of 26 /26
04/21/2017 1 Hormones Impact on Bone Health Throughout the Lifespan Meryl S. LeBoff, MD Director, Skeletal Health and Osteoporosis Chief, Calcium and Bone Section Brigham and Women’s Hospital Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School Medical Society Lecture 4/21/17 Women’s Health Forum: Hormones: Do They Define Us? Outline Sex differences in: Osteoporosis and fracture rates Secondary causes of osteoporosis The role of sex hormones on bone Effects of menopausal estrogen therapy and bone

Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

  • Upload
    others

  • View
    4

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

1

Hormones Impact on Bone Health Throughout the Lifespan

Meryl S. LeBoff, MD

Director, Skeletal Health and Osteoporosis

Chief, Calcium and Bone Section

Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Medical Society Lecture 4/21/17

Women’s Health Forum:  Hormones: Do They Define Us?

Outline

Sex differences in:

Osteoporosis and fracture rates

Secondary causes of osteoporosis

The role of sex hormones on bone

Effects of menopausal estrogen therapy and bone

Page 2: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

2

Normal Bone Woman with Osteoporosis

Loss of bone mass and horizontal trabeculaeBorah, B et al., Anat Rec. 2001;265(2):101‐10.

Osteoporotic Changes in the Trabecular Architecture of Vertebrae

2,000,000

0

500,000

1,000,000

1,500,000

2,000,000

OsteoporoticFractures

Burge, R et al.,. J Bone Miner Res. 2007;22(3):465‐75.Heart & Stroke Facts: 2017 Statistical Supplement, American Heart Assoc  Cancer Facts & Figures ‐ 2017, American Cancer Society

Osteoporotic Fractures are Common 

790,000

Heart Attack 

795,000

Stroke

252,710

Breast Cancer (new cases)

550,000vertebral

675,000 other sites

400,000wrist

300,000hip

Annual in

ciden

ce of common diseases

It is estimated that up to 50% of women and 20% of men aged 50 years or older will suffer an  osteoporosis‐related 

fracture in their remaining lifetime

135,000pelvic

185,000recurrent

610,000new580,000

new

210,000recurrent

Page 3: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

3

Progression of Osteoporosis Across the Lifespan

Bone Mineral Density (BMD) Measurement: Dual‐energy X‐ray absorptiometry (DXA)

• Predicts fracture risk• “Gold standard” for BMD• High precision, accuracy• Low radiation exposure• Rapidly measures spine,

hip, forearm, total body Hologic Horizon A DXA System

Page 4: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

4

Spine (PA) Bone Density by DXA

Instant Vertebral Assessment (IVA)

Fracture

• 75% of spine fractures are not clinically evident

• Patients with a spine fracture have a 5‐fold increased risk of  a spine and 2‐fold risk of a  hip fracture

• IVA is a rapid 10 second test with a bone density

Page 5: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

5

Incidence of Fractures is Bimodal: Males vs. Females

Geusens, P et al., Nat Rev Rheumatol. 2009 Sep;5(9):497‐504.

Why Are Fractures Less Common In Men Than Women?

• Bone Loss: No accelerated bone loss with menopause and slightly later onset of age‐related bone loss although at a similar rate

• Biomechanical Factors: Bones are bigger with greater cross‐sectional area, periosteal bone expansion and cortical thickness, which reduce fracture risk

• Other Factors: Higher androgen levels increase periosteal bone formation and the expansion of bone, greater muscle mass, and growth factors. 

Page 6: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

6

Biomechanical Factors: In Men Bones Bigger, Greater Cross‐sectional Area and Periosteoum

MALE

FEMALE

YOUNG              OLD

Yilmaz, D et al., J Bone Miner Metab. 2005;23(6):476‐82.

Serum Estradiol and Testosterone in Pubertal Girls and Boys

Page 7: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

7

Apter, D et al. Acta Paediatr Scand. 1979 Jul;68(4): 599–604.

Serum DHEA, ACTH, and cortisol in pubertal girls and boys

Interconversion to Androgens and Estrogen

Modified from: Buster and Casson, 1999

Page 8: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

8

Significant Relationships between Circulating Levels of Hormone and Bone Density 

Women Men

Total estrogen + +a

Bioavailable estrogen + +

DHEA +a ‐

Bioavailable testosterone +b +

aExcept UD radiusbUD radius     

Greendale, GA et al.,  J Bone Miner Res. 1997 Nov;12(11):1833‐43.; Khosla, S et al., J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1998 Jul;83(7):2266‐74.            

Estrogen is important for the female AND male skeleton: 

Effects of Estrogens and Androgens on Bone Remodeling

Manolagas, SC et al., Nat Rev Endocrinol 2013 Dec;9(12):699‐712.

•Black → Posi ve effects•Red Ⱶ Negative effects•Black  dashed arrows ‐‐‐> Differentiation of cells

Page 9: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

9

Bone Health in Men

• Males with aromatase deficiency and a mutation in the estrogen receptor had unfused epiphyses and an increase in bone turnover (Smith et al. NEJM 1994; 331(16):1056‐61.; Morishima et al. JCEM 1995;

80(12):3689‐98.; Carani Et al. NEJM 1997; 37(2):91‐5.)

• In males, estrogen is the main sex steroid that controls bone breakdown  and formation (Falahati‐Nini et al. J Clin Invest 2000; 106(12):1553‐60.)

• Orchiectomy in men causes a loss in testosterone leading to an increase in bone resorption and bone loss (Stepan et al. JCEM 1989;69(3):523‐7.)

• Androgen deprivation for prostate cancer is associated with bone loss and fractures

Osteoporosis and Secondary Osteoporosis

• Hypogonadism

• Glucocorticoid Excess

• Hyperthyroidism

• Anorexia

• Renal Insufficiency

• Gastrointestinal Disorders 

• Hypercalciuria

• Hyperparathyroidism

• Chronic Respiratory Disorders

• Immobilization

• Osteogenesis imperfecta

• Systematic mastocytosis

• Neoplastic diseases

• Rheumatoid arthritis

Page 10: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

10

Why is the Identification of Secondary Osteoporoses Important? 

Secondary osteoporoses can lead to:

• Skeletal changes that may be reversible 

• Reduced acquisition of peak bone mass, a determinant of osteoporosis later in life

• Increased bone loss and elevated fracture risk

Bone Health Across Lifespan

Adolescents and Young Adults:‐ Anorexia

‐ Female Athlete Triad*

Women: ‐ Sex steroid deficiency; chemotherapy and adjuvant therapy for breast cancer

*Gordon CM and LeBoff MS ed. The Female Athlete Triad‐A Clinical Guide, NY. Springer. 2015

Page 11: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

11

Osteoporosis Associated with Amenorrhea

Anorexia• Anorexia leads to 25% lower spine bone 

mass, decreased peak bone mass and 7‐fold increased fractures

• Anorectic women have subnormal DHEA, testosterone, IGF‐I, and estrogen and high cortisol levels

• Transdermal estrogen increases bone density and a low‐dose oral contraceptive and micronized DHEA prevents bone loss in anorexia

• Correction of nutritional deficits of paramount importance

Misra, M, et al., J Bone Miner Res. 2011; 26:2430.Gordon, CM, et al., J of Bone and Miner Res. 1999; 14:136.Gordon, CM et al., J Clin EndoMetab. 2002; 87:4935.DiVasta, AD et al., J Bone Miner Res. 2014; 29:151.

Page 12: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

12

Women and Breast Cancer

• Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women.

• Breast cancer patients have prolonged survival.

• Chemotherapy has been the standard of care in premenopausal women and most women lose normal menstrual function.

• Chemotherapy and cancer treatments lead to rapid bone loss 

Breast Cancer in Premenopausal Women:Chemotherapy Associated Bone Loss   Change (%) in Bone Density

Shapiro, C, Manola, J, LeBoff ,M, J Clin Oncol 2001 Jul 15;19(14):3306‐11.

6.0 12.0 24.0-10.0

-7.5

-5.0

-2.5

0.0

Normal

Loss of OvarianFunction++

**

++ P=0.05** P<0.003

**

Months

Sp

ine

Bo

ne

Den

sity

% C

han

ge

Page 13: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

13

7.7%          Ovarian failure secondary to chemotherapy

~4‐6.0%    Gonadotropin‐releasing hormone agonist 

2.6%

1.0%     

Yearly Bone Loss Associated with Breast  Cancer Therapies

Lumbar spine BMD loss at 1 year (%)

Hashimoto 1995, Kanis 1997, Eastell 2006, Shapiro 2001

2%    (range 1‐3%)  Early menopausal women

Aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy

Late menopausal women

10.7%        Ovarian failure from Oophorectomy (premenopausal)

• Oral Estrogen and Progesterone

• Transdermal Estrogen

• Discontinuation of Hormone Therapy

• Selective Estrogen Modulator

Menopausal Estrogen and Bone 

Page 14: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

14

Women’s Health Initiative :Hormone Study Design

Hysterectomy

Conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) 0.625 mg/d

Percent Change in Total Hip and Spine Bone Density in the WHI (Mean ± SEM)

Cauley, JA, et al., JAMA. 2003;290(13);1729‐38.

Page 15: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

15

Cauley, JA, et al., JAMA. 2003;290(13);1729‐38.

Effects of Estrogen and Progesterone on Fractures in the WHI: Kaplan‐Meier Estimates

Hormone Replacement Therapy and Osteoporosis Studies 

Outcome by HRT Use Relative Risk or                 Type of StudyChange From Baseline

Non‐spine fracturesCurrent 0.73 Meta‐analysis (22 trials)Hip fracturesCurrent 0.64       CohortEver 0.76   CohortWrist fracturesCurrent 0.39 CohortEver 0.44 CohortSpine fracturesEver 0.60 CohortBone density change %Lumbar spine 6.98 (5.53‐8.43) Meta‐analysis(18trials)Femoral neck 4.07 (3.30‐4.84) Meta‐analysis (8 trials)Forearm 4.53 (3.68‐5.36) Meta‐analysis(14trials)

Nelson, H et al., JAMA 2002  Aug 21;288(7):872‐81.

Page 16: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

16

Women’s Health Initiative: Estrogen and Progesterone for 5.2 Years(n=16,608)

RISK

Breast Cancer 26% Increased Risk

Stroke  41% Increased Risk

Heart Attack 29% increased risk

Benefit

Osteoporosis 33% reduction spine and hip fracture

24% reduction in all fractures

Colon Cancer 37% reduction

Effects of Estrogen Plus Progestin on WHI Global Index Assessment of Risk‐Benefit:  Overall Results

Number of Women with a 

First Global In

dex Event

*Global index events include: coronary heart disease, stroke, pulmonary embolism, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, colorectal cancer, hip fracture, and death due to other causes.

Writing Group for the Women’s Health Initiative.  JAMA. 2002; 288:321‐333

RH= 1.15 (95% CI=1.03 ‐ 1.28)

Page 17: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

17

Summary: WHI Bone Density and Fracture Study

• Estrogen plus Progestin increases BMD and reduces the risk of fracture in healthy pre‐dominantly non‐osteoporotic women.

• Decreased risk of fracture in women at low, medium, and high risk for fracture 

• The effect of Estrogen and Progestin on the Global Index did not differ across levels of fracture risk.  There was no evidence of a net benefit in women at high risk of fracture

Cauley, JA, et al., JAMA. 2003;290(13);1729‐38Manson, JE, et al., JAMA. 2013;310(13):1353‐1368 

Hormone Replacement Therapy Falls Out of Favor with Expert 

Committee

JAMA, April 17, 2002 ‐ Vol. 287, No. 15

Page 18: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

18

Greendale GA et al., Arch Intern Med. 2002;162(6):665‐672. 

Effects of Stopping Oral Estrogen and Progesterone Therapy

Postmenopausal Estrogen/ Progestin Interventions (PEPI‐RCT) Study

• 45‐64 years old between 1‐10 years postmenopause

• n=847

4 treatment regimens:• unopposed oral conjugated equine estrogen• conjugated equine estrogen + 2.5mg ofmedroxyprogesterone acetate

• conjugated equine estrogen + 10mg of cyclicalmedroxyprogesterone acetate taken on days 1‐12each month

• Conjugated equine estrogen + 200mg of cyclicalmicronized progesterone taken on days 1‐12 eachmonth

Risks of fractures in the WHI: Post‐intervention

Heiss G et al., JAMA. 2008;299(9):1036‐1045.

• Post‐intervention in the Estrogen and Progesteronoeand Estrogen alone fracture reduction was attenuated

• A persistent hip fracture benefit was present with 13 years of follow‐up in the women assigned to E+P HR 0.81 (0.68‐0.97)

Manson, JE, et al., JAMA. 2013;310(13):1353‐1368 

Page 19: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

19

Low‐dose and Transdermal Estrogen 

• Low dose oral combined hormone replacement therapy (.3 mg premarin) increased bone mass 2.7% over 2 years (Gambacciani et al., Am J Ob Gyn 2001)

• Transdermal estrogen increases bone density and has minimal effects on inflammation and the liver parameters  (Shifren, J. et al., J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008)

• Data from randomized, controlled studies using transdermal estrogen on fracture risk needed 

Ettinger B, et al., Obstetrics and gynecology. 2004;104(3):443‐51. 

Effects of Ultralow‐dose Transdermal Estradiol on BMD in Postmenopausal Women

-------- placebo_____ estradiol

-------- placebo_____ estradiol

Ultra‐Low‐dose Transdermal estrogen Assessment (ULTRA) RCT

• 60‐80 years old, 5  years postmenopause 

• n=417

• Intervention: placebo vs. 0.25mg/destradiol for 2 yrs

Page 20: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

20

Menopausal Symptoms

• For moderate to severe symptoms of menopause (and prevention of bone loss)‐Transdermal estrogen and oral micronized progesterone

• Other approaches: ‐Soy, clonidine (patch or pill), black cohash, Antidepressant medications (SSRI/NSRIs), gabapentin, progesterone

Estrogen Raloxifene

HO

OH

OHHO S

O

ON

Structure  of Estrogen and Raloxifene

Page 21: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

21

Raloxifene 

• Reduces bone loss

• Reduces spine but not non‐spine (hip fractures)

• No increased cardiac risk  (JAMA 2002)

• Decreases invasive breast cancer risk

• Side effects: Hot flashes, blood clots

• Indication: Prevention and treatment of osteoporosis

Recommendations for All Adults

• Calcium intake of 1000 to 1200 mg/day, and vitamin D  (600 to 1000 IU/day)

• Regular weight‐bearing and muscle‐strengthening exercises

• Reduce the risk of falls and fractures

• Avoid cigarette smoking or excessive alcohol intake

Page 22: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

22

Calcium Adults and Required Calcium

Dietary Reference Intakes, Institute of Medicine 2011

Who(years)

Men Women Pregnant/Lactating

Upper Calcium Limit

9‐18 years 1300mg 1300mg 1300mg 3000mg

19‐50 years

1000mg 1000mg 1000mg 2500mg

51‐70 years

1000mg 1200mg 2000mg

71+ years 1200mg 1200mg 2000mg

FDA‐Approved Pharmacologic Osteoporosis Therapies

Antiresorptives (reduce bone breakdown):

• Bisphosphonates 

• Estrogen agonists/antagonists, also called SERMs

• Estrogen/Hormone Therapy (prevention)

• Estrogen and SERM: conjugated estrogens and bazedoxifene (prevention) (Med. Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Apr 28;56(1441):33‐4.)

• Human monoclonal antibody to RANK‐ligand

• Calcitonin

Anabolic (increase bone formation):

• Teriparatide (PTH (1‐34)

Page 23: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

23

FDA‐Approved Drug Therapies: Fracture Reductions 

ET/HT = estrogen therapy/hormonal therapy.

Spine Hip Nonspine

Alendronate X X X

Risedronate X X X

Ibandronate X

Zoledronic acid X X X

ET/HT X X X

Raloxifene X

Denosumab X X X

Teriparatide X X

Calcitonin X

STRONG MINDS,

STRONG BODIES,

STRONG BONESMassachusetts Department of Public Health

Osteoporosis 2002

Page 24: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

24

Questions?

THANK YOU 

Page 25: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

25

Assess risk factors and measure bone density in adults with risk factors

FRAX: 10‐year probability of major fractures 20% or higher or hip fracture 3% or higher

Fragility fracture at the hip, spine, 

humerus, and some wrist fractures

Osteoporosis with T‐score −2.5 or lower

Treatment Initiation for Postmenopausal Women and Men ≥50 Years

Treatment Initiation for Postmenopausal Women and Men ≥50 Years

Osteopenia: T‐score between −1.0 and −2.5

Siris ES, Adler R, Bilezikian J, et al. Osteoporos Int: 2014 May; 25(5):1439‐43; Cosman F, de Beur SJ, LeBoff MS, et al. Osteoporos Int: 2014 Oct;25(10):2359‐81

Who Should Have A Bone Density Test

Women and Men

Vertebral deformity osteoporotic fracture

Hyperparathyroidism

Glucocorticoid therapy (>7.5 mg/d)>3 months

Monitor response to therapy

Medical necessity

Women

Age 50 with >1 risk factor

Women: > 65 and older

Men: > 70 yrs and older*

Medicare mandated coverage, 1998; (* not mandated)

Page 26: Outline - Massachusetts Medical Society

04/21/2017

26

Effective Low‐Dose Hormones for Treating Vasomotor Symptoms in Postmenopausal Women

Manufacturer’s EffectiveRecommended Lower Initial Dose, mg                Dose, mg

EstrogensConjugated estrogens (Premarin)                               2000‐present                                    0.625                  0.3

Esterified estrogens (Estratab)               1.25                 0.3‐0.625Oral estradiol (Estrace, generics)           1‐2                      0.5Transdermal estradiol* (Estraderm)     0.05‐0.1 0.02‐0.025

CombinationPrempro 0.625                 0.3                  Conjugated estrogens with                     2.5                      1.5medroxyprogesterone

*Transdermal estradiol is about 20 times more potent that oral estradiol; 0.05 mg of transdermal

estradiol = 1 mg/day of oral estradiol Cohen J, JAMWA 2002