7
PEOPLE AND EVENTS Professor Emeritus Status to L. K. Crowe Dr. and Mrs. L. K. Crowe were honored at a dinner in the Nebraska Union on May 22 for their 42 years of service to the University of Nebraska. A native of Indiana, Dr. Crowe earned the B.S. degree from Colo- rado State University in 1922, the M.S. degree from the University of Nebraska in 1925, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Min- nesota in 1947. Dr. Crowe is best known as a teacher. His students hold re- sponsible positions in the United States and in many other countries. L. IK. Orowe He received the Univer- sity of Nebraska Dis- tinguished Teaching Award in 1958 and the Outstanding Service Plaque as advisor for the Fraternity of Alpha Zeta. In 1965 he was re- cipient of the Milk Industry Foundation Teach- ing Award, administered by the American Dairy Science Association. He was nominated for the Outstanding Nebraskan Award by uni- versity students in 1964. Dr. Crowe's service to the University began in 1924. He was research assistant and associ- ate professor until 1947 when he was promoted to professor. Before joining the Nebraska staff he was an inspector for the Colorado Dairy Commission, and assistant professor at Colorado State University. In addition to being an outstanding teacher, Dr. Crowe has contributed useful dairy pro- cessing procedures to the dairy industry. After two and one-half years of distinguished service, as associate chief and chief of an edu- cational exchange program in Turkey, he re- fused an offer from the Food and Agricultural Organization to continue overseas work, to re- sume teaching again in the University of Ne- braska. On June 30, Dr. Crowe will be assigned to the dean's office in the College of Agriculture and Home Economics to administer the foreign student training program. He also will assist the director of resident instruction. The Crowe's have two children, Mrs. Don Reeves of Central City, Nebraska, and Dr. Don- ald Crowe at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Professor Emeritus Status to V. N. Krukovsky Professor Vladinfir N. Krukovsky, noted for his research in the chemistry of milk, will re- tire after 33 years at Cornell University. He will become professor emeritus on June 30, 1967. He has been on the faculty of the Food Science Department at Cornell University since 1933. A native of the Black Sea resort city of Odes- sa in Russia, Dr. Kru- kovsky fled to the Uni- ted States in 1930. He then studied at Cornell, where he received his M.S. degree in 1934 and his Ph.D. in 1935. He had studied at the Polytechnic Institute of V. N. Krukovsky Prague, Czechoslovakia, where he received a de- gree in engineering in 1926. tie then served as research associate and consultant at this Insti- tute and Industrial Enterprises from 1926-29. During the Civil War in Russia, he fought against the communists as an artillery officer and in 1921 fled to Czechoslovakia through Turkey. Through his research a~ Cornell, Dr. Kru- kovsky brought about better understanding of the importance of milk fat globules and lipo- lytie activity of milk in influencing quality and stability of milk. His research also was concerned with the roles of vitamins A and E in nfilk fat and of copper in the development of off-flavors in milk. In recognition of his research accomplish- ments, the American Chemical Society conferred its 1961 Borden Award on Krukovsky. The award consisted of a gold medal and a $1,000 prize. In December, 1966, he was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advance- ment of Science. Since 1948, he has served on the Scientific, Liaison and Advisory Board of the Quartermaster Food and Container Insti- tute for the Armed Forces. In 1955, he took part in the preparation of tables on l)etoxieation Mechanism of Animals for the Handbook of Biological Data, published by the National Academy of Sciences and Na- tional Research Council. In addition to these organizations, he belongs to the New York Academy of Sciences, the American Dail3~ Science Association, Phi Kappa Phi, and Sigma Xi. He is author and co-author of nearly 100 scientific research papers dealing with bio- chemical properties of milk and milk products that affect their palatability and nutritive values. Using his spare time since 1953, Krukovsky has translated and abstracted more than 1,000 Russian scientific papers for Chemical Ab- stracts Service. He also is well versed in Czech, German, and French. He and his wife Josefa live at 1161/2 Heights

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Page 1: People and Events

P E O P L E A N D E V E N T S

Professor Emeritus Status to L. K. Crowe

Dr. and Mrs. L. K. Crowe were honored at a dinner in the Nebraska Union on May 22 for their 42 years of service to the University of Nebraska.

A native of Indiana, Dr. Crowe earned the B.S. degree from Colo- rado State University in 1922, the M.S. degree from the University of Nebraska in 1925, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Min- nesota in 1947.

Dr. Crowe is best known as a teacher. His students hold re- sponsible positions in the United States and in many other countries.

L. IK. Orowe He received the Univer- sity of Nebraska Dis-

tinguished Teaching Award in 1958 and the Outstanding Service Plaque as advisor for the Fraternity of Alpha Zeta. In 1965 he was re- cipient of the Milk Industry Foundation Teach- ing Award, administered by the American Dairy Science Association. He was nominated for the Outstanding Nebraskan Award by uni- versity students in 1964.

Dr. Crowe's service to the University began in 1924. He was research assistant and associ- ate professor until 1947 when he was promoted to professor. Before joining the Nebraska staff he was an inspector for the Colorado Dairy Commission, and assistant professor at Colorado State University.

In addition to being an outstanding teacher, Dr. Crowe has contributed useful dairy pro- cessing procedures to the dairy industry.

After two and one-half years of distinguished service, as associate chief and chief of an edu- cational exchange program in Turkey, he re- fused an offer from the Food and Agricultural Organization to continue overseas work, to re- sume teaching again in the University of Ne- braska.

On June 30, Dr. Crowe will be assigned to the dean's office in the College of Agriculture and Home Economics to administer the foreign student training program. He also will assist the director of resident instruction.

The Crowe's have two children, Mrs. Don Reeves of Central City, Nebraska, and Dr. Don- ald Crowe at the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

Professor Emeritus Status to V. N. Krukovsky

Professor Vladinfir N. Krukovsky, noted for his research in the chemistry of milk, will re- tire after 33 years at Cornell University. He

will become professor emeritus on June 30, 1967. He has been on the faculty of the Food

Science Department at Cornell University since 1933.

A native of the Black Sea resort city of Odes- sa in Russia, Dr. Kru- kovsky fled to the Uni- ted States in 1930. He then studied at Cornell, where he received his M.S. degree in 1934 and his Ph.D. in 1935.

He had studied at the Polytechnic Institute of

V. N. Krukovsky Prague, Czechoslovakia, where he received a de-

gree in engineering in 1926. t ie then served as research associate and consultant at this Insti- tute and Industrial Enterprises from 1926-29. During the Civil War in Russia, he fought against the communists as an artillery officer and in 1921 fled to Czechoslovakia through Turkey.

Through his research a~ Cornell, Dr. Kru- kovsky brought about better understanding of the importance of milk fat globules and lipo- lytie activity of milk in influencing quality and stability of milk. His research also was concerned with the roles of vitamins A and E in nfilk fat and of copper in the development of off-flavors in milk.

In recognition of his research accomplish- ments, the American Chemical Society conferred its 1961 Borden Award on Krukovsky. The award consisted of a gold medal and a $1,000 prize.

In December, 1966, he was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advance- ment of Science. Since 1948, he has served on the Scientific, Liaison and Advisory Board of the Quartermaster Food and Container Insti- tute for the Armed Forces.

In 1955, he took part in the preparation of tables on l)etoxieation Mechanism of Animals for the Handbook of Biological Data, published by the National Academy of Sciences and Na- tional Research Council.

In addition to these organizations, he belongs to the New York Academy of Sciences, the American Dail3~ Science Association, Phi Kappa Phi, and Sigma Xi.

He is author and co-author of nearly 100 scientific research papers dealing with bio- chemical properties of milk and milk products that affect their palatability and nutritive values.

Using his spare time since 1953, Krukovsky has translated and abstracted more than 1,000 Russian scientific papers for Chemical Ab- stracts Service. He also is well versed in Czech, German, and French.

He and his wife Josefa live at 1161/2 Heights

Page 2: People and Events

J O U R N A L OF D A I R Y S C I E N C E 3

Court, Ithaca. Their only son Nicholas is with an aircraft firm in Binghamton, N. Y., as an electrical engineer.

J. O. Young Appointed at South Dakota

Dr. James O. Young was appointed head of the Department of Dairy Science at South Da- kota State, effective July 1, 1967. Since 1962, he has been professor of animal science and

dairy extension spe- cialist at Purdue Uni- versity. From 1949- 1962 Dr. Young served as research assistant, in- structor, and assistant professor at Oregon State University where he earned the B.S. and M.S. degrees. The doc- torate was conferred by Washington State Uni- versity in 1960.

A native of Lee, Ore- J. O. Young gon, Dr. Young gradu-

ated from Riverton Union High School. He served four years in the U.S. Navy. He was recipient of a Sears- Roebuck Foundation Scholarship and Special Award.

Dr. Young is a member of Alpha Zeta, Sigma Xi and the American Dairy Science Association.

Borden Company Elects Vice-President

H a r r y F. Bremer was elected Vice-President of the Borden Company Foundation, effective Ju ly 1. He will continue as assistant treasurer

of the Borden Company, retaining executive re- sponsibility for the com- pany's employee benefit, and safety and loss- prevention programs in that post.

Mr. Bremer joined Borden's in 1934, serv- ing in the treasurer 's office. Following four years in the U.S. Navy, he returned to the com- pany in 1945 and one year later became em-

il . F. Bremer ployment supervisor in the employee relations

department. In 1947, Mr. Bremer was named supervisor of group insurance and in 1952 was appointed manager of the company's em- ployee benefit programs. He has been assistant treasurer since 1962. He will supervise the company's educational relations program, which includes sponsorship of annual Borden Awards for distinguished research.

Dr. E. O. Herreid to Be Honored at Illinois Dairy Technology Conference

In conjunction with the University of Illinois Centennial Celebration, a one-day conference has been planned by the Dairy Technology Staff to honor ret ir ing Professor E. 0. tIerreid. The one-day conference, September 6, in the Illini Union will be preceded by an informal gathering the evening of September 5 to allow old friends to meet, visit, and enjoy cheese snacks. A spectrum of recent and current re- search related to Milk and Dairy Products will be provided by speakers from several univer- sities. Dr. Robert Jenness will talk about milk protein research at the University of Min- nesota, Dr. D. Y. Josephson of Pennsylvania State University will repor t on new instrmnen- ration and methods in the study of flavors, and Dr. J. W. Stull of the University of Arizona will discuss the problem of pesticides in milk. Dr. J. G. Leeder of Rutgers University and Dr. J. Tobias of the University of Illinois will present highlights of current research in their respective departments. Advance registration is requested and additional infornmtion may be obtained by writing to : Conference Supervisor, 116 D Illini Hall, Champaign, Illinois 61820.

Quick, make an Advanced Milk Cryoscope

~. . ' f ind the watered mdk! A pile of parts?Noton

your life! These modules make an Advanced Milk Cryoscope that wil l find watered mi lk - - fast. They represent:

Careful engineering: As new p r o d u c t im- provements come along, you buy a new module to update your existing Advanced Mi l k Cryo- scope.

Protection against ob- solescence: Every im- provement we make in

our Advanced Milk Cry- oscope wil l fit all others in the field.

Service: I f a break- down occurs, a replace- ment module can be in- stalled while yours is serviced. Col lect calls are accepted for service on our "Hot-Line':

To find the watered m i l k - - m a k e an Ad- vanced Milk Cryoscope. Write today for free bro- chure or call collect.

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71 Kenneth Street / 617 DEcatur 2-8200 Newton Highlands, Massachusetts, 02161

J. DAIRY SCIEI'~CE ~¢'OL. 50, -~'O. 8

Page 3: People and Events

4 J O U R N A L OF D A I R Y S C I E N C E

H. E. Randoph Joins Texas Staff

Dr. H. E. Randolph, a native of Sparta, Ten- nessee, has joined the Department of Animal Science at Texas A & M University as associate professor in dairy and food technology. His

duties will include teaching and research, effective June 1, 1967.

Dr. Randolph re- ceived the B.S. degree in dail:v production from Tennessee Tech in 1957 and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Dairy Technology, in 1959 and 1962, respectively, fronl The Ohio State Univer- sity. He was dairy ex- tension specialist at the

I-I. ~.. Randolph University of Kentucky. He is a member of the

American Dairy Science Association, Interna- tional Association of Milk, Food, and Environ- mental Sanitarians, and the Societies of Gam- ma Sigma Delta and Sigma Xi. He has published 50 papers.

Lee Brandsma Promoted by Pet Inc.

Lee Brandsma, formerly quality control su- pervisor at the Research and Development Cen- ter of Pet Incorporated in Greenville, Ilinois,

has been promoted to section chief, dehydra- ted milk products, ef- fective July 1.

In his new position, he will be responsible for planning, organiz- ing, and directing the Research and Product development activities in the area of dehydra- ted milk products.

Brandsma joined Pet in 1954 and served as

Lee Brandsma product supervisor in Neosho, Missouri, from

1956 to 1958. A member of the International Association of Milk and Food Sanitarians, he earned the B.S. degree in Dairy Technology from the University of Illinois.

G. H. Schnepper Appointed Manager Gordon H. Schnepper, dairy technologist for

the Johnson & Johnson Development Labora- tories in Chicago since 1960, has been named manager of product services for its dailT de- partment.

Mr. Sehnepper graduated from the Univer- sity of Illinois in 1957 with a B.S. degree in Dairy Technology and is a native of Olney, Illinois. He is a member of the Associated J. DAIRY SCIENCE VOL. 50, NO. 8

Illinois Sanitarians, the Chicago Dairy Tech- nology Society and the International Associa- tion of Milk, Food and Environmental Sani- tarians.

Hans Pedersen Named Secretary of World Organization

Dr. Hans Pedersen, a distinguished leader in the animal sciences, was named the new Secretary of the World Association for Animal Production, effective May 10, 1967. Dr. Peder- sen succeeds Dr. Kris tof Kal lay who recently resigned to accept a position in FAO. As the recently retired Chief, Dairy Branch, FAO, Dr. Pedersen brings to W A A P a long and world-wide experience in animal production. In addition, he serves as Secretary of the European Association for Animal Production.

R. Aschaffenburg to Lecture in U.S.

Dr. R. Aschaffenburg, a distinguished protein chemist at the University of Reading in En- gland, will give two lectures at the University of Illinois, on October 11 and 12. In addition he will lead discussions on protein chemistry at the thirteenth Annual Midwest Seminar on Milk Proteins at the University of Missouri, October 13 and 14.

In 1965 Dr. Aschaffenburg was visiting pro- fessor in the Department of Food Science at the University of Illimfis.

R. W. Touchberry Granted Year's Leave with AEC

Dr. R. W. Touchberry, professor of genetics in the Department of Dairy Science at the Uni- versity of Illinois, will be on leave from Sep- tember 1, 1967, through August 31, 1968. He will serve in the Division of Biology and Medicine, Atomic Energy Comnlission, in Ger- nmntown, Maryland. _As a technical representa- tive in genetics, Touchberry will be responsible for the scientific evaluation and processing of all genetic proposals submitted for support. He will also help with the scientific evaluation of AEC-supported genetics research at various national laboratories.

Academy Will Conduct Salmonella Study

The National Academy of Sciences is under- taking a broad study of Sahnonella and its impact on human health, food technology, and animal agriculture. This study will be done under the joint sponsorship of three U.S. agencies; namely, the Agriculture Research Service, the Consumer and Marketing Service, and the Food and Drug Administration. This project will include a survey of Sahnonella contamination in food and agricultural in- dustries, the chain of infection to outbreaks of salmonellosis, and effectiveness of known control methods.

Page 4: People and Events

6 J O U R N A L OF D A I R Y S C I E N C E

Dairy Remembrance l~und

The Dairy Remembrance ~und held the an- nual meeting of its Council of Delegates and Board of Directors in Washington, D. C., on Apr i l 28, 1967. Two ADSA representatives part icipated in the meeting.

During the past year considerable interest was shown in the loan program sponsored by the Fund. At this time there is about $S,000 on loan to students studying in the field of Dairy Science, and a similar amount is still available for loan. These loans arc available to undergraduates and graduate students in amounts up to $500 per year. No interest is charged until af ter graduation, and then at the modest rate of 2%. Repayment after gradua- tion is usually made in installments of $20 to $40 per month.

With the growing need for student ]oans the Fund is concentrating on this phase of its pro- gram. A new brochure is being prepared to publicize the loan program and student ad- visors are encouraged to call this loan program to the attention of their students. Loan ap- plications are available from Joseph S. Cun- ningham, Exec. Dir., Dairy Remembrance Fund, 1145 19th St., N.W., Washington, D. C.

The Fund is supported by gifts from nation- al, state, and regional dairy associations, as well as from individuals or groups who wish to memorialize an individual or give special recognition to an event.

Other projects which have been supported by the Fund are Grants to libraries for books, pur- chase and distribution of industry recruitment fihns, special research projects, and the Robert Rosenbaum Award ($100) given annually to the first-place winner of the Collegiate Stu- dents' International Contest in Judging Dairy Products.

Dairy l~ieldmen Held Conference at Penn State

Pennsylvania Governor Raymond P. Sharer was featured speaker at the Silver Anniversary celebration of the 25th Annual Dairy Field- men's Conference held at the Pennsylvania State University on June 13-14.

Other program speakers were Professors C. W. Pierce, J. 0. Almquist, J. F. Cone, G. W. Watrous, E. M. Kesler, S. E. Barnard, and H. D. Bartlett. Speakers from industry were F. M. Greenleaf, J. H. Worley, C. W. Livak, and E. W. Cook.

Product M a n u a l

&

Price List

m m | l i m m i m m m m m i i m

COLAB , . c . Chicago Heights , Illinois 6041 ! , U.S.A.

Please send me one free copy of COLAB manual & price list.

NAME

ADDRESS

J. DAIP~Y SCIENCE VOL. 50, NO. 8

L. H. Bull, Secretary of Agriculture, Governor R. P. Shafer, J. S. Taylor, and D. V. Josephson.

Graduate Training in rood Toxicology

The Publie Health Service, Bureau of Disease Prevention and Environmental Control, has awarded a grant to the University of Wisconsin to support a Graduate Training Program in Food Toxicology. Graduate training, leading to a doctorate degree, will be under the super- vision of the University's Food Science and Industries Department and Food Research In- stitute. Anyone interested in consideration for support under this program should contact H. E. Calbert, Department of Food Science and Industries, 105 Babcock Hall, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706.

New Society for Reproduction Organized

A new Society for the Study of Reproduc- tion was organized June 21, 1967, by over 300 scientists attending the 8th Animal Reproduc- tion Symposium at the University of Illinois in Urbana. The purpose o~ the society is to promote the study of reproduction by fostering interdisciplinary communication within the sci- ence by holding an annual conference, and by

Page 5: People and Events

10 J O U R N A L OE D A I R Y S C I E N C E

publication of proceedings or by any other means which may be deemed appropriate.

The elected officers are: President, Robert Melampy, Iowa State University; Vice-Pres- ident, J. D. Biggers, Johns Hopkins University; Secretary, G. B. Marion, Kansas State Uni- versity; Treasurer, Gordon Duncan, The Up- john Co.

Charter members are being solicited from all disciplines in reproductive biology. The cost of a charter membership is $5.00 payable to Gor- don Duncan, The Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, Michigan.

The first annual symposium will be held at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, in September, 1968.

Carnation Adds to Research Staff The following personnel have been appointed

in the Carnation l~esearch Laboratories at Van Nuys, California: Lloyd M i l l e ~ P h . D . , Colorado State University, For t Collins; Casi- mir Rasiliwicz--Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Dorothy Ford- -B.S . , San Fernando Valley State College, Northridge, California; Robert Evans--B.S. , Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y.; J. P. Johnson--B.S. , California State College, Long Beach; Roy E. Meece--M.S., North Carolina State University, Raleigh ; Jeanne MeKenzie--M.S., University of Cali- fornia, Santa Barbara; Ray Nielsen--B.S.,

Utah State University, Logan; Anthony Pe- tr icca--M.S., Ohio State University, Colum- bus; John Potocny--B.S. , San Fernando State College, Northridge, California; Burdell Alfke - -M.S. , and Kernfit DeBoom--B.S., South Dakota State University, Brookings.

World Dairy Show Host Selected

The Anlerican Dairy Association of Wiscon- sin has been selected as official host for the World Food Exposition and World Dail T Show to be held at Madison, Wisconsin, Septem- ber 15-24, 1967.

The Holstein-Friesian Association and the Milking Shorthorn Society are bringing their national shows to the Madison event. All prominent state organizations in Wisconsin are support ing this World Food Exposition.

President Restricts Dairy Imports Imports of dairy products were reduced

to one-fourth the present volume beginning July 1, 1967, under an order issued June 30 by President Jolmson. This placed import quotas on a number of dairy products for the first time, reducing them from an annual rate of nearly 4.3 billion pounds milk equivalent currently to about I billion pounds.

Dairy imports have increased sharply from about 900 million pounds milk equivalent in

The Journal of the

SOCIETY of DAIRY TECHNOLOGY 17 Devonsh ire Street, London, W. 1., England.

Tel. 01-580 5059

The J o u r n a l is i s sued in qua r - t e r l y p a r t s , f o u r p a r t s c o n s t i t u t - ing a vo lume . The p a r t s a r e u s u a l l y i s sued in J a n u a r y , A p r i l , J u l y a n d O c t o b e r each y e a r .

The S u b s c r i p t i o n r a t e to non- member s of the Socie ty , p a y a b l e in a d v a n c e , is $9.80 n e t p e r vol- ume ( p o s t f r ee ) ; s ing le n u m b e r s $3.00 net . S u b s c r i p t i o n s a n d a l l bus ines s enqu i r i e s s h o u l d be sen t to the S e c r e t a r y ,

S o c i e t y of D a i r y T e c h n o l o g y , 17 D e v o n s h i r e S t r ee t , L o n d o n , W . 1., E n g l a n d .

J a n u a r y Issue

CONTENTS OF THE JANUARY ISSUE General Meeting

Presentation of the Society's Fourth Gold Medal Recent Results of Research Work in the Swiss

Federal Experimental Station for the Dairy Industry by Professor Dr. P. O. K~istli.

Aseptic Bottling of Milk by P. A. Itoare. The Role of FAO in Dairy Education in Develop-

ing Countries by A. W. Marsden. A Further Study of the Yield and Quality of

Different Milk Fractions from Machine Milked Cows by John Lewis and P. Ann Jones.

2nd International Dairy Engineering and Food Machinery Exhibition by S. C. M. Salter.

Refresher Course on Cleaning Routines in the Dairy by A. L. Wiggins.

Reports : 23rd Annual General Meeting. Mille and Milk Products Technical Advisory

Committee. British Standard. Personalia. Section Notes.

J. DAIRY SCIENCE VOL. 50, NO. 8

Page 6: People and Events

JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE 11

1965 to 2.8 billion pounds in 1966 and were nearly 4.3 billion pounds during the first half of 1967. Most of the increase has been in the form of milk fa t - sugar mixtures used in ice cream manufacture, and Colby cheese, a Ched- dar-like cheese used mainly in manufacturing process American cheese.

Geriatr ic Nutrition

The trend toward a greater social responsibil- i ty for the plight of the aged has led to an increasing interest in geriatric nutrition. The total number of persons 65 and over is ex- pected to increase. Dietary surveys have shown that many persons 65 and over, perhaps one- third or more, consmne inadequate diets, es- pecially with regard to calcium, ascorbic acid, and riboflavin, and that as they age above 65 the nutritional quality of diets tends to deteriorate. Osteoporosis is a significant prob- lem in the elderly, generally more severe in women, and its relation to the intake and metabolism of calcium, protein, phosphorus, and fluoride is being studied. The possibility still exists that the aged have different require- ments for protein or specific amino acids than younger individuals. The elderly need help in selecting a diet adequate in other nutrients but reduced in total calories. Research in the field of geriatric nutrition is complicated by individ- ual variabil i ty and the high incidence of chron- ic diseases. Quoted from National Dairy Coun- cil Digest, Vol. 38 (3), 1967.

New Planning Service for Dairymen Babson Brothers Dairy Planning Service is

offering to provide plans drawn especially for individual requirements. Services include pre- l iminary plans and construction drawing.

Insecticide Paint Developed Walpamur insecticide paint is lethal to ants,

flies, spiders, roaches, moths, and mosquitoes. I t meets all state and federal standards. This pa in t is made of poly-vinyl acetate, durable, and gives a semi-flat finish.

F o r further information contact Ray J. Ogle and Associates Inc., 1326 l~lamingo Drive, Lantana, Flor ida 33460.

Theses Completed • The Pennsylvania State University, Depart-

ment of Dairy Science

M.S. Degree James T. Lambiase, Jr. Effects of Ejacula-

tion on the Relationships Among Sperm Pro- duction, Sperm Output and Sperm Reserves of Rabbits.

Lar ry B. Campbell. The Effect of Certain

Phospholipids and Other Surfactants on the Lipolysis of Milkfat. June 1967.

• Kansas State University, Department of Dairy-Poultry Science

Ph.D. Degree Edward P. Call. Study of the Fetal Bovine

Uterus and Ovary. June 1967.

• Southern Illinois University, Department of Animal Industries

M.S. Degree Phillip L. Johnson. A Comparison of Rough-

age and Protein Sources in Complete Feeds for Dairy Cows. June 1967.

• Virginia Polytechnic Inst i tute, Department of Dairy Science

M.S. Degree David M. Lawson. The Relationship Between

Plasma 0xytocic Activity and Intramalnmary Pressure in Lactat ing Dairy Cows.

Ronald E. Buffington. Labor Study on Vir- ginia Dairy Farms Employing Full Time Work- ers.

• South Dakota State University, Department of Dairy Science

M.S. Degree Lee W. Kucker. Influence of Artificial In-

For true flavor FLAV- O- LAC

CULTURES Short cut methods may seem to afford time and money savings in producing milk prod- uc ts - -but lowering your standards for flavor c a n mean loss of customers! True flavor, natural flavor comes only from the bacterial action produced by good cultures. FLAV-O-

LAC Cul tures are re l iable , .... . . blended, standardized strains

that provide uniform, superior dairy products. The flavor they produce is nature's own- - the kind of flavor your customers prefer. Ask for information about FLAV-O-LAC Cultures, standard of the dairy industry for over 40 years.

THE DAIRY LABORATORIES 2300 Locust Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19103

J. DAIRY SCIENCE ¥OL. 50, N0.

Page 7: People and Events

12 JOURNAL OF D A I R Y SCIENCE

semination in Three Midwestern States. June 1967.

Daryl D. Boddicker. Comparison of Two Cultures for Use in Preacidified Skimmilk for Cottage Cheese Manufacture. June 1967.

Meetings 1968 Feb. 27 Nebraska Feed and Nutrition Con-

ference will be held at the Uni- versity of Nebraska Center for

Continuing Education. Specific topics will be announced in the future.

April 23-25 Twenty-second Production Con- ference of Pennsylvania Confec- tioners Association, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Those desiring to present papers should submit 200- 300-word abstracts before Sep- tember 1, 1967, to: Kenneth McCloskey, Wilbur Chocolate Com- pany, Lititz, Pennsylvania 17543.

P R I C E S C H E D U L E F O R R E P R I N T S O F P A P E R S T H A T A P P E A R IN T H E J O U R N A L O F D A I R Y S C I E N C E

C. J. CRUSE, Executive Secretary 903 Fairview Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801

The Executive Board, at the time of the Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association at the University of Wisconsin, June, 1961, increased the price of reprints 25%, effective July 1, 1961. The new reprint schedule follows :

orders nmst be received within 30 days after the papers are published in the JOURNAL; other- wise, the type will have been destroyed.

In case the original type has been destroyed, it is possible to supply reprints by a special photographic process, and their cost will be

Number of pnges No. of

reprints 2 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 (Cost in dollars)

50 17.50 2 0 . 0 0 3 6 . 2 5 51.25 67.50 78.75 97.50 115.00 125.00 100 20.00 2 2 . 5 0 4 1 . 2 5 61.25 77.50 9 2 . 5 0 112.50 132.50 145.00 200 22.50 2 8 . 7 5 5 1 . 2 5 76.25 97.50 117.50 143.75 162.75 185.00 300 28.00 3 3 . 7 5 6 2 . 5 0 9 1 . 2 5 117.50 143.75 173.75 205.00 226.25 400 30.00 40.00 72.50 107.50 137.50 170.00 205.00 241.25 266.25 500 33.75 4 5 . 0 0 8 3 . 7 5 122.50 157.50 195.00 236.25 277.25 306.25 600 37.50 5 1 . 2 5 9 3 . 7 5 137.50 177.50 221.25 266.25 313.75 346.25 700 41.25 56 .25 105.00 153.75 197.50 246.25 297.50 350.00 387.50 800 45.00 62 .50 115.00 168.75 218.75 272.50 328.75 386.25 427.50 900 48.75 67 .50 126.25 185.00 238.75 298.75 358.75 422.50 467.50

1,000 57.25 73.75 136.25 200.00 258.75 323.75 390.00 458.75 507.50

I f covers for reprints are desired, the cost of 50 covers will be $12.18, and for each addi- tional 100 covers, the cost will be $8.75. Back copies of the JOVRNAL will cost $2 each.

The reprints are made from standing type within 30 days after the papers appear in the JOURNAL. Requests for a few reprints of a paper should be sent to the authors, whose names and addresses appear with the title. The Secretary and the Editor's office do not keep supplies of the various reprints. Orders for large numbers of reprints should be sent to American Dairy Science Association, 903 Fair- view Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801. These J . DAIRY SCIENCE VOL. 50, NO. 8

50% more than the regular ones. For example, 100 reprints of 32 pages will cost $217.50.

I t is hoped that the publication of this re- pr int schedule will make it easier for inter- ested people to obtain reprints in any number desired and, at the same time, aid in dissemi- nating useful information to the dairy and related industries.

The JOURSAL OF DAmv SC:E~C~ is copy- righted. Reproduction of complete papers from this JOURNAL by any organization is not permitted. The reproduction of graphs, tables, and illustrations for books and other periodi- cals may be authorized by the Editor-in-Chief.