1
958 small quantities at itn increased cost much hardship was inflicted upon them at a time when they were suffering ,great distress in consequence of the coal strike. A motion was submitted that coke should be supplied in small quan- tities from the Corporation gasworks at a reduced price, the understanding being that the reduction should last only so long as the existing distress continued. The resolution, how- ever, was not adopted, because of alleged difIiculty in dis- tinguishing between the really deserving poor and others who ’might take unfair advantage of the action of the Corporation. One thing, however, is certain-that unless either the coal strike comes to an end very shortly or the weather remains ’mild and temperate until an unusually late period of the year, the present coal famine will cause terrible distress in Manchester, and it is difficult to see how this can be ’averted by the proposed action of the Corporation. Soup (kitchens and other movements for the relief of distress amongst the families of the colliers on strike have been in ,operation for some weeks past, and large numbers of men .and women out of work have been perambulating the streets in the suburbs asking for subscriptions and representing that great distress prevails amongst the whole fraternity of - colliers. Oct. loth. LIVERPOOL. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) Reception at the Town Hall to Hospital Physicians and Surgeons and Nurses. THE Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress entertained at the - town-ban, on two evenings during the last week of September, the physicians and surgeons at nearly all the hospitals, the mirses being also invited. It was a sight as pleasing as it was novel, and it is to be hoped that it will not be the last - entertainment of the kind. The suite of rooms at the Liver- pool town-hall is said to be the finest in the kingdom, and it is surprising how many persons, who have lived and laboured in this city for many years, have never had an opportunity of seeing them. On each of the two evenings 300 nurses were .present, the uniform dresses forming a pleasing variety, and a very agreeable evening was spent in each instance. The lives of those who work in hospitals are somewhat monotonous, and to those who were present it was an occasion to be remembered. Opening of the Winter Session at the Medical Institution. The first meeting at the Medical Institution for the present session took place on Thursday, the 5th inst., when 150 members and associates were present. The President, Dr. Glynn, delivered an address on Excessive Mental Excitement and some of its Causes. It was a very able address and was very well received. Oct. llth. ______________ NORTHERN COUNTIES NOTES. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) Tyne Port Sanitary Authority and Cholera Precautions. AT the last meeting of the Tyne sanitary authority it was stated that the Norwegian Consul had made application for .E5, being the cost of a seaman’s clothes which had been - destroyed after his death from cholera. This was allowed after some discussion, on the understanding that it was not to be made a precedent ; but if the authority could destroy ’every cholera-infected suit of clothes in their river at a cost of .E5 each it could not be considered extravagant by any reasonable person. There is a time for economy, but the ’expenditure of a few pounds to prevent a plague from obtain- ing a footing in the country might be prudent. Probably the 95 which was paid represented this sailor’s whole effects, for seamen have rarely more clothes than they stand up in. The report of the medical officer of health showed that for two ’months there had been only one case of Asiatic cholera- namely, that on board the Jeannie, which was reported some time ago. There had been several cases of diarrhoea, but none were of a very serious character. It was stated that the late cholera precautions had cost the authority B135. At the last meeting of the sanitary committee typhoid fever was reported to be prevalent at Middlesbrough. The death- rate was high-viz,, nearly 39 per 1000, against 24 per 1000 at the corresponding period of last year. The epidemic of diarrhcr,a had continued, causing 41 deaths, mostly amongst children, but there had been two deaths from this canse in adults. Bequests &c. Miss Dorothy Burnup, late of Newcastle-on-Tyne, left about C4000 to local and other charities, including the Newcastle Royal Infirmary. The late Mr. Lupton W. Dawson of Wood Cottage, Baildon, left nearly £24,000 to charitable institutions-the Sir Titus Salt’s Hospital, Saltaire, Ilkley Hospital and Bath Hospital, Harrogate, each receiving £4000, whilst the Bradford Eye and Ear Infirmary and the Bradford Institution for the Blind benefit to the extent of .E2000 each. The friends and supporters of the Northern Counties Institution for the Blind at Newcastle will be pleased to learn that the Duke of Northumberland has forwarded :f500 towards its building extension fund, and that Earl Percy has contributed E50 towards the same object. The fifth quinquennial festival of the Royal Albert Asylum for Idiots and Imbeciles of the Northern Counties will be held at Lancaster this year and will take place on the 13th inst. The Prevalence of Typhoid Fever in Durham County. Typhoid fever is reported to be prevalent in the Washing. ton, Usworth and Houghton districts of Durham. In some houses as many as three patients, mostly young people, are suffering from the malady. Liberality oj Elswick Workmen. The workmen at Elswick during the past three months con- tributed nearly E300 to the Royal Infirmary and other medical charities of the city. The Elswick works are large, but its workmen show a commendable and large-hearted liberality. Newc L8tle-on-Ty-ne, Oct. 10th. IRELAND. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) Proposed Memorials to Surgeon-Major Parke. A MEETING, presided over by the President of the Royal College of Surgeons was held at the Shelbourne Hotel, Dublin, on the 9th inst., for the purpose of appointing committees (general and working) and opening a fund to erect a memorial in honour of Surgeon-Major Parke. Sir George H. Porter, Bart, moved the following resolution : ’’ That, in view of the conspicuous services of the late Surgeon-Major Thomas H. Parke, A. M S., it is desirable that a permanent memorial be raised to perpetuate his name and his life-work, and that a committee be appointed to give effect to this resolution, with power to add to their number." Dr. William Moore seconded the motion, which was adopted. A short dis- cussion took place as to what form the memorial should take. Surgeon-General Colles thought that a statue in Dublin would be the best form, but he was anxious that the members of the deceased’s family and the committee of subscribers should be given an opportunity of having their suggestions attended to. Mr. Henry M. Stanley has sent a subscription of £50 towards the fund. A memorial window in memory of Surgeon-Major Parke will shortly be placed in Ballybay church, as he acted for some time as dispensary medical omcer in the Ballybay district. The subscrip- tion, limited to half-a-crown, is confined to members of the medical profession, and additional subscriptions to those already received can be forwarded to the Rev. A. B. Young, The Rectory, Ballybay. Proposed Amalgamation of two Dublin Ophthalmia Hospitals. It is stated that the long-talked-about amalgamation of the National Eye Infirmary and the St. Mark’s Ophthalmic Hospital has at last reached a satisfactory stage. A draft agreement has been prepared and settled by counsel representing both institutions, and it now only remains to have some matters of detail agreed upon before the hospitals make a joint appeal to the public for the necessary funds. Several years must elapse before the new hospital is properly established and the two ophthalmic institutions are placed under one roof.

NORTHERN COUNTIES NOTES

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small quantities at itn increased cost much hardship wasinflicted upon them at a time when they were suffering,great distress in consequence of the coal strike. A motionwas submitted that coke should be supplied in small quan-tities from the Corporation gasworks at a reduced price, theunderstanding being that the reduction should last only solong as the existing distress continued. The resolution, how-ever, was not adopted, because of alleged difIiculty in dis-tinguishing between the really deserving poor and others who’might take unfair advantage of the action of the Corporation.One thing, however, is certain-that unless either the coalstrike comes to an end very shortly or the weather remains’mild and temperate until an unusually late period of the

year, the present coal famine will cause terrible distressin Manchester, and it is difficult to see how this can be’averted by the proposed action of the Corporation. Soup(kitchens and other movements for the relief of distress

amongst the families of the colliers on strike have been in

,operation for some weeks past, and large numbers of men.and women out of work have been perambulating the streetsin the suburbs asking for subscriptions and representing thatgreat distress prevails amongst the whole fraternity of- colliers.

Oct. loth.

LIVERPOOL.(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

Reception at the Town Hall to Hospital Physicians and

Surgeons and Nurses.THE Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress entertained at the

- town-ban, on two evenings during the last week of September,the physicians and surgeons at nearly all the hospitals, themirses being also invited. It was a sight as pleasing as itwas novel, and it is to be hoped that it will not be the last- entertainment of the kind. The suite of rooms at the Liver-pool town-hall is said to be the finest in the kingdom, andit is surprising how many persons, who have lived and labouredin this city for many years, have never had an opportunity ofseeing them. On each of the two evenings 300 nurses were.present, the uniform dresses forming a pleasing variety, anda very agreeable evening was spent in each instance. Thelives of those who work in hospitals are somewhat monotonous,and to those who were present it was an occasion to beremembered.

Opening of the Winter Session at the Medical Institution.The first meeting at the Medical Institution for the present

session took place on Thursday, the 5th inst., when 150members and associates were present. The President,Dr. Glynn, delivered an address on Excessive MentalExcitement and some of its Causes. It was a very ableaddress and was very well received.

Oct. llth. ______________

NORTHERN COUNTIES NOTES.(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

Tyne Port Sanitary Authority and Cholera Precautions.AT the last meeting of the Tyne sanitary authority it was

stated that the Norwegian Consul had made application for.E5, being the cost of a seaman’s clothes which had been- destroyed after his death from cholera. This was allowedafter some discussion, on the understanding that it was notto be made a precedent ; but if the authority could destroy’every cholera-infected suit of clothes in their river at a costof .E5 each it could not be considered extravagant by anyreasonable person. There is a time for economy, but the

’expenditure of a few pounds to prevent a plague from obtain-ing a footing in the country might be prudent. Probably the95 which was paid represented this sailor’s whole effects, forseamen have rarely more clothes than they stand up in. The

report of the medical officer of health showed that for two’months there had been only one case of Asiatic cholera-namely, that on board the Jeannie, which was reported sometime ago. There had been several cases of diarrhoea, but nonewere of a very serious character. It was stated that thelate cholera precautions had cost the authority B135. Atthe last meeting of the sanitary committee typhoid fever

was reported to be prevalent at Middlesbrough. The death-rate was high-viz,, nearly 39 per 1000, against 24 per 1000at the corresponding period of last year. The epidemic ofdiarrhcr,a had continued, causing 41 deaths, mostly amongstchildren, but there had been two deaths from this canse inadults.

Bequests &c.Miss Dorothy Burnup, late of Newcastle-on-Tyne, left

about C4000 to local and other charities, including theNewcastle Royal Infirmary. The late Mr. Lupton W.Dawson of Wood Cottage, Baildon, left nearly £24,000 tocharitable institutions-the Sir Titus Salt’s Hospital, Saltaire,Ilkley Hospital and Bath Hospital, Harrogate, each receiving£4000, whilst the Bradford Eye and Ear Infirmary and theBradford Institution for the Blind benefit to the extent of.E2000 each. The friends and supporters of the NorthernCounties Institution for the Blind at Newcastle will bepleased to learn that the Duke of Northumberland hasforwarded :f500 towards its building extension fund, andthat Earl Percy has contributed E50 towards the sameobject. The fifth quinquennial festival of the Royal AlbertAsylum for Idiots and Imbeciles of the Northern Countieswill be held at Lancaster this year and will take place on the13th inst.

The Prevalence of Typhoid Fever in Durham County.Typhoid fever is reported to be prevalent in the Washing.

ton, Usworth and Houghton districts of Durham. In somehouses as many as three patients, mostly young people, aresuffering from the malady.

Liberality oj Elswick Workmen.The workmen at Elswick during the past three months con-

tributed nearly E300 to the Royal Infirmary and othermedical charities of the city. The Elswick works are large,but its workmen show a commendable and large-heartedliberality.Newc L8tle-on-Ty-ne, Oct. 10th.

IRELAND.(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

Proposed Memorials to Surgeon-Major Parke.A MEETING, presided over by the President of the Royal

College of Surgeons was held at the Shelbourne Hotel, Dublin,on the 9th inst., for the purpose of appointing committees(general and working) and opening a fund to erect a memorialin honour of Surgeon-Major Parke. Sir George H. Porter,Bart, moved the following resolution : ’’ That, in view of theconspicuous services of the late Surgeon-Major Thomas H.Parke, A. M S., it is desirable that a permanent memorial beraised to perpetuate his name and his life-work, and that acommittee be appointed to give effect to this resolution,with power to add to their number." Dr. William Mooreseconded the motion, which was adopted. A short dis-cussion took place as to what form the memorial shouldtake. Surgeon-General Colles thought that a statue inDublin would be the best form, but he was anxious thatthe members of the deceased’s family and the committeeof subscribers should be given an opportunity of having theirsuggestions attended to. Mr. Henry M. Stanley has sent asubscription of £50 towards the fund. A memorial window inmemory of Surgeon-Major Parke will shortly be placed inBallybay church, as he acted for some time as dispensarymedical omcer in the Ballybay district. The subscrip-tion, limited to half-a-crown, is confined to members of themedical profession, and additional subscriptions to thosealready received can be forwarded to the Rev. A. B. Young,The Rectory, Ballybay.

Proposed Amalgamation of two Dublin Ophthalmia Hospitals.It is stated that the long-talked-about amalgamation of

the National Eye Infirmary and the St. Mark’s OphthalmicHospital has at last reached a satisfactory stage. Adraft agreement has been prepared and settled by counselrepresenting both institutions, and it now only remains tohave some matters of detail agreed upon before the hospitalsmake a joint appeal to the public for the necessary funds.Several years must elapse before the new hospital is properlyestablished and the two ophthalmic institutions are placedunder one roof.