2
1117 small group of students. From teacher to examiner was a relatively small step. He was a member of the Royal College of Surgeons court of examiners from 1945 to 1951, and then examiner in surgery to the Universities of London, Cambridge, and Edinburgh. He was never really happy in the NHS and for many years retained his honorary status. He was a prime mover in the Fellowship for the Freedom of Medicine since he believed that private practice would help to preserve the direct doctor/patient relationship that was being eroded by case conferences and by the delegation of decision making to juniors. Gardham published infrequently, but his masterly contribution to Rowland and Turner’s Modern Operative Surgery led on to joint editorship of Operations of Surgery in two volumes. He became a member of the Surgical Travellers Club and was seldom absent from its meetings at home and abroad. Gardham’s great loves were always horses, horsemanship, and hunting. He was a member of the Devon and Somerset Stag Hounds and would often slip away from London to spend Saturday in the saddle on Exmoor. In retirement, he hunted two or three times a week and served as secretary to the Hunt. His other great interest in retirement was the little parish church near his home at Oare where he was church- warden for years. He married Audrey Carr, a general practitioner. They had a son and two daughters, who are all practising doctors. D. R. D. CECIL JAMES WATSON MD, PhD Minnesota Dr Watson, formerly head of the department of medicine, University of Minnesota, and director of medical education, Abbott-North-Western Hospital, Minneapolis, died on April 11, aged 81. He was born and educated in Minneapolis, where he graduated from the University’s medical school in 1926. He received a PhD in pathology and haematology in 1928. In 1930-32 he worked in Munich with Prof Hans Fischer and succeeded there in the first crystallisation of stercobilin. An interest and skill in research of bile pigments and porphyrins con- tinued all his life. In 1941 he described, with Samuel Schwartz, a simple test for urinary porphobi- linogen, now bearing their names. In 1951 he devised a useful classi- fication of the porphyrias according to the major site of disturbed haem synthesis. His lifework was crowned in 1971 with his discovery of haematin as a treatment for attacks of inducible porphyria. He published almost 350 papers cover- ing a range of scientific and philosophical aspects of medicine and he contributed to many medical textbooks. Among his several accolades were honorary degrees from the University of Mainz and Munich, membership of the National Academy of Sciences, and the Kober medal of the Association of American Physicians. He was deeply involved in the American Board of Internal Medicine, where his opinion was highly respected. The American College of Physicians made him a Master. One of the last honours bestowed on him was fellowship of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. His interests went beyond his patients, his students, and his laboratory. His linguistic skills allowed him to enjoy Thomas Mann and Hermann Hesse in German. He loved the out-of-doors and often returned to his family’s island in Canada. It is said that he introduced skiing to America’s upper midwest when he returned from Munich in 1932. His wife, a companion for almost 60 years, survives him. - C. A. P. A memorial service for the late Mr JOE PENNYBACKER will be held in St Giles’ Church, Oxford, on Saturday, June 11, at 11.30 am. Notes and News HEALTH MEASURES IN ETHIOPIA FEARS have been expressed that Ethiopia is about to suffer a famine comparable to the one which hit the country in 1973, when 100 000 people were reported to have died. After a poor harvest last year and drought affecting much of northern Ethiopia, the population has benefited from a Government programme of monthly food distribution, which has enabled many people to remain in their own villages. Surveys in the drought-stricken villages of Gondar province indicated that children had retained an adequate nutritional status and there were no cases of measles. A minority of the population have been transferred to relief camps where they are exposed to a distressingly familiar pattern of disease. Overcrowding, inadequate shelter, poor supplies of water, and lack of sanitation all add to the risk of communicable disease. In Ebinat, the main relief centre of Gondar province, measles has spread rapidly through the camp. Water is brought to the camp by tanker from a stream 4 km away, and, although the source is more or less unpolluted, water is limited to a few litres a day per person. Medical services are provided primarily by the Ethiopian Ministry of Health, with assistance in Gondar and Wollo from Oxfam and Save the Children Fund. The distribution of food has prevented a major deterioration in health for the majority of people remaining in their villages, and this programme must continue until at least October when the next harvest is due. Until then, a primary objective of relief agencies must be to establish preventive measures of health care in the camps, and to encourage as many people as possible to remain in their own homes. LOCAL PROJECTS FOR DRUG MISUSERS GUIDELINES are available for bodies wishing to apply for grants to develop local projects under the Government’s 6 million initiative to help drug misusers. The guidelines have been circulated to health and local authorities, voluntary and professional organisations, and individuals who have expressed interest in the scheme. Mr Norman Fowler, Secretary of State for Social Services, said in Parliament on April 28 that the money should be spent on local projects, such as walk-in centres for addicts not presently undergoing treatment, hostels, half-way houses, and rehabilitation centres in the community. He added that money could also be spent on training extra personnel to help addicts, such as psychiatric nurses. Applications for the first round of grants should be received by the Department of Health and Social Security by July 29 and the Department should respond within 6 weeks. HA YFEVER AND EXAMS AN estimated four million working days are lost through hayfever in the United Kingdom during the peak months of early summer. The disorder is commonest in between the ages of 15 and 25. The effects on students taking examinations in early summer have been studied by Dr Tom Smith and Dr Peter Borge in a surveyl of 514 0-level, A-level, and degree examination candidates (known to have hayfever) in schools and universities in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland (Scotland was excluded because school examinations are held there before the peak hayfever season). The study confirmed that May, June, and July are the months when students are most affected (50%, 83%, and 59%, respectively, of the study population affected). Most students did not consult their doctors until May or June. When asked about the response to prescribed treatment (in the broad categories of tablets, inhalers, or injections, with the actual drugs not specified), most said that tablets were their preferred method of treatment, but tablets were more likely to cause side-effects. 18% of students mentioned drowsiness as a side-effect of treatment and its frequency was greater for the 1. Sponsored by Merrell Pharmaceuticals Limited, Meadowbank, Bath Road, Hounslow, Middlesex TW5 9QY.

Notes and News

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: Notes and News

1117

small group of students. From teacher to examiner was a relativelysmall step. He was a member of the Royal College of Surgeons courtof examiners from 1945 to 1951, and then examiner in surgery to theUniversities of London, Cambridge, and Edinburgh. He was neverreally happy in the NHS and for many years retained his honorarystatus. He was a prime mover in the Fellowship for the Freedom ofMedicine since he believed that private practice would help topreserve the direct doctor/patient relationship that was beingeroded by case conferences and by the delegation of decision makingto juniors. Gardham published infrequently, but his masterlycontribution to Rowland and Turner’s Modern Operative Surgeryled on to joint editorship of Operations of Surgery in two volumes.He became a member of the Surgical Travellers Club and was

seldom absent from its meetings at home and abroad. Gardham’sgreat loves were always horses, horsemanship, and hunting. He wasa member of the Devon and Somerset Stag Hounds and would oftenslip away from London to spend Saturday in the saddle on Exmoor.In retirement, he hunted two or three times a week and served assecretary to the Hunt. His other great interest in retirement was thelittle parish church near his home at Oare where he was church-warden for years.He married Audrey Carr, a general practitioner. They had a son

and two daughters, who are all practising doctors.D. R. D.

CECIL JAMES WATSONMD, PhD Minnesota

Dr Watson, formerly head of the department of medicine,University of Minnesota, and director of medical education,Abbott-North-Western Hospital, Minneapolis, died on April11, aged 81.He was born and educated in Minneapolis, where he graduated

from the University’s medical school in 1926. He received a PhD inpathology and haematology in 1928. In 1930-32 he worked in

Munich with Prof Hans Fischerand succeeded there in the first

crystallisation of stercobilin. Aninterest and skill in research of bile

pigments and porphyrins con-

tinued all his life. In 1941 he

described, with Samuel Schwartz, asimple test for urinary porphobi-linogen, now bearing their names.In 1951 he devised a useful classi-fication of the porphyrias accordingto the major site of disturbed haemsynthesis. His lifework was

crowned in 1971 with his discoveryof haematin as a treatment forattacks of inducible porphyria. Hepublished almost 350 papers cover-

ing a range of scientific and philosophical aspects of medicine and hecontributed to many medical textbooks.

Among his several accolades were honorary degrees from theUniversity of Mainz and Munich, membership of the NationalAcademy of Sciences, and the Kober medal of the Association ofAmerican Physicians. He was deeply involved in the AmericanBoard of Internal Medicine, where his opinion was highlyrespected. The American College of Physicians made him a Master.One of the last honours bestowed on him was fellowship of theRoyal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.His interests went beyond his patients, his students, and his

laboratory. His linguistic skills allowed him to enjoy Thomas Mannand Hermann Hesse in German. He loved the out-of-doors andoften returned to his family’s island in Canada. It is said that heintroduced skiing to America’s upper midwest when he returnedfrom Munich in 1932.

His wife, a companion for almost 60 years, survives him.-

C. A. P.

A memorial service for the late Mr JOE PENNYBACKER will be heldin St Giles’ Church, Oxford, on Saturday, June 11, at 11.30 am.

Notes and News

HEALTH MEASURES IN ETHIOPIA

FEARS have been expressed that Ethiopia is about to suffer afamine comparable to the one which hit the country in 1973, when100 000 people were reported to have died. After a poor harvest lastyear and drought affecting much of northern Ethiopia, the

population has benefited from a Government programme of

monthly food distribution, which has enabled many people toremain in their own villages. Surveys in the drought-strickenvillages of Gondar province indicated that children had retained anadequate nutritional status and there were no cases of measles.A minority of the population have been transferred to relief camps

where they are exposed to a distressingly familiar pattern of disease.Overcrowding, inadequate shelter, poor supplies of water, and lackof sanitation all add to the risk of communicable disease. In Ebinat,the main relief centre of Gondar province, measles has spreadrapidly through the camp. Water is brought to the camp by tankerfrom a stream 4 km away, and, although the source is more or lessunpolluted, water is limited to a few litres a day per person. Medicalservices are provided primarily by the Ethiopian Ministry ofHealth, with assistance in Gondar and Wollo from Oxfam and Savethe Children Fund. The distribution of food has prevented a majordeterioration in health for the majority of people remaining in theirvillages, and this programme must continue until at least Octoberwhen the next harvest is due. Until then, a primary objective ofrelief agencies must be to establish preventive measures of healthcare in the camps, and to encourage as many people as possible toremain in their own homes.

LOCAL PROJECTS FOR DRUG MISUSERS

GUIDELINES are available for bodies wishing to apply for grants todevelop local projects under the Government’s 6 million initiativeto help drug misusers. The guidelines have been circulated to healthand local authorities, voluntary and professional organisations, andindividuals who have expressed interest in the scheme. Mr NormanFowler, Secretary of State for Social Services, said in Parliament onApril 28 that the money should be spent on local projects, such aswalk-in centres for addicts not presently undergoing treatment,hostels, half-way houses, and rehabilitation centres in the

community. He added that money could also be spent on trainingextra personnel to help addicts, such as psychiatric nurses.

Applications for the first round of grants should be received by theDepartment of Health and Social Security by July 29 and theDepartment should respond within 6 weeks.

HA YFEVER AND EXAMS

AN estimated four million working days are lost through hayfeverin the United Kingdom during the peak months of early summer.The disorder is commonest in between the ages of 15 and 25. Theeffects on students taking examinations in early summer have beenstudied by Dr Tom Smith and Dr Peter Borge in a surveyl of 5140-level, A-level, and degree examination candidates (known to havehayfever) in schools and universities in England, Wales, andNorthern Ireland (Scotland was excluded because schoolexaminations are held there before the peak hayfever season). Thestudy confirmed that May, June, and July are the months whenstudents are most affected (50%, 83%, and 59%, respectively, of thestudy population affected). Most students did not consult theirdoctors until May or June. When asked about the response toprescribed treatment (in the broad categories of tablets, inhalers, orinjections, with the actual drugs not specified), most said that tabletswere their preferred method of treatment, but tablets were morelikely to cause side-effects. 18% of students mentioned drowsinessas a side-effect of treatment and its frequency was greater for the

1. Sponsored by Merrell Pharmaceuticals Limited, Meadowbank, Bath Road, Hounslow,Middlesex TW5 9QY.

Page 2: Notes and News

1118

higher examinations. Twice as many 0-level as A-level and degreecandidates had chronic hayfever (onset before age 6).The new pollen count forecast from the National Pollen and Hay

Fever Bureau may allow patients who are prescribed medication toplan how best to take it. There are twenty count stations fromAberdeen to Exeter which will provide daily counts from late Mayonwards. Forecasts will be issued through various publicinformation channels, but questions can be asked at any regionalcount station or at the Bureau’s headquarters, 112 Thorpe Road,Norwich (tel: 0603 29301).

BRITISH QUALIFICATIONS FOR HEALTH-CAREPROFESSIONS

MORE than five hundred British qualifications are relevant to acareer in health care. A new directoryl identifies which applies towhich profession, which are registrable, and how training can besecured. The first part of the compendium consists of articles onBritish qualifications in medicine, nursing, and the related

professions, problems for overseas students, learning English forspecific purposes, and on-the-job training. The second part givessome basic careers information, profession by profession, and a listof the qualifications available. Part III contains course information,such as entry requirements, length of course, and where courses areheld, and part IV supplies an index of abbreviations and

qualifications, notes on statutory examining bodies, and a list ofuseful addresses.

LIVING WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE

THE management of Parkinson’s disease should include, as well asthe first-line drug treatment, various physical therapies. This pointis emphasised in a booklet from the Parkinson’s Disease Society, 2which has sections on the improvement of mobility and speech andon aids to daily living. The booklet is addressed to patients and givessimple and clear instructions accompanied by line-drawingsillustrating both how to do the exercises and how not to do them.

International Conference on Oral Rehydration TherapyThe US Agency for International Development, the International

Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, the UnitedNations International Children’s Fund, and the World HealthOrganisation’s Diarrhoeal Diseases Control Programme are to holda major international conference on oral rehydration therapy inWashington, DC, on June 7-10. A detailed agenda may be obtainedfrom Mary Beth Allen, ICORT Conference Staff, Room 3534, NewState, Agency for International Development, Washington DC20523 (tel: 202 632 0226).

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of GlasgowDr Norman Shumway (University of Stanford, California), Dr

William Morris (Minister, Glasgow Cathedral), and Mr DavidWalton (chairman, Scottish Metropolitan Ltd) have been madehonorary fellows of the College.

Registry of In-vitro Fertilisation

As an initial step in founding an interest group in in-vitrofertilisation and embryo transfer, it has been decided to establish aregistry of in-vitro fertilisation programmes. Those who wish totake part may send a short statement, including the starting date ofthe programme, the name of its director, and the list of team

members, to: In Vitro Fertilization Registry, Department ofObstetrics and Gynecology, Mount Sinai Hospital Medical Centerof Chicago, California Avenue at 15th Street, Chicago, IL 60608,USA. Participation in such a registered programme would makeindividuals eligible for membership in the interest group.

1. The Directory of Schools of Medicine and Nursing. British Qualifications andTraining in Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing and Related Professions. Edited byLaidon Alexander. London: Kogan Page, on behalf of International HospitalsGroup. 1983. Pp 712 £14.95.

2. Living with Parkinson’s Disease by Sue Franklyn, Alison Perry, and Alison Beattie.Available from the Parkinson’s Disease Society, 36 Portland Place, London WIN3DG, price £1.00 (please mark envelope Exercises).

Marie Stopes Research FundThe Eugenics Society invites applications from those seeking

support for research on fertility control; differential fertility; the eugenic aspects of reproduction and population; and the eugenicaspects of sex education and sexual behaviour, and the impact of ,

such matters on the welfare of women and of the community, withemphasis on interdisciplinary research. Details are available fromthe General Secretary, Eugenics Society, 69 Eccleston Square,London SW1V 1PJ (01-834 2091).

Applications are invited for the Intensive Care Society 1984 travellingfellowship of f2000, which is open to any medical practitioner working in theUK who intends to continue working in the NHS and who would like to visitan intensive care unit abroad. Application forms may be obtained from DrS. M. Willatts, Frenchay Hospital, Bristol BS16 ILE (0272 565656 ext251/252).A one-day course on Uro-nephrology in Pregnancy will be held at the

Institute of Urology, London, on Friday, May 20. Details are available fromthe Course Secretary, Institute of Urology, 172 Shaftesbury Avenue, LondonWC2 (01-836 5361 ext 30).A one-day meeting on the Microchip in Medicine-Problems and

Prospects will take place at the Royal Society of Medicine, London, onThursday, June 2. Requests for tickets should be addressed to Dr D. M.Burley, c/o the Royal Society of Medicine, 1 Wimpole Street, London WIM8AE.

A series of lectures on Update in Cancer Management will be held at thePostgraduate Centre, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey, at 5.30 pm onThursdays (June 2, June 16, June 30, July 7, and July 28 and resuming mSeptember). Further information may be obtained from Prof M. J. Peckham,Radiotherapy Section, Clinical Academic Unit, Royal Marsden Hospital,Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (01-642 6011 ext 266).

Diary of the WeekMAY 15 TO 21

Monday, 16thROYAL COLLEGE OF PATHOLOGISTS, 2 Carlton House Terrace, London

SW1F 5AF5.30 PM Dr J. C. Wagner: The Biological Effects of Mineral Fibres (34th Kettle

memonal lecture).INSTITUTE OF DERMATOLOGY, St John’s Hospital for Diseases of the Skm, Lisle

Street, Leicester Square, London WC2H 7BJ4.45 PM Prof A. Breathnach: Aspects of the Embryology of Human Skin.

INSTITUTE OF LARYNGOLOGY AND OTOLOGY, Royal National Throat, Noseand Ear Hospital, 330/332 Gray’s Inn Road, London WCIX 8EE

5.30 PM Dr A. Kobza Black: Skin and the Ears, Nose and Throat.ST GEORGE’S HOSPITAL MEDICAL SCHOOL, 3rd Floor, Lanesborough Wing,

Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 ORE12.30 PM Dr Elaine Lynch: Gynaecologists and Psychosex.

Wednesday, 18thINSTITUTE OF ORTHOPAEDICS, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, 234 Great

Portland Street, London WIN 6AD6 PM Mr R. W. Porter: Neurogenic Claudication.7 PM Dr A. Young: Physiological Basts and Application of Electro-diagnosis

WELLCOME INSTITUTE FOR THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE, 183 Euston

Road, London NW 2BP5.30 PM Dr Joan Lane: ’The Doctor Scolds Me...’ The Journal and Correspondence

of Patients in 18th Century England.LONDON MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY GROUP

6 PM (Department of Community Medicine, University College, 88 Chenies Mews,London WC1) Ms Mary Ann Elston: The Work of 19th Century WomenDoctors.

NORTHWICK PARK HOSPITAL AND CLINICAL RESEARCH CENTRE,Watford Road, Harrow, Middlesex HA1 3UJ

I PM Dr Mark Levy: A Difficult Case.4.30 PM Prof P. R. F. Bell: Islet Cell Transplantation.

Thursday, 19thROYAL SOCIETY OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE, Manson House,

26 Portland Place, London WIN 4EY6 PM ProfD. H. Simpson, Dr C. R. Howard, Mr G Lloyd and Drj. C. S Clegg Lassa

and Its Relatives.ST MARY’S HOSPITAL MEDICAL SCHOOL, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG

5.30 PM Dr B. Lieberman: Changing Trends in Perinatal Mortality.MANCHESTER MEDICAL SOCIETY

7 PM (Four Seasons Hotel, Hale) Dr E. B. Lewis: Slaving Over a Hot Boyle’s Machine

Friday, 20thROYAL COLLEGE OF RADIOLOGISTS, 66 Portland Place, London WIN 3DG4.30 PM Sir Richard Doll: Prospects for the Prevention of Cancer (27th Crookshank

lecture).KING’S COLLEGE HOSPITAL MEDICAL SCHOOL, Denmark Hill, London SE54.30 PM ProfG. Westbury: Soft Tissue Sarcoma (18th Dorothy Platt memorial lecture)