Paulette Valentine

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Preparedness Buddy. Paulette Valentine. Background-Where to start?. http://www.cdc.gov/phpr/capabilities/at-a-glance.pdf. Process. 1- Define 2-Locate 3-Reach. http://www.bt.cdc.gov/workbook/pdf/ph_workbookFINAL.pdf. Vulnerabilities. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Paulette Valentine

Health Promotion

Paulette Valentine

Preparedness BuddyBackground-Where to start?

http://www.cdc.gov/phpr/capabilities/at-a-glance.pdfWhen I start a big project I like to find and read the instructions. This however was a little more daunting as there were 100s of pages of direction. Throughout the PHEP capabilities there are multiple references to planning for vulnerable and at-risk populations. We identified 6 of the 14 capabilities that referenced identifying and planning for the vulnerable. 1- Community Preparedness4- Emergency Public Info7- Mass Care8- Medical Countermeasures9- Medical Materials Management10- Medical Surge

The reference verbs ranged from identifying , mapping to planning. So that was a great start to an extensive set of instructions. http://www.cdc.gov/phpr/capabilities/at-a-glance.pdf

2Process

1- Define2-Locate3-Reachhttp://www.bt.cdc.gov/workbook/pdf/ph_workbookFINAL.pdfNext we looked at the Public Health Workbook to Define, Locate, and Reach Special, Vulnerable, and At-Risk Populations in an Emergency to guide efforts of assessment http://www.bt.cdc.gov/workbook/pdf/ph_workbookFINAL.pdf WORKBOOK LINK

This was a guidance document that went over the process of creating a network termed Community Outreach Information Network (COIN) that could help with the at-risk populations. (They Coined the COIN) 5 categories for use in defining along with 2 pages of subcategories (in the form of a checklist) were provided in this workbook. It also listed websites and ideas for sources to get the data that defines the at risk in the population. This was a 64 page workbook that was helpful even if it was a long set of instructions 3Vulnerabilities

http://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/planning/abc/Pages/atrisk.aspxNext we looked at Public Health Emergency At-Risk Individuals website. There are many factsheets and videos tools and reports to provide guidance at this site. The key thing we took from this was the description of functional areas that individuals may have. http://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/planning/abc/Pages/atrisk.aspx WEBSITE LINK ABOUT AT RISK. TOOLS, INFORMATION ETC on how to define the functional ares.

We spent considerable time reading through both the workbook and this website creating our own version of a potential groups we wanted to define. We brainstormed everyone that could be vulnerable and starting thinking of ways to quantify how much of a certain vulnerable population we may have. I learned from a young age that I liked to quantify things. Very quickly it became apparent that everyone was vulnerable in some way or another. The importance of the organization of our findings also became apparent. We knew some areas we wanted data on would not have a readily available source. 4

Categories

CommunicationTransportationMedical CareIndependence & SupervisionSo we settled on 4 categories. Using the premise that certain individuals may have greater difficulty accessing the public health and medical services they require following a disaster or emergency we set out to find and organize data on those vulnerabilities. It often felt like more of a web of categories instead of clear cut categories. But we pressed on using 4 functional vulnerability categories and then listed subcategories in these areas. In our final product we used the format of first a section with each counties view, and then a vulnerabilities view that included all 5 counties within our district. 5CDC Social Vulnerabilitieshttp://svi.cdc.gov/map.aspxCDC Snaps datahttp://www.bt.cdc.gov/snapsUS Census American FactFinder-S1810 tablehttp://factfinder2.census.govCommunity Action Partnership-CNA online toolhttp://www.communityactioncna.orgUS Census Language Mapperhttp://census.gov/hhes/socdemo/language/data/language_map.htmlNational Data GATHERING SourcesPart 1: AssessingPart 1: Assessing Where we gatheredSo lets go through some of the sources we used. I started with the CDC SNAPS data. Lets go to the website and show you what it has put together http://www.bt.cdc.gov/snaps/(have a audience member pick a state and county do demo with)

While this was a starting point we found the 2000 numbers were getting to be 13 years old so we needed to go to the more recent census or turn the numbers into percentage and then back into more real time numbers assuming the disability % hadnt changed drastically (but we do live upwind of test sites!) I used the advanced search option of the American Fact Finder page of the US CENSUS. I looked to the S1810 form in the Census fact finder to show disability data by county.

6CDC Social Vulnerabilities

Part 1 Assessing - WhereCDC SNAPSPart 1: Assessing

www.bt.cdc.gov/snapsPart 1: AssessingWhere Its a quick select with some data that would be relevant to emergency preparedness vulnerabilities. Here are screen shots incase we cant do live demosWhile this was a starting point we found the 2000 numbers were getting to be 13 years old so we needed to go to the more recent census or turn the numbers into percentage and then back into more real time numbers assuming the disability % hadnt changed drastically (but we do live upwind of test sites!) I used the advanced search option of the American Fact Finder page of the US CENSUS. I looked to the S1810 form in the Census fact finder to show disability data by county.

8Fact FinderPart 1: Assessing

factfinder2.census.govPart 1: AssessingWhere On the US Census website there is the American Fact Finder S1810 table that was particularly helpful for updating the disability sections

9Community Action PartnershipPart 1: Assessing

www.communityactioncna.orgPart 1: AssessingWhereThis resource is great for a quick way to start out similar to CDC SNAPs except it produces a longer document for our area it was 37 pages. But it is very simple to use and within 3 minutes you can have a nicely formatted document with the variables you select. www.communityactioncna.org

10Part 1: Assessing

Part 1: AssessingWhereThis an example of the TOC from the report that is generated in minutes for your area. You can scale this to whatever geographic location you need11Beaver Garfield Iron Kane WashingtonCommunicationDisabilityCognitiveMedical CareDialysisPharmacologicalIndependence SupervisionTransportationAccess to vehicleGeographic isolation

CountyVulnerability BeaverGarfieldIron Kane Washington No vehicle4663563711,513 Births 201013963902812,476 Renters24.5% 24.4% 36.3% 25.4% 29.5% Here is an example of the format of the first section. There are 5 counties within Southwest Utah Public Health. So we have taken each county and have a page for each functional area (First county 4 pages: 1 communication in Beaver, pg 2 Medical Care in Beaver etc ; Second county 4 pages: 1 Communication in Washington, pg 2 Medical care in Washington, and so on) We have with each counties view, and then a vulnerabilities view that included all 5 counties within our district. Left Beaver County view, Right district view.13How is it possible to meet the need of the all vulnerable especially the elderly in an emergency?

WhyWhatWhereWhenWhoNext Steps

PREPAREDNESS BUDDY

Personal ResponsibilityNot enough personnelNeighbor helping neighborDr. Daniel Aldrich

Calls CERT?WHY

17,000 Square miles5 Counties52 Employees215,000 People

WHY Southwest Utah Health DepartmentGather the nine essential itemsPlan 9Know where your kit is?

WHAT Preparedness Buddy

Preparedness BuddyPersonal Emergency PlanDo you have someone who could check on you?Trusted Friend (key story)

WHAT

Preparedness BuddyWhat is the phone number of the buddy?Call now?

WHAT

Preparedness BuddyWrite down any MEDICATION you need to sustain lifeLet the buddy know?

WHAT

Preparedness BuddySpecial Equipment?

WHAT

Medical providerIf you need to get in touch with the doctor who should they call

Next of KinDo you have a relative we can contact for you?

Preparedness BuddyWhat else?http://www.swuhealth.org

WHAT

How to Engage Community Partners in Helping with the Responsibility for Seniors Safety

Social Connection

CONNECTION IS THE KEY!Started SmallKane County DataMeals on WheelsWHERE

ESF 8 PartnersOthers?Brain stormShare the pamphlets (use PHEP funds)Smaller agencies Appreciate

WHERE

ESF 8 partnersReporting and data gatheredBe the Champion to gather information WHERE

HPP CoalitionHome HealthMedical Supply CompaniesWHEREFaith-based GroupsAll ready do thisOrganized

WHERECommunity GroupsCERTRED CROSSHHS GroupsDisabilitiesMental HealthWHERE>55 communitiesProperty Management CompaniesOthers?WHEREMarketingVideohttps://www.youtube.com/

Search Preparedness Buddy

WHEN - KICK OFFMarketingHomelessWHEN - KICK OFF

MarketingChildrenWHEN - Kick Off

MarketingElderlyWHEN - Kick Off

Marketing Everyone

Kick Off

Homeless ShelterHHS groups for the homelessHousingFood pantriesWHOChildrenSchool DistrictsDay Cares4-H GroupsBoy and Girl Scout GroupsWHOSenior CentersOver 55 Housing AssociationsOver 55 CommunitiesWHO - Elderly

Community PartnersEmergency ManagersCERTMRCWHO - Everyone

Community InvolvementRestraintsTimePeopleOther?NEXT STEPThis takes time.Dont pull your hairBe the champion to push things forwardGet together as a community to decide what will happenPlan

QUESTIONS?Paulette Valentinepvalentine@swuhealth.org435-986-2579