost say weekly, additions.One of the latest researches on these drugs is by Dr. Anseroff?and is reported in the Russian Medical Review for lastmonth. The particular point to which he directed hisinvestigations, which were conducted both in the laboratoryand in the wards, was the effects of antipyrin and thallinon the vaso-motor apparatus both in the normal state andin fever cases. He employed for some of his experiments

658

animals which were sufficiently under control not to requiretying-up, which of itself must exert some influence pre-judicial to the results. He found that antipyrin caused arincrease of blood-pressure and a decrease of the internaltemperature, as shown by a thermometer in the rectum ; buta considerable rise, sometimes as much as 12OC., in the ex-ternal temperature, that of the paw being generally takenThis rise of the temperature of the paw, however, did notoccur where the limb had been previously paralysed bydivision of the sciatic nerve, showing that the antipyrinacted as a stimulant to the vaso-dilator nerves through thevascular centre, the vaso-constrictors of the interiorbeing stimulated so that the tension remained abovethe normal. Similar results were given by experi-ments with thallin. With regard to the rise of tem-

perature which sometimes occurs after the exhibitionof considerable doses, Dr. Anseroff suggests that increasedioss of heat may induce augmented heat formation. Therise observed after thallin may be explained by the exhaus-tion of the apparatus which regulates the loss of heat.Clinical observations on fever patients present an analogousresult-viz., a lowering of the internal temperature going onside by side with an increase of the external temperature.Clinically, the following points concerning the two drugsshould be borne in mind. 1. With thallin the temperaturebegins to rise again two hours after the dose. 2. Very fre-quently a single four-grain dose of thallin produces a rigorwith a subsequent rise of temperature, sometimes abovethat which existed before the medicine was taken. 3. Withrespect to equal doses of the two drugs, thallin causes a moredecided reduction of temperature, but is much more likelyto produce a rigor with a subsequent rise. Antipyrinbehaves, in the author’s opinion, like hydro-therapeuticmeasures in improving the breathing, pulse, general feeling,and appearance of the patients.

PIPER MBTHYSTICUM (KAVA-EAVA).A substance, the active principle of kawa, appears to

possess more qualifications as a substitute for cocaine thaneither menthol or apomorphine, if we may speak thus frompurely experimental researches, the results of which M. Lewinof Berlin has recently collected in a brochure published byA. Hirschwald. The plant is already known to the medicalworld under the name of kava-kava; the root has beenused by the inhabitants of the Polynesian isles in the pre-paration of an intoxicating liquor which is their alcohol; itis also employed to check discharges from the urethra andother parts. Two crystallisable substances, kawahin andyankonin, have been separated from the root by Nolting andKopp. By agitating the root with petroleum ether M. Lewinhas extracted two resinous bodies: one (a) of these has agreenish-yellow tint and the odour of the plant; the’other (b) has a reddish-brown colour. A minute particle ofthe two resins, or of the first, placed on the tongue causes asensation of burning, which is followed by a certain degreeof anesthesia of the part touched. The anaesthetic effectis said to be well marked on the conjunctiva, and maybe prolonged for hours in guinea-pigs by renewing thefragment of resin from time to time; the eyes under-went no pathological alteration, only a slight dilatation ofthe palpebral fissure.. The introduction of minute quan-tities of the resin (a) under the skin of frogs producesmarked loss of sensibility, so that the animal takes nonotice of severe irritation of the affected part; ligature ofthe vessels of the limb experimented on made no differencein the result; the local anaesthesia continued to be local.Introduced into the subcutaneous tissue of rabbits theanaesthesia developed without any sign of inflammation.Kawa resin appears to exert a paralysing influence whenadministered in larger doses, and its effect in this regardis thought to be due to its action on the motor cells of theanterior horn of the spinal cord. Its first action is believedto be on the terminations of the sensory nerves. M. Lewinsuggests that it also destroys the conductivity of fibres,conveying painful impressions in the grey matter of thecord; and he also thinks it acts on the brain, causing sleep.

COCAINE.

A case has been recorded by Dr. Schilling in the Phar-maceutical Journal in which the injection of six drops of a20 per cent. solution of cocaine into the gums of a womanaged twenty-eight, to prevent the pain of extraction of amolar tooth, was followed after the extraction by sym-ptoms of which unconsciousness and rigid aspect of the face

3 were the chief. There was contraction of the retinal arteries,. as witnessed bythe ophthalmoscope. The inhalation of threel drops of amyl nitrite restored the patient to consciousness,I and it was considered probable that the brain was in the; same anaemic state as the retina. Dr. Bignon says that. cocaine, if it be pure, should be white, almost inodorous,. entirely soluble in three parts of alcohol, two parts of; sulphuric ether, in chloroform, in sulphide of carbon, and in.. twenty parts of tarzine, prepared either from tar or petro-. leum. According to him, also, the benzoate of cocaine is more, stable than the hydrochlorate, and is preferable in other ways.. Grunhagen and Berthold have ascertained that injections of

cocaine in moderate doses increase the blood-pressure, andthey believe that this result is to be attributed to an excita-tion of the vaso-motor centre, since it does not occur aftersection of the cervical swelling of the spinal cord. In largerdoses a fall in blood-pressure takes place, due to paralysis ofthe vaso-motor centre; in a curarised rabbit whose vagi werecut in the neck after having received a large dose of cocaine,with consequent lowering of the blood-pressure, stimulationof the saphenous nerve caused no augmentation of blood-pressure until the effect of the cocaine h,d passed off.

HOMERIANA.

A plant called Homeriana (Palygonum aviculare), whichis very common in Russia, and is used popularly as a drug,has been examined by Dr. Rotschinin and reported on in apaper read to the recent congress of Russian doctors. It hasbeen found by Werner to contain a large proportion ofalkaloid. A decoction, however, was used by Dr. Rotschinin,a tumblerful being given three times a day. It appeared tobe really valuable in several cases of bronchitis, two ofwhich were capillary; also in three cases of whooping-cough. It was tried ill phthisis but no definitely satis-factory results were obtained.

GRINDELIA ROBUSTA.

The action of grindelia robusta has been investigated byL. Grinivetski, his paper on the subject being published inthe RU8Ska.1Ja 1.’Jfeditsina. He found the liquid extract veryuseful in emphysematous asthma due to chronic bronchialcatarrh, the asthma diminishing after a few doses, and thecough and expectoration likewise becoming less. Hisprescription was-" a Inf. rad. senegse, zvi.; ext. grindel.robust.,5ij. t05iij.; syrup. glycyrrhizae, 15ss. Adessertspoonfulevery two hours till relief is obtained." It was found thatthe drug was useless in asthma due to other causes.

Public Health and Poor Law.LOCAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT.

REPORTS OF MEDICAL OFFICERS OF HEALTH.

Reading Urban District.-The death-rate for this boroughduring 1885 was 18’0 per 1000, and the zymotic rate 26.The inhabitants number somewhat over 42,000, and thepopulation per acre amounts to 22’4. Amongst the deathsfrom infectious diseases there welte 58 from measles, and 22from whooping-cough. In short, a large number werebeyond the present range of sanitary measures. But therewere 19 deaths from scarlet fever; and in the absence of aproper hospital for the reception of such cases, it appearsthat in two instances only was removal effected to the smallcottage at present available for isolation purposes. Diph-theria is known to have occurred in 21 cases, and 9 of theattacks proved fatal. Diarrhoea was, fortunately, almostentirely absent as a fatal disease. Sanitary work issteadily progressing; the houses still needing it are con-tinuously being connected with the new system of publicsewers, fresh bye-laws have just been finally dealtwith, and the imperfect system of hand Rushing towaterclosets has been replaced by cistern flushing in 236cases. But in 24 instances there is direct communi-cation between the closet pans and the water mains, and,knowing the extreme danger of this arrangement, Dr. Sheapresses for the abolition of all such connexions.

Kettering Urban District.-Mr. Dryland reports the con-dition of this district as remaining satisfactory, there havingbeen no epidemic, the general death-rate standing at 15 per1000, and the infant mortality having diminished. The