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176 the illegitimate child for whom Providence has prepared it, a deadly poison for any other? The writer of your "Medical Annotations " is led astray, I think, by the contemplation of a possibility that never can arise. No one proposes to employ prostitutes. Prostitutes hardly ever have children. No ac- coucheur on the look-out for a wet-nurse could be deceived into taking a syphilitic harlot. Of taint from milk there is much more chance from a nurse who has patched up a bad reputation by marriage, and has been accepted on the faith of her certificate, than from an unmarried girl whose one fault would excite the most rigid and unceasing scrutiny. Now, is there, can there be, any danger, bodily or moral, to an infant, from allowing a girl with her first child, carefully ascertained to be absolutely healthy, to nurse it? To herself or her employer we have seen there can be none. I deny that there can be any to the child. Physically, the nurse would be ascertained, and is now ascertained, in every case, to be perfectly healthy, and her milk perfectly wholesome. There can be no doubt, no decep- tion about this, if the selection of the nurse, as it always should, be made the doctor’s task. You express a fear as to the effect of ’’ bursts of rage or passions of grief," or other temporary altections that are likely to affect the milk-more likely, he thinks, in a case where the previous life has been "disordered and irregular." Which is most likely to have healthy milk?-a sickly, feeble, nervous, dyspeptic, or fashionable mother, such as those generally are who cannot or will not nurse their children; or a penitent girl, rejoicing at her escape from final ruin, and bodily healthy .and strong ? As to any permanent moral effect, I need only state the fear to - calm it. It is feared that if a child be suckled for a few months by a woman who has illegally obtained the power of nursing it, though otherwise moral and healthy, that baby will, by virtue of its illegally-secreted food, contract a love of illegality and forbidden pleasure. With what omniscient power should the previous lives, nay, I thoughts and feelings, of all nurses—ay, and mothers-be .scrutinized, if this be true ! And how many infants, had we this power, would be condemned to the pap-bottle, indigestion, and the grave ! No, Sir, this philanthropy is not " ill-judged," and all requi- site care is now, and will be, as the custom extends, " exerted .to avoid the mischief that might flow from it." I am, Sir, your obedient servant, Q’jeen Anne-street, Feb. 1359. W. ACTION. W. ACTON. THE PROFESSION AND HOMŒOPATHY. HENRY J. YELD, Secretary. Andersonian University, Glasgow, Feb. 1859. To the Editor of THE LANCET. SIR,—I beg to forward you a copy of a resolution passed at a meeting of the Andersonian University Medical Society, held on Saturday, January 29th, respecting a Dr. Gutteridge, of Leicester, an honorary member of this Society, who has em- braced the practice of homœopathy, and is the surgeon to a homœopathic dispensary in Leicester. I am, Sir, your obedient servant, Andersonian University, HENRY J. YELD, Secretary. Glasgow, Feb. 1859. ____ AKDERSONIAN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SOCIETY, GLASGOW.- President, Andrew Anderson, M.D. -At a meeting of the ,above Society, held on Saturday, January 29th-Mr. James Duncan, V.P., in the chair,-Mr. Yeld read an extract from the Leicester Journal, in which Dr. Gutteridge, an honorary member of this Society, advertizes his homoeopathic establish- ment, and, after making a few remarks, moved-"That Dr. Gutteridge having given up the legitimate practice of medicine by advocating and practising homœopathic principles, his name be forthwith erased from the list of honorary members of this Society." ’1 he motion was seconded by Mr. C-ibb, and carried unanimously. On the motion of Mr. McGlashan, the Secretary was re- quested to forward a copy of the foregoing resolution to the medical journals. APPOINTMENTS.—Dr. Graily Hewitt has been appointed physician to the British Lying-in Hospital, in the place of Dr. Robert Lee, resigned.—Messrs. Weight and Barford, of W ok ingham, are appointed surgeons to the Wellington Col- lege ; and Mr. Barford is named to the office of chemical lecturer to the institution. Parliamentary Intelligence. HOUSE OF COMMONS. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3RD. TREATMENT OF LUNATICS. Mr. TITE gave notice that on Tuesday, the 15th inst., he should move for a Select Committee to inquire into the opera- tion of the law relative to the trial and treatment of lunatics, especially those so found by inquisition. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7TH. Lord NAAS moved for leave to bring in a Bill to consolidate and amend the law relating to the Lunatic Poor in Ireland, the main object of which, he stated, was, in conformity with the recommendations of a Commission, to substitute local authority in the management of the asylums for central and governmental authority, and he described the machinery by which this system of management would be carried out. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8TH. SALTS OF POISONS. Mr. WALPOLE, in moving for leave to bring in a Bill to regulate the keeping and sale of poisons, said,-I am not aware whether the House wishes me to go into details of the Bill now, or to do so on the second reading, but perhaps I may be per- mitted to state this :-At the end of last session a Bill for reo gulating the sale of poisons unanimously passed the other House. When it came down here great objections were taken to it on two grounds-first, that the late period of the session did not allow sufficient time for its consideration; secondly, that the trade of druggists would be interfered with by clauses and re- strictions in that Bill. With regard to the late period of the session, that objection is rectified by my bringing forward a Bill at the earliest possible opportunity. With regard to the second objection, I may state that I think I have obviated many diffi- culties in the way of the Bill of last session. But all the rea- sons which urged the propriety of such a Bill last summer are increased. I think, to an amazing extent bv the fearful occur- rence which took place in the autumn at Bradford, and I am sure no one holding the high place which I do would be doing his duty, and Parliament would not be doing their duty unless they endeavoured by some regulations to prevent those acci- dents and mistakes in the sale of poison by means of which the whole population is put in peril. (Hear, hear.) The object of the Bill which I venture to propose is entirely to regulate the sale of poisons, and I found my provisions on the provisions in the Arsenic Act and the Act for further Regulating the Sale of Arsenic. The Arsenic Act contained certain provisions for regulating and restricting the sale of arsenic. Where a person wishes to purchase arsenic, the fact of the sale, the names of the parties concerned in the sale and purchase, and other cir- cumstances attending the transaction, must all be registered at the time. The question arises whether those provisions have answered the purpose for which they were intended ? According to the evidence of Mr. Bell and other gentlemen representing the Pharmaceutical Society, Dr. Taylor, and other famous chemists, given before a committee of the House of Lords, the ArsenicAct has to a great extent tended to diminish the number of poisonings from arsenic. The House will observe that of the number of deaths which occur from poison, many arise from accident. As to deaths occasioned by poison, where the poison is given for the purpose of taking away life, or where it is taken by persons themselves with that view, I am well aware that you cannot by any regulations altogether prevent that form of the evil. With regard to murder by poison, there are provi- sions in my Bill which may assist in detecting the perpetrator; but I do not think it will have any material effect in preventing murder by the administration of poison. If you refer to the Registrar-General’s returns, you will find that eight-tenths of the cases of self-destruction are by the halter, drowning, or the knife-and there are only two-tenths which can be referred to poisons and other causes. Therefore, it would mislead the House if I held out any hope of being able greatly to diminish the number of suicides by the provisions of this Bill. Its chief object is to regulate the keeping and sale of poisons, so as to prevent the deaths which occur by accidental poisoning. The other question which I have to submit to the House is, what things should be included in the schedules of the Bill as poisons. In the Bill of the other House there were 23 articles in one schedule, and I don’t know how many in the other. It was

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the illegitimate child for whom Providence has prepared it, adeadly poison for any other? The writer of your "MedicalAnnotations " is led astray, I think, by the contemplation of apossibility that never can arise. No one proposes to employprostitutes. Prostitutes hardly ever have children. No ac-coucheur on the look-out for a wet-nurse could be deceivedinto taking a syphilitic harlot. Of taint from milk there ismuch more chance from a nurse who has patched up a badreputation by marriage, and has been accepted on the faith ofher certificate, than from an unmarried girl whose one faultwould excite the most rigid and unceasing scrutiny.Now, is there, can there be, any danger, bodily or moral,

to an infant, from allowing a girl with her first child, carefullyascertained to be absolutely healthy, to nurse it? To herselfor her employer we have seen there can be none. I deny thatthere can be any to the child.

Physically, the nurse would be ascertained, and is nowascertained, in every case, to be perfectly healthy, and hermilk perfectly wholesome. There can be no doubt, no decep-tion about this, if the selection of the nurse, as it always should,be made the doctor’s task.You express a fear as to the effect of ’’ bursts of rage or

passions of grief," or other temporary altections that are likelyto affect the milk-more likely, he thinks, in a case where theprevious life has been "disordered and irregular." Which ismost likely to have healthy milk?-a sickly, feeble, nervous,dyspeptic, or fashionable mother, such as those generally arewho cannot or will not nurse their children; or a penitentgirl, rejoicing at her escape from final ruin, and bodily healthy.and strong ?

As to any permanent moral effect, I need only state the fear to- calm it. It is feared that if a child be suckled for a few monthsby a woman who has illegally obtained the power of nursingit, though otherwise moral and healthy, that baby will, byvirtue of its illegally-secreted food, contract a love of illegalityand forbidden pleasure. ’

With what omniscient power should the previous lives, nay, I

thoughts and feelings, of all nurses—ay, and mothers-be.scrutinized, if this be true ! And how many infants, had wethis power, would be condemned to the pap-bottle, indigestion,and the grave !No, Sir, this philanthropy is not " ill-judged," and all requi-

site care is now, and will be, as the custom extends, " exerted.to avoid the mischief that might flow from it."

I am, Sir, your obedient servant, Q’jeen Anne-street, Feb. 1359. W. ACTION. W. ACTON.

THE PROFESSION AND HOMŒOPATHY.

HENRY J. YELD, Secretary.Andersonian University,Glasgow, Feb. 1859.

To the Editor of THE LANCET.SIR,—I beg to forward you a copy of a resolution passed at a

meeting of the Andersonian University Medical Society, heldon Saturday, January 29th, respecting a Dr. Gutteridge, ofLeicester, an honorary member of this Society, who has em-braced the practice of homœopathy, and is the surgeon to ahomœopathic dispensary in Leicester.

I am, Sir, your obedient servant,Andersonian University, HENRY J. YELD, Secretary.

Glasgow, Feb. 1859. ____

AKDERSONIAN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SOCIETY, GLASGOW.-President, Andrew Anderson, M.D. -At a meeting of the,above Society, held on Saturday, January 29th-Mr. JamesDuncan, V.P., in the chair,-Mr. Yeld read an extract fromthe Leicester Journal, in which Dr. Gutteridge, an honorarymember of this Society, advertizes his homoeopathic establish-ment, and, after making a few remarks, moved-"That Dr.Gutteridge having given up the legitimate practice of medicineby advocating and practising homœopathic principles, his namebe forthwith erased from the list of honorary members of thisSociety." ’1 he motion was seconded by Mr. C-ibb, and carriedunanimously.On the motion of Mr. McGlashan, the Secretary was re-

quested to forward a copy of the foregoing resolution to themedical journals.

APPOINTMENTS.—Dr. Graily Hewitt has been appointedphysician to the British Lying-in Hospital, in the place ofDr. Robert Lee, resigned.—Messrs. Weight and Barford, ofW ok ingham, are appointed surgeons to the Wellington Col-lege ; and Mr. Barford is named to the office of chemicallecturer to the institution.

Parliamentary Intelligence.HOUSE OF COMMONS.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3RD.

TREATMENT OF LUNATICS.

Mr. TITE gave notice that on Tuesday, the 15th inst., heshould move for a Select Committee to inquire into the opera-tion of the law relative to the trial and treatment of lunatics,especially those so found by inquisition.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7TH.Lord NAAS moved for leave to bring in a Bill to consolidate

and amend the law relating to the Lunatic Poor in Ireland, themain object of which, he stated, was, in conformity with therecommendations of a Commission, to substitute local authorityin the management of the asylums for central and governmentalauthority, and he described the machinery by which this systemof management would be carried out.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8TH.SALTS OF POISONS.

Mr. WALPOLE, in moving for leave to bring in a Bill toregulate the keeping and sale of poisons, said,-I am not awarewhether the House wishes me to go into details of the Bill now,or to do so on the second reading, but perhaps I may be per-mitted to state this :-At the end of last session a Bill for reogulating the sale of poisons unanimously passed the other House.When it came down here great objections were taken to it ontwo grounds-first, that the late period of the session did notallow sufficient time for its consideration; secondly, that thetrade of druggists would be interfered with by clauses and re-strictions in that Bill. With regard to the late period of thesession, that objection is rectified by my bringing forward a Billat the earliest possible opportunity. With regard to the secondobjection, I may state that I think I have obviated many diffi-culties in the way of the Bill of last session. But all the rea-sons which urged the propriety of such a Bill last summer areincreased. I think, to an amazing extent bv the fearful occur-rence which took place in the autumn at Bradford, and I amsure no one holding the high place which I do would be doinghis duty, and Parliament would not be doing their duty unlessthey endeavoured by some regulations to prevent those acci-dents and mistakes in the sale of poison by means of which thewhole population is put in peril. (Hear, hear.) The object ofthe Bill which I venture to propose is entirely to regulate thesale of poisons, and I found my provisions on the provisions inthe Arsenic Act and the Act for further Regulating the Sale ofArsenic. The Arsenic Act contained certain provisions forregulating and restricting the sale of arsenic. Where a personwishes to purchase arsenic, the fact of the sale, the names ofthe parties concerned in the sale and purchase, and other cir-cumstances attending the transaction, must all be registered atthe time. The question arises whether those provisions haveanswered the purpose for which they were intended ? Accordingto the evidence of Mr. Bell and other gentlemen representingthe Pharmaceutical Society, Dr. Taylor, and other famouschemists, given before a committee of the House of Lords, theArsenicAct has to a great extent tended to diminish the numberof poisonings from arsenic. The House will observe that of thenumber of deaths which occur from poison, many arise fromaccident. As to deaths occasioned by poison, where the poison

is given for the purpose of taking away life, or where it is takenby persons themselves with that view, I am well aware thatyou cannot by any regulations altogether prevent that form ofthe evil. With regard to murder by poison, there are provi-sions in my Bill which may assist in detecting the perpetrator;but I do not think it will have any material effect in preventingmurder by the administration of poison. If you refer to the

Registrar-General’s returns, you will find that eight-tenths ofthe cases of self-destruction are by the halter, drowning, or theknife-and there are only two-tenths which can be referred topoisons and other causes. Therefore, it would mislead theHouse if I held out any hope of being able greatly to diminishthe number of suicides by the provisions of this Bill. Its chief

object is to regulate the keeping and sale of poisons, so as to

prevent the deaths which occur by accidental poisoning. Theother question which I have to submit to the House is, whatthings should be included in the schedules of the Bill as poisons.In the Bill of the other House there were 23 articles in oneschedule, and I don’t know how many in the other. It was

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utterly impossible, with such schedules, that the business of achemist could be carried on. Nor was there any necessity toinclude all these articles in them. The case of death by poisonarose from a very few articles, and I have therefore cut thenumber down from 23 to 13; and I shall be very glad if anyhon. gentleman will point out to me how it can be further re-duced. The only article about which I entertain a difficultyis opium, because it is one of those things which are con-

stantly asked for by the poorer class of people in small quan-tities, and if you put a difficulty in the way of giving it insmall quantities to persons who desire it, you may interfereinconveniently with the trade of the chemist. I get over thedifficulty by providing that, where any poisonous article isrequired by a medical prescription, or where opium is askedfor in small quantities, the stricter provisions of the Bill shallnot apply. The subject is one of considerable difficulty, and Iinvite the serious attention of the House to it, in the hope offraming such a measure as will meet completely the end wehave in view. (Hear, hear.) The right hon. gentleman con-cluded by moving for leave to introduce the Bill.The motion was agreed to, and the Bill was subsequently

brought in and read a first time.

Medical News.ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS.-The following gentle-

men, having undergone the necessary examinations for the

diploma, were admitted members of the College, at a meetingof the Court of Examiners on the 4th inst. :-

HEPwoRTH, WiLLIAM, Ginsley, near Leeds.JORDAN, ROBERT JACOB, Bedford- square.KEENE, FREDERICK, Bow-road.SANDERS, CHARLES, Chigwell, Essex.STOKES, HENRY, Brixton.WEBER, ADOLPH, Lima, South America.

The following gentlemen were admitted members on the 7thinst. :-

BARKER, DANIEL, Macclesfield.BARKWAY, ROBERT EDGAR EDWARD, Bungay, Suffolk.CAMERON, CHARLES, Calcutta.CAYLEY, WILLIAM, Stamford, Lincolnshire.COTTAM, ROBERT, Leeds.HucHES, ADOLPHUS JAMES, Dartford, Kent.JoNES, PRYCE, Llanrwst, North Wales.KAY, JOHN WILLIAM, Huddersfield.MILBURN, JOHN THOMAS, Ryton, near Newcastle-on-Tyne.POPE, RICHARD TYRREL, Bristol.PROVIS, WILLIAM ALEXANDER, Holyhead.SUTTON, WILLIAM, Smethwick, near Birmingham.

LICENTIATES IN MIDWIFERY.—The following members of theCollege, having undergone the necessary examinations, wereadmitted Licentiates in Midwifery at the meeting of the Boardof Examiners on the 9th inst. :-

BENSLEY, EDWIN CLEMENT, Calcutta; diploma of member-ship dated Nov. 5, 1858.

BILDERBECK, JOHN, Madras; Dec. 20, 1858.1,NCE, EUGENE SEYS, Wilton-street, Belgravia; Nov. 7, 1856.JONES, GEO., Newhall-street, Birmingham; March 9, 1838.JoNES, Tnos., Cott-street, Limehouse; Oct. 24, 1856.GUTTERIDGE, EDWIN PARKER, Brighton; April 28, 1856.GwYNNE, THOMAS, Brecon, South Wales; Jan. 19, 1859.HoRTON, HENRY, Wednesbury, Staffordshire; Jan. 14, 1859.LEACH, JAMES, Shaw, near Oldham; Jan. 14, 1859.SUTTON, WILLIAM, Smethwick, near Birmingham; Feb. 7,

1859.WATSON, J., Southampton-st., Bloomsbury; Dec. 20, 1858.APOTHECARIES’ HALL. - Names of gentlemen who

passed their examination in the science and practice of medi-cine, and received certificates to practise, on

Thursday, February 3rd, 1859.ADAMS, JOSEPH DixoN, Martock, Somersetshire.CALL, THos. JAS., Yorkshire.CUNNINGHAM, CHARLES LENNOX, Hailsham, Sussex.DEE, JOHN, Royal Mail Service.GODRICH, THOMAS, Chichester-road, Westbonrne-terrace.KIBBLER, RICHARD COMMANDER, Duncan-place, London-

fields, Hackney.ROBINSON, AUGUSTUS, Annapolis, Nova Scotia.

The following gentlemen also, on the same day, passed theirfirst examination :--

BARTER, CLFMENT SMITH, Batb.READ, SAMUEL, Hemel Hempstead.

THE CURE OF CANCER IN PARIS.-The medical andextra-medical world of Paris are considerably agitated by thefortunate result of a new treatment of cancer; and the successhas been sufficiently striking to give rise to a regular clinicaltrial, now going on at the Charite Hospital, under the super-vision of M. Velpeau. It would appear that a gentleman, wellknown in the salons of Paris, had for the last few years beensufferine, from a melanotic tumour of the upper lip, which hadfinally reached the size of a walnut, a gland having in themeanwhile enlarged under the lower maxilla, and attained thebulk of a hen’s egg. M. Ricord was consulted, and it wasagreed, after M. Velpeau had given his opinion, that thetumour and gland should be removed. A little before the dayfixed for the operation, the patient was advised to apply to &

Dr. Vriès, who was alleged to have discovered a cure for cancer.The Doctor promised to free the patient without the use of theknife, and commenced by subjecting him to a very spare diet;this was gradually made lower until nothing was allowed but alittle tea. After two months of this oura fanais, the patientwas allowed to eat and drink as he liked, although the tumourhad considerably increased. The secret treatment now began,after a photograph of the patient had been taken; and in thespace of about two months a very severe crisis occurred-thewhole face swelled considerably, and the tumour fell off in

gangrenous pieces. The state of the patient improved fromthat moment: the gland diminished to the size of a filbert ;

’ and the lip has now, after a treatment of six months, almostrecovered its former shape and appearance. It should benoticed that Dr. Vries always affirraed, even when the tumourwas increasing, that he was confident he would completelycure the patient. This case has been somewhat ostentatiouslyparaded in the Moniteur des Hôpitaux, and its publication has-called forth a letter from M. Velpeau, wherein he rather sharplytakes the supporters of Dr. Vris to task. M. Velpeau contendsthat such cases are exceptional, that they have been seen be-fore, but that they do not prove that an antidote for cancerhas been found. He concludes by simply calling upon Dr. Vrièsto apply his remedy to some cancer patients at the Charite,.where the cases will be watched and duly reported upon. Ifthe treatment is found successful, he will be the first to pro-claim to the world the value of the remedy. The challengehas been accepted, and the experiment is now going on. Thisbusiness will probably end in deception and disappointment,as did the Middlesex trial in our own metropolis; nor can itbe doubted for a moment that the unfortunate gentleman willsuffer a relapse, his case being again one of those in which pre-mature publication dignifies a method with the name of in-fallible, when the unlucky sufferer is on the eve of a recurrence-of this dreadful and, unhappily, incurable malady.ROYAL MEDICAL AND CHIRURGICAL SOCIETY. - The

following gentlemen were, at the last meeting of this Society,elected honorary fellows :—Mr. J. T. Quekett, Prof. J. Henle,Dr. P. Rayer, and Prof. W. Vrolik.THE LUNACY QUESTION. -On Tuesday week, an in-

fluential meeting was held at Exeter Hall, Benjamin BondCabbell, Esq., F.R.S., in the chlir, supported by Vice-AdmiralSaumarez, Dr. Conolly, Mr. J. Perceval, Dr. Pearce, of North-ampton, Rev. H. Ward, - Selby, Esq., D. Buchanan, Dr.Copland, Mr. Bostock, Mr. Bailey, Mr. Bolden, and others.

Mr. BOLDEN, hon. secretary, gave a statement respectinglunatics, compiled from the twelfth and last report of the Com-missioners in Lunacy, ordered by the House of Commons to beprinted June 16th, 1858. The number of lunatics under con-finement in public asylums was 15,163; in hospitals, includingBethlehem, 1751; in private lunatic asylums, 5270-total,22,184, divided into the following classes: Pauper patients,17,572; private patients, 4612. Of these, 295 had been foundlunatic under inquisition, and were chiefly confined in privateasylums; and 633 were criminal lunatics, who were almostentirely confined to Bethlehem and the county asylums. Therewere also about 800 idiots and harmless lunatics confined invarious workhouses throughout the kingdom. The new ad-missions into public asylums, during the year 1858, were 47a1,or 31 per cent. on the total. The like admissions into private asylums were 2324, or 44 per cent. on the total. Number dis-charged " recovered" from public asylums, 1854, being 38 percent. on new admissions, and 12 per cent. on the total. Num-ber discharged cured from private asylums, 672, being 28 per