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    Newsletter Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the

    South Jersey Shore

    Volume 17, Issue 09 September 2015

    September Services

    We meet at our UU Center, Pomona Rd and Liebig Street, Galloway NJ (near the north entrance to Richard Stockton College). Services are at 10:00 am unless otherwise noted.

    September

    6

    Singing Our Sources Lay speaker Barbara Miller, UUCSJS Music Director Most Unitarian Universalists are aware of our Seven Principles. For many of us, the Principles

    are what first drew us to this faith. On the first Sunday in September we will explore the lesser

    known Six Sources of our living tradition through songs in Singing the Journey, affectionately

    known as the “teal hymnal.”

    September

    13

    Water Gathering Rev. Cynthia Cain The annual water "communion" is a ritual held each fall, in which UUCSJS members bring a

    small vial of water, collected during summer outings or travels, to pour into a shared container.

    Always a joyful, musical, and delightful time of re-connecting.

    September

    20

    The Search Rev. Cynthia Cain and the Ministerial Search Committee Rev. Cain and the "MSC" (Ministerial Search Committee) will present a service that helps you

    understand the nature of ministry, the different kinds of ministers, and the process of selecting

    one, so that as you travel through this year of change, you can be an informed and engaged

    participant.

    September

    27

    The Turning Rev. Cynthia Cain Rosh Hashanah will have just passed, but at this time of year, in the Jewish calendar, these are

    the High Holy Days. The time of turning, the act of forgiveness, and the renewal of vows are

    some of the most valuable, and most difficult practices we undertake in life. And yet, if we are

    to go forward, we are obligated to do them.

    SAVE THE DATE:

    UUCSJS 11th Annual Service Auction! Saturday, November 7, 2015

  • 2

    Anti-Racism Task Force Meeting

    Wednesday, September 23, 2015 6:30 pm at the UU Center

    Even if you haven’t attended a meeting yet, please feel to join us!

    Book Lovers Group

    UUCSJS BOOK LOVERS GROUP will have our first meeting on Friday, September 18 at 7 pm at the UU Center. The selection for September is THE BOYS IN THE BOAT: Nine Americans and Their Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, by Daniel James Brown. "... out of the depths of the Depression comes an irresistible story of beating the odds and finding hope..." Nancy Brail will be leading our discussion. All are welcome!!!

    Margaret Circle

    Our next MARGARET CIRCLE will be Thursday, September 3. Please plan to meet in the library of the UU center promptly at 1 pm. After we share Joys and Concerns, there will be a short business session, followed by the food delights of host Kathryn Kelley.

    Betsy Searight will present an article from Huffington Post and blog writer John Metta, titled “I, Racist.” Betsy asked that those planning to attend read the article ahead, as we prepare to engage in a healthy discussion on the topic and issues presented by Metta.

    You can obtain a paper copy of the article through Betsy on Sunday or by emailing Shelee McIlvaine. Come and join others in the Spirit of Loving-kindness

    What’s in the back of your closet?

    Do you have more shoes than you wear?

    A bin is in the UU Center foyer collecting new or gently used shoes for all ages in need by the less fortunate people in our area.

    Please bring them any Sunday and drop them off. Much appreciation for supporting our efforts.

    What’s new with

    Family Promise

    of Atlantic County?

    Soup-a-thon September 27

    You’ve seen our ads for the Soup Sale

    coming soon, and if that’s anywhere near as

    successful as our last one, it’ll bring in some

    cash for Family Promise of Atlantic County.

    Leading the Soup Sale once again is our

    expert fundraiser, Colby Tippins.

    As some of you know, Prim Reeves has

    chaired the UUCSJS Family Promise Team

    since its inception, but is now stepping down.

    Prim brought us through the difficult early

    stages, and we value all that she has done

    these past two years to make Family Promise

    of Atlantic County viable.

    Stepping into the role of team leader now is

    Debbi Dagavarian.

    Our fundraising efforts continue. Again this

    year, we will raise funds for Family Promise of

    Atlantic County through Boscov’s Friends

    Helping Friends 25% off Shopping Pass.

    Coupons cost only $5.00 each and the

    special shopping day at Boscov’s is Tuesday,

    October 20, 2015.

    Family Promise of Atlantic County will also

    hold a wine tasting again at the Noyes

    Museum this fall, and we have other exciting

    plans in the works, too.

    Anyone interested in joining us for UUCSJS

    Family Promise Team meetings, please do!

    We meet every 2nd Monday of the month

    from 6:30-8:00 pm at the UU Center.

    Support our congregation by doing what

    you already do – buy groceries! with gift cards for your local Acme or Shoprite!

    Using these gift cards for groceries nets the congregation 5%. We also have Fair Trade coffee, tea, and chocolate!

  • 3

    THREE LITTLE WORDS

    I perform a lot of weddings. Part of the task, in

    preparing the couples beforehand, is to get them to

    contemplate what it means to say, “I do,” and “I love

    you,” and “With this ring,” and, “I thee wed.”

    Such short phrases, and yet…. Worlds implied.

    Foundations upon which to build a relationship, create

    a family, and promises, commitments, that are going

    to take enormous reserves of courage, loyalty, strength,

    honesty, and perseverance.

    So it is with the three words that we have decided to

    post outside our UU Center: BLACK LIVES

    MATTER.

    These are not just words that denote a particular

    movement, or words that are being used to antagonize

    or instigate. While detractors would claim that they

    are, that their sole purpose is to divide, to undermine

    law enforcement, and to racialize things that are not

    based in racism, every shred of evidence from

    community studies over the last 50 years, to the recent

    Department of Justice findings, will underscore the

    truth that these three words need to be lifted up. Why

    do they make people so furious?

    As I write, the National Democratic Party has

    decided to sign on to the Black Lives Matter

    platform: http://www.msnbc.com/msnbc/dnc-passes-

    resolution-supporting-black-lives-

    matter?cid=sm_tw_msnbc

    A town in Massachusetts has posted a “Black Lives

    Matter” banner on their City Hall and the mayor

    explains why:

    http://commonwealthmagazine.org/opinion/black-

    lives-matter-more-than-a-slogan/

    Indeed, this town did something we did NOT do. They

    put up a banner that says “#BlackLivesMatter,” which

    identifies them even more narrowly with the

    movement itself. While we do support the movement,

    we chose to simply put the words on our sign. Black

    Lives Matter. For me, to read those words every day,

    over and over, like a mantra (because they are also on

    my wristband), is a spiritual exercise. If I believe

    Black Lives Matter, then what will I do differently

    today? Will I spend my time, my money, my talent,

    my energy, differently? In many cases, the answer has

    been yes. Yes, I will. It’s a kind of self-education and

    examination, an awakening to a new world and a new

    way of seeing to something to which I have been blind.

    The mayor of Somerville, MA wrote this: “This is a

    movement of awakening and clarity. It is asking us to

    be leaders within our families and our communities. It

    is asking us to remember our history and clearly see

    our present, and most urgently to shape a fair and

    equal future. This banner is an acknowledgement of

    our reality. It is our commitment to real change.” I

    encourage you to read his editorial.

    This is the kind of clarity UUs and progressive people

    of faith must project, among ourselves and out into the

    community.

    I heard a beautiful thing today. At a meeting in Egg

    Harbor Township hosted by the NAACP, the Atlantic

    County Prosecutor Jim McClain spoke to the question

    of Black Lives Matter. He said he has pondered this

    deeply, and read about it from both sides. 100 gold

    stars right there! And he realized that maybe the

    statement needs more words for some people. Maybe

    they need it to say: “Black Lives Matter… because

    they haven’t mattered as much as they should up to

    now.”

    An audible sigh went through the room. And then,

    applause. All except the 3 white women, obviously

    spouses of the officers on the panel. The mostly-Black

    audience felt acknowledged by a very-privileged,

    powerful, and knowledgeable man in the community.

    And yet, people attack us for putting this on a sign.