1
1191 next day I saw him-less than twenty-four hours after- wards,-he was sitting up in bed playing. His temperature and pulse were almost normal ; he had had a good night, with a fair amount of natural sleep and no delirium, and on examining the throat I found only a few patches of the membrane left. The following day the child, with the exception of a little debility, seemed perfectly well, and there was absolutely no appearance of any membrane on the fauces. He was out of bed, sitting by the fire and taking his food well. My father, Mr. J. B. Uurgenven, wrote a letter to one of your contemporaries some months ago, giving the result of the use of eucalyptus in scarlatina, and also read a paper on the same subject before the Epi- demiological Society, but I think it has been tried only by very few medical men. Seeing what marvellous results it has given, I cannot help being surprised that since then it has not been more extensively tried. Now that small-pox has lost its virulence, there is no disease more dreaded than diphtheria., and I verily believe that eucalyptus will be as valuable a remedy against diphtheria and scarlet fever as vaccination is against small-pox.-Hoping that I am not too far intruding on your valuable space, I am, Sirs, yours truly, J. SADLER CURGENVEN, M.R.C.S, L.R.C.P., L.S.A. Craven-hill-gardens, W., Nov. 5th, 1890. I ** The remedy is not a new one in diphtheria; it was advocated by Professor Mosler eleven years ago, and has often been used by others. Nor can we think our corre- spondent’s admittedly small experience justifies such con- clusions a’9 be draws from it.-ED. L. ENTERIC FEVER IN INDIA. . To the Editors of THE LANCET, SIRs,-The question of enteric fever in India is of scien- tific rather than statistical importance. In my endeavour to express a courteous dissent from the opinions of others I fell into an error which I did not foresee. Dr. Edward Squire in his generous and lenient criticism placed what I now see to be the most probable construction on the mean- ing of my words, but, nevertheless, one the very opposite to the view I intended to convey. I wrote that there were two varieties of enteric fever in India, or, I would prefer to say, enteric fever and enteroid fever. I made use of the word " enteroid " to imply that the disease in many ,respects resembled enteric fever. To have expressed my meaning correctly I ought to have written that the cases which are diagnosed as enteric fever are of two classes, one of which is indisputably enteric fever, whilst the other is not enteric fever at all. As a further development of the subject I would state my opinion that :-Enteric fever exists as in England; enteric fever exists as in England, but associated with malaria, and that this is the only fever to which the term " typho-malaria " is applicable. Remittent fever exists, which may be mistaken for enteric fever. A distinct disease exists which is sometimes called remittent, but more often enteric fever, but which is neither one nor the other. The main feature which distinguishes this last disease is the absence of any enlargement of the spleen unless the patient’s constitution is impregnated with the poison of malaria, in which case the spleen is already enlarged.&mdash;I am, Sirs, your obedient servant, G. SHERMAN BIGG, F.R.C.S. Ed. 16th 1890 u. njLjBi*L-< Victoria-street, S.W., Nov. 16th, 1890. NORTHERN COUNTIES NOTES. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) Handsome Gift to the Newcastle College of Medicine. I HEAR that Mr. Stephen Scott of Harrogate, formerly ,of Newcastle, has given the sum of &pound; 1000 to the Newcastle College of Medicine, in connexion with the University of Durham, for the purpose of founding a scholarship to pro- mote the study of hernia and allied complaints, to be known as the "Stephen Scott Scholarship." Sanitary Matters in Newcastle. There is now a considerable amount of typhoid fever in Newcastle. Scarlet fever also has been largely notified. The number of fever cases at the Walker Hospital is also increasing. This is said to be in consequence of the hospital being looked upon with more favour, but I scarcely think that this expresses the whole truth. Mr. H. E. Arm- strong, the medical officer of health, has made a useful con- tribution to the data relating to the erection of workmen’s dwellings by compiling a series of answers to inquiries ad- dressed to corporations which have entered upon the build- ing of such dwellings. It appears the answers are satis- factory so far as showing that these dwellings are easily let and fully occupied, but it is also stated that the tenants are of a class which could easily find homes elsewhere. What is urgently wanted in Newcastle are rooms for the poorer classes of working people not able to pay more than five shillings a week. The Typhoid Fever Epidemic. on the Tees. Dr. Barry, the Government Commissioner, has visited Middlesbrough in the course of his investigations into the present outbreak of typhoid fever on the Tees, which, how- ever, is now abating. Dr. Barry, in company with Dr. Malcomson, has visited and inspected various parts of the town, and it is stated in the local papers that his report will not be issued before three months. Cumberland Hospital Sunday Fund. The Committee of the Cumberland Hospital Sunday Fund have issued their report, from which it appears that they have allocated 9750 this year, as follows :-Cumberland Infirmary, Carlisle, &pound;500 ; Carlisle Dispensary, Carlisle Fever Hospital, and Workington Infirmary, f50 each ; and the Silloth Convalescent Institution, &pound;160. The committee, in reference to some alterations in the system, assured those who had entrusted contributions to them that the greatesb pains would be taken to allocate the money wisely. Newcastle-on-Tyne, Nov. 26th. SCOTLAND. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENTS.) Royal Physical Society oj Edinburgh. LAST week the session of this Society was opened by the retiring address of the Vice-President, Dr. G. Sims Wood- head. The lecturer took for his subject "Science and Physic." He referred to the early history of the Society, and the part the medical profession bad taken in its estab- lishment, and also the work of its meetings. After giving an account of the present condition of the Society, he pro- ceeded to discuss the question of preventive inoculation and the views as to its mode of action. He also referred in detail to Koch’s recent work, and the interesting effect of the inoculation in that instance, judging from the published account by Koch himself. At the close of the address a hearty vote of thanks was given to Dr. Woodhead, and much pleasure was manifested by the members in seeing him amongst them again. The Morison Lectures. The third and last of these lectures was delivered by Dr. Clouston in the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, on Friday of last week. The lecturer dealt in the main with those affections which he regarded as allied to neurosis, and which occur during the period of development. The lectures have been well attended, and have been full of interest, although many of the views expressed are hardly likely to be accepted by practitioners in general. Edinburgh Health Lectures. Dr. George Mackay was the lecturer on Saturday last, and dealt with defects of vision, and drew special attention to the imperfect method of testing for colour- blindness by the Board of Trade and by the railway companies. Health of Edinburgh. The mortality last week was 89, and the death-rate 17 per 1000. Diseases of the chest caused 38 deaths, and zymotic diseases 6. The intimations for the week were 5 cases of typhoid, 15 of diphtheria, 24 of scarlatina, and 18 of measles. The Lord Rectorship of the University of Aberdeen. The polling for the election of a Lord Rector in room of Mr. Goschen, whose term of office has expired, took place at Marischal College on Saturday last. The result was that the Marquis of Huntly was elected by the votes of

NORTHERN COUNTIES NOTES

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

1191

next day I saw him-less than twenty-four hours after-wards,-he was sitting up in bed playing. His temperatureand pulse were almost normal ; he had had a good night,with a fair amount of natural sleep and no delirium, andon examining the throat I found only a few patches of themembrane left. The following day the child, with the

exception of a little debility, seemed perfectly well, andthere was absolutely no appearance of any membrane onthe fauces. He was out of bed, sitting by the fire andtaking his food well. My father, Mr. J. B. Uurgenven,wrote a letter to one of your contemporaries some monthsago, giving the result of the use of eucalyptus in scarlatina,and also read a paper on the same subject before the Epi-demiological Society, but I think it has been tried only byvery few medical men. Seeing what marvellous results ithas given, I cannot help being surprised that since then ithas not been more extensively tried. Now that small-poxhas lost its virulence, there is no disease more dreaded thandiphtheria., and I verily believe that eucalyptus will be asvaluable a remedy against diphtheria and scarlet fever asvaccination is against small-pox.-Hoping that I am nottoo far intruding on your valuable space,

I am, Sirs, yours truly,J. SADLER CURGENVEN, M.R.C.S, L.R.C.P., L.S.A.

Craven-hill-gardens, W., Nov. 5th, 1890. I -

** The remedy is not a new one in diphtheria; it wasadvocated by Professor Mosler eleven years ago, and hasoften been used by others. Nor can we think our corre-

spondent’s admittedly small experience justifies such con-clusions a’9 be draws from it.-ED. L.

ENTERIC FEVER IN INDIA.. To the Editors of THE LANCET,

SIRs,-The question of enteric fever in India is of scien-tific rather than statistical importance. In my endeavourto express a courteous dissent from the opinions of others Ifell into an error which I did not foresee. Dr. EdwardSquire in his generous and lenient criticism placed what Inow see to be the most probable construction on the mean-ing of my words, but, nevertheless, one the very oppositeto the view I intended to convey. I wrote that there weretwo varieties of enteric fever in India, or, I would prefer tosay, enteric fever and enteroid fever. I made use ofthe word " enteroid " to imply that the disease in many,respects resembled enteric fever. To have expressed mymeaning correctly I ought to have written that the caseswhich are diagnosed as enteric fever are of two classes, oneof which is indisputably enteric fever, whilst the other isnot enteric fever at all. As a further development of thesubject I would state my opinion that :-Enteric fever existsas in England; enteric fever exists as in England, butassociated with malaria, and that this is the only fever towhich the term " typho-malaria " is applicable. Remittentfever exists, which may be mistaken for enteric fever. Adistinct disease exists which is sometimes called remittent,but more often enteric fever, but which is neither one northe other. The main feature which distinguishes this lastdisease is the absence of any enlargement of the spleenunless the patient’s constitution is impregnated with thepoison of malaria, in which case the spleen is alreadyenlarged.&mdash;I am, Sirs, your obedient servant,

G. SHERMAN BIGG, F.R.C.S. Ed.16th 1890u. njLjBi*L-<

Victoria-street, S.W., Nov. 16th, 1890.

NORTHERN COUNTIES NOTES.

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

Handsome Gift to the Newcastle College of Medicine.I HEAR that Mr. Stephen Scott of Harrogate, formerly

,of Newcastle, has given the sum of &pound; 1000 to the NewcastleCollege of Medicine, in connexion with the University ofDurham, for the purpose of founding a scholarship to pro-mote the study of hernia and allied complaints, to be knownas the "Stephen Scott Scholarship."

Sanitary Matters in Newcastle.There is now a considerable amount of typhoid fever in

Newcastle. Scarlet fever also has been largely notified.The number of fever cases at the Walker Hospital is also

increasing. This is said to be in consequence of thehospital being looked upon with more favour, but I scarcelythink that this expresses the whole truth. Mr. H. E. Arm-

strong, the medical officer of health, has made a useful con-tribution to the data relating to the erection of workmen’sdwellings by compiling a series of answers to inquiries ad-dressed to corporations which have entered upon the build-ing of such dwellings. It appears the answers are satis-factory so far as showing that these dwellings are easily letand fully occupied, but it is also stated that the tenantsare of a class which could easily find homes elsewhere. Whatis urgently wanted in Newcastle are rooms for the poorerclasses of working people not able to pay more than fiveshillings a week.

The Typhoid Fever Epidemic. on the Tees.Dr. Barry, the Government Commissioner, has visited

Middlesbrough in the course of his investigations into thepresent outbreak of typhoid fever on the Tees, which, how-ever, is now abating. Dr. Barry, in company with Dr.Malcomson, has visited and inspected various parts of thetown, and it is stated in the local papers that his reportwill not be issued before three months.

Cumberland Hospital Sunday Fund.The Committee of the Cumberland Hospital Sunday Fund

have issued their report, from which it appears that theyhave allocated 9750 this year, as follows :-CumberlandInfirmary, Carlisle, &pound;500 ; Carlisle Dispensary, CarlisleFever Hospital, and Workington Infirmary, f50 each ; andthe Silloth Convalescent Institution, &pound;160. The committee,in reference to some alterations in the system, assured thosewho had entrusted contributions to them that the greatesbpains would be taken to allocate the money wisely.Newcastle-on-Tyne, Nov. 26th.

SCOTLAND.

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENTS.)

Royal Physical Society oj Edinburgh.LAST week the session of this Society was opened by the

retiring address of the Vice-President, Dr. G. Sims Wood-head. The lecturer took for his subject "Science andPhysic." He referred to the early history of the Society,and the part the medical profession bad taken in its estab-lishment, and also the work of its meetings. After givingan account of the present condition of the Society, he pro-ceeded to discuss the question of preventive inoculation andthe views as to its mode of action. He also referred indetail to Koch’s recent work, and the interesting effect ofthe inoculation in that instance, judging from the publishedaccount by Koch himself. At the close of the address ahearty vote of thanks was given to Dr. Woodhead, andmuch pleasure was manifested by the members in seeinghim amongst them again.

The Morison Lectures.The third and last of these lectures was delivered by Dr.

Clouston in the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh,on Friday of last week. The lecturer dealt in the mainwith those affections which he regarded as allied to

neurosis, and which occur during the period of development.The lectures have been well attended, and have been fullof interest, although many of the views expressed are hardlylikely to be accepted by practitioners in general.

Edinburgh Health Lectures.Dr. George Mackay was the lecturer on Saturday last,

and dealt with defects of vision, and drew special attentionto the imperfect method of testing for colour- blindness bythe Board of Trade and by the railway companies.

Health of Edinburgh.The mortality last week was 89, and the death-rate 17

per 1000. Diseases of the chest caused 38 deaths, andzymotic diseases 6. The intimations for the week were 5cases of typhoid, 15 of diphtheria, 24 of scarlatina, and 18of measles.

The Lord Rectorship of the University of Aberdeen.The polling for the election of a Lord Rector in room of

Mr. Goschen, whose term of office has expired, took placeat Marischal College on Saturday last. The result wasthat the Marquis of Huntly was elected by the votes of