NEW SENIOR SECONDARY (NSS) UNDERSTANDING AND INTERPRETING THE CURRICULUM SERIES: ENGLISH LANGUAGE FOR ENGLISH TEACHERS THE SENIOR SECONDARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE.

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    17-Dec-2015

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  • Slide 1
  • NEW SENIOR SECONDARY (NSS) UNDERSTANDING AND INTERPRETING THE CURRICULUM SERIES: ENGLISH LANGUAGE FOR ENGLISH TEACHERS THE SENIOR SECONDARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK AND STRATEGIES FOR PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION (REFRESHED) ENGLISH LANGUAGE EDUCATION SECTION CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE EDUCATION BUREAU
  • Slide 2
  • How is the English language curriculum planned in your school? What do you expect your students to achieve in terms of English language learning after completing S6?
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  • BY THE END OF THE WORKSHOP, YOU WILL HAVE a better understanding of the design and the features of the three-year senior secondary English Language curriculum; explored strategies for curriculum planning and implementation; and designed task-based activities for senior secondary students.
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  • Planning the New Senior Secondary English Language Curriculum at Classroom Level
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  • DIAGRAMMATIC REPRESENTATION OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK 9 Generic Skills Values and Attitudes Flexible and Diversified Modes of Curriculum Planning + Effective Learning, Teaching and Assessment Overall Aims and Learning Targets of English Language KnowledgeInterpersonalExperience Learning Objectives:Forms and Functions Skills and Strategies Attitudes The English Language Curriculum Strands
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  • FEATURES OF A TASK Involves learners in thinking and doing Requires learners to draw upon a framework of knowledge and skills Product Purpose Context
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  • Provides contexts for: integrated use of language skills meaningful and purposeful use of English for communication Facilitates effective grammar and vocabulary learning and teaching Uses learning and teaching resources of a variety of text-types Promotes a learner-centred approach
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  • Adapted from Enhancing English Vocabulary Learning and Teaching at Secondary Level (2012), pp.81-137 Adopting a Task-based Approach in Lesson Design Module Cultures of the World Task 1 Reading an email from the teacher- in-charge of the HKs Heritage Excursion Task 2 Listening to an interview with the Executive Secretary of the Antiquities and Monuments Office Task 3 Studying some leaflets about the heritage sites in HK Task 4 Making recommendations for the Heritage Tour Final Task Writing a proposal and designing a poster for the Heritage Tour Unit Heritage Conservation
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  • 2013 HKDSE READING PAPER (PART A, COMPULSORY) A feature article about restoring the original colours of the Terra-cotta warriors through the use of science and technology 9
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  • QUESTIONS REQUIRING GENERAL READING SKILLS QuestionsCandidates are required to 5. According to paragraph 3, what were the farmers doing when they first discovered the terra-cotta warriors? 11. According to paragraph 5, why did the colours of the warriors not survive? 24. Match the 6 given sub-headings to the paragraphs in the article. 25. The text is (option C) a feature article.
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  • QUESTIONS REQUIRING MORE ADVANCED INTERPRETATION OF THE TEXT Questions Candidates are required to 1. What is the tone in paragraph 1? Excited (Option B) 2. What is special about the earthen pit (line 6)? 3.What is ancient jigsaw puzzle? 9. What does Qin Shi Huang Di packed a lot into his earthly reign (line 38-39) tell us about the first emperor? 12. In line 61, the writer mentions boiling an egg to show how vibrant pieces of history are lost in a short period of time.
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  • -Understand students previous learning and future learning needs -Building on the strengths of students and considering their future learning needs, plan for a Junior Secondary English Language curriculum to gear students towards the learning targets and objectives in the English Language curriculum EFFECTIVE STRATEGIES TO ENHANCE THE INTERFACE
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  • Junior Secondary Exposure to a wide range of print and non-print texts Extensive reading and viewing Further development of language skills and strategies Senior Secondary Exposure to a widened range of more complex text types School-based Assessment: critical and imaginative responses to texts Comprehension and production of more complex messages in more formal texts Primary Exposure to a range of text types Incorporation of Reading Workshops into the School-based English Language Curriculum Development of basic language skills and strategies Learning Experience across key stages
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  • Junior Secondary Exposure to a wide range of print and non-print texts Extensive reading and viewing Further development of language skills and strategies Senior Secondary Exposure to a widened range of more complex text types School-based Assessment: critical and imaginative responses to texts Comprehension and production of more complex messages in more formal texts Primary Exposure to a range of text types Incorporation of Reading Workshops into the School-based English Language Curriculum Development of basic language skills and strategies Learning Experience across key stages
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  • T Examples of Text Types for Key Stage 2 Examples of Text Types for Key Stage 3 Examples of Text Types for Key Stage 4 Plays Announcements Informational reports Maps and legends News / Weather reports Pamphlets E-mails Formal letters Discussions Telephone conversations Procedures Recipes Book reviews/reports Film reviews Itineraries Manuals Newspaper articles Short novels Short stories Interviews Presentations Editorials Debates Documentaries Essays Feature articles Films Novels Minutes Public speeches Proposals Resumes 15 Text types Across Different Key stages
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  • Junior Secondary Exposure to a wide range of print and non-print texts Extensive reading and viewing Further development of language skills and strategies Senior Secondary Exposure to a widened range of more complex text types School-based Assessment: critical and imaginative responses to texts Comprehension and production of more complex messages in more formal texts Primary Exposure to a range of text types Incorporation of Reading Workshops into the School-based English Language Curriculum Development of basic language skills and strategies Learning Experience across key stages
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  • GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS IN PLANNING FOR READING PROGRAMMES AT THE SECONDARY LEVEL Related topics Variety of text types Level of difficulty Integrating reading into regular English Language lessons with the other language skills of listening, speaking and writing 17
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  • READING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM To promote reading as a means to help learners seek information, develop thinking skills, enrich knowledge, enhance language proficiency and broaden perspectives To promote the development of functional reading skills to help learners relate English Language learning to daily life in real world To encourage extensive reading of a wide variety of resource materials with different subject content to enhance learning English Language Curriculum and Assessment Guide (Secondary 4 - 6) 2007 18
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  • TOPIC: EARTH Writing an article on the use of alternative energy sources for generating electricity Grammar items and structures, skills development Reading Skills & Strategies Info. about the Earth and environment protection Cause-and-effect relationship Adjectives to describe the Earth Text structure of explanation text Extended Reading: The Earth (An information book) Discover and Experience (A government pamphlet Electrical & Mechanical Services Department) READING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM Textbook: The Beautiful Planet
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  • Junior Secondary Exposure to a wide range of print and non-print texts Extensive reading and viewing Further development of language skills and strategies Senior Secondary Exposure to a widened range of more complex text types School-based Assessment: critical and imaginative responses to texts Comprehension and production of more complex messages in more formal texts Primary Exposure to a range of text types Incorporation of Reading Workshops into the School-based English Language Curriculum Development of basic language skills and strategies Learning Experiences across key stages
  • Slide 21
  • Depth of Processing Range and application of reading strategies Text complexity Abstractness Organisation Density of information Understanding -Locating information -Working out meaning of words and phrases -Connecting ideas -Identifying main ideas and supporting details -Distinguishing facts from opinions -Organising information and ideas Inferring -Inferring feelings -Deducing information and ideas -Comparing information and ideas -Working out main ideas and themes Interpreting -Analysing information and ideas -Synthesising -Evaluating -Justifying Cognitive processes involved in reading -Activating learners prior knowledge and experiences -Selection of a wide range of texts of appropriate lengths and different topics -Interplay between texts and tasks -The provision of teacher support and the need to promote learner independence Underlying principles
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  • COMPLEXITY OF TEXTS Easier textsMore difficult texts Abstractness Ideas and information explicitly stated Straightforward & factual information Ideas and information implicitly stated Meaning hidden between lines or beyond lines Organisation Well-defined text structure Organisation of paragraphs following sequence of events, logical progression (general to specific) Use of short paragraphs, subheadings & cohesive devices Lack of well-defined text structure, mix of text-types Organisation of paragraphs not following a common pattern (problem-solution) Lack of signposts to facilitate understanding of texts Density of information Most sentences/paragraphs containing one piece of information Sentence structures and language largely simple, with occasional use of complex structures High lexical density with a large amount of information- carrying words A wide range of complex sentence structures and language
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  • Example: 2013 HKDSE Exam Paper Part B1 Easy Section Example: 2012 HKDSE Exam Paper Part B2 Difficult Section Reading text 2 Para 7 and 8 Group courses for beginners comprise eight weekly classes of 45 minutes and cost HK$1,680. Each focuses on the basic skills of string plucking, correct body posture while playing and proper use of both hands. One-to-one classes are available for beginner, intermediate and advanced students and cost HK$420, HK$480 and HK$550 respectively. Skype lessons are available for people who would find travelling to the school difficult. Reading text 4 Para 10 Many young Chinese lament there is no Bill Gates of China. And the most cutting-edge scientific institutions are research centers run by Western-educated administrators wooing Chinese-born scientists back from the West, where they had relocated in order to enjoy the more rewarding research environment abroad. If they had the money and the clout and the personal connections to do so, Chinese moms would want to send their kids to Harvard (as several top-level Chinese leaders have done). In other words, the key to success is seen as a hybrid of East and West, at least when viewed from the lair of the Tiger Moms. ABSTRACTNESS
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  • ORGANISATION Example: Practice Paper Part B1 (Reading texts 3 & 4) Easy Section
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  • ORGANISATION Example: 2013 HKDSE Exam Paper Part B1 (Reading text 3) Easy Section [5] The study revealed that people with low self-esteem were more negative than people with high self-esteem and liked less by strangers who rated their participants status update. [6] The study also found that people with low self-esteem got more responses from their Facebook friends when they posted highly positive updates, compared to less positive ones. People with high self-esteem, on the other hand, used Facebook less and got more like replies after posting something negative, perhaps because these responses are rarer for them. [10] In theory, social networking websites like Facebook could be great for people with low self-esteem. Sharing is important for improving friendships. But in practice, people with low self-esteem seem to behave counterproductively, bombarding their friends with negative tidbits about their lives and making themselves likeable.
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  • ORGANISATION
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  • Example: 2013 HKDSE Exam Paper Part B1 Easy Section Example: 2012 HKDSE Exam Paper Part B2 Difficult Section Reading text 3 Paras 2 & 3 New research suggests that so-called power users, who contribute much more content than the average Facebook user, are unwittingly revealing undesirable personal traits to their peers. The recent study also suggests that Facebook is not good for those suffering from low self-esteem. We had this idea that Facebook could be a fantastic place for people to strengthen their relationships, says Amanda Forest of the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. Reading text 3 Para 1 The Wall Street Journals provocative January 8 headline alone Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior would have been enough to spark intense discussion. But coupled with an excerpt from Amy Chuas parenting memoir, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother (Penguin Press, Jan.), that sharply contrasts so-called Eastern and Western styles of parenting, what resulted was nothing less than a firestorm. DENSITY OF INFORMATION
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  • Implications for learning and teaching To review the texts in the examination papers/textbooks/skills books/practice papers in relation to students language abilities and learning needs To select different texts for different pedagogical purposes (e.g. teaching/practising/assessing reading skills) To plan reading programmes which include a range of texts to cater for learner diversity
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  • Depth of Processing Range and application of reading strategies Text complexity Abstractness Organisation Density of information Understanding -Locating information -Working out meaning of words and phrases -Connecting ideas -Identifying main ideas and supporting details -Distinguishing facts from opinions -Organising information and ideas Inferring -Inferring feelings -Deducing information and ideas -Comparing information and ideas -Working out main ideas and themes Interpreting -Analysing information and ideas -Synthesising -Evaluating -Justifying Cognitive processes involved in reading -Activating learners prior knowledge and experiences -Selection of a wide range of texts of appropriate lengths and different topics -Interplay between texts and tasks -The provision of teacher support and the need to promote learner independence Underlying principles
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  • PROGRESSION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF WRITING SKILLS Expectations on learners at different stages of writing skills development Content Language & Style Organisation Underlying principles Writing a small range of texts such as simple stories, letters to describe personal experiences, people, places, events and objects Conveying relevant ideas Writing a range of formal and informal texts to describe, recount, record, explain, propose and summarise Elaborate ideas from various perspectives Writing simple literary/imaginative texts with a setting and some development of plots and characters Writing a wide range of texts to reviews, compare and contrast Elaborating ideas with substantial and logical illustration Writing literary/imaginative texts with a clear setting, a well- developed plot and good characterisation Providing opportunities for brainstorming or seeking and selecting information and ideas from different sources Developing learners skills in self-editing as well as reflecting on own writing based on feedback from teachers or peers Reducing the amount of teacher support provided as learners progress to promote learner independence Range of vocabulary and sentence patterns Appropriate tone and register Stylistic features for the text-type An organisational framework Clear focus within and across paragraphs using cohesive devices
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  • ENHANCING INTERFACE: A FEW POINTS TO PONDER What are my students capable of achieving? Are the reading texts appropriate to students? What types of learning tasks should I assign to my students? Are my students making the expected progress? What do my students need in order to progress further?
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  • Implementing the New Senior Secondary English Language Curriculum
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  • THE SENIOR SECONDARY ENGLISH LANGUAGE CURRICULUM S6 S5 S4 Elective Part (25%) Compulsory Part (75%)
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  • THE COMPULSORY PART Meaningful use of: through the task-based approach and the organising structure of Modules, Units and Tasks by adopting a range of approaches and strategies Reading / Writing Listening / Speaking Vocabulary Text Types Grammar Forms & Communicative Functions
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  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT GUIDE (SECONDARY 4-6), P.54 While Modules, Units and Tasks are to be adopted for organising learning and teaching in the Compulsory Part, the modules in the Elective Part may not necessarily follow the M-U-T structure. However, the general approach to teaching the modules in the Elective Part remains task-based that is, teachers are encouraged to continue with the principles and practices associated with task-based learning, namely using learner-centred instruction, providing opportunities for meaningful and purposeful communication and promoting integrative and creative uses of language.
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  • Task-based Learning Grammar in Context Language Arts Integrated Skills Assessment for Learning Self-access Language Learning COMPULSORY PART
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  • THE ELECTIVE PART Adds variety to the English Language curriculum Caters for students diverse needs and interests Broadens students learning experiences
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  • Language ArtsNon-Language Arts 8 Elective Modules Learning English through Drama Learning English through Short Stories Learning English through Poems and Songs Learning English through Popular Culture Learning English through Social Issues Learning English through Debating Learning English through Sports Communication Learning English through Workplace Communication THE ELECTIVE PART
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  • Compulsory Part Reading/ Writing Listening/ Speaking Vocabulary Text Types Grammar Forms & Communicative Functions Speaking Skills pronunciation stress rhythm & intonation Relationship between the Compulsory and Elective Parts (an illustration with the drama module) Elective Part (Drama module) Dramatised Reading Role play / Drama performance Text Types dialogues stories Extension, application and consolidation of what has been learned stress & intonation expression of emotions and feelings short scene writing production of an original script
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  • Compulsory Part Reading/ Writing Listening/ Speaking Vocabulary Text Types Grammar Forms & Communicative Functions Speaking Skills Pronunciation stress rhythm & intonation Elective Part (Debating module) --Stress & intonation -- Writing/presenting --Expression of arguments emotions -- Production of a and feeling a debate speech Debating activities in a less formal contexts (e.g. role play, panel discussion) Formal debates Text Types Argumentative essays Speeches Extension, application and consolidation of what has been learned Relationship between the Compulsory and Elective Parts (an illustration with the debating module)
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  • PLANNING THE ELECTIVE PART IN CONTEXT (KEY CONSIDERATIONS) Choice of elective modules Approaches to implementing the elective module (as a standalone module or integrated with other curriculum and assessment components) Timetabling Adaptations of the S.O.W. (e.g. selecting appropriate learning focuses) Sources of learning and teaching materials (e.g. textbooks, school-based materials, resource packages, the media) Teacher deployment Interface with the JS curriculum
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  • Social issues Module Debating Module Definitions Causes, effects & solutions (2 periods) Definitions Causes, effects & solutions (2 periods) Basic understanding of knowledge and skills Further input & more in-depth exploration Multiple perspectives Researching a social issue Evaluating information Citing sources (3-4 periods) Multiple perspectives Researching a social issue Evaluating information Citing sources (3-4 periods) Application and demonstration of achievements Presenting the work in different formats (2 periods) Presenting the work in different formats (2 periods) Basic set up of debating The idea of argument (2 periods) Basic set up of debating The idea of argument (2 periods) Defining motions Analysing assumptions Forming arguments Preparing speeches Using delivery techniques (3-4 periods) Defining motions Analysing assumptions Forming arguments Preparing speeches Using delivery techniques (3-4 periods) Debating activity Self/peer assessment (2 periods) Debating activity Self/peer assessment (2 periods) Relationship between Social Issue Module and Debating Module
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  • INTEGRATING VARIOUS CURRICULUM COMPONENTS Compulsory Part and Elective Part Elective Part and SBA Elective Modules 43
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  • COMPULSORY PART AND ELECTIVE PART
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  • ELECTIVE PART AND SBA 1.Reading a webpage article 2.Surfing websites on sports 3.Writing a presentation plan 1.Reading some fan material (e.g. magazines, letters, profiles) 2.Watching a video clip 3.Surfing websites and reading magazines on a sports player 1.Viewing part of a film on sports outside class 2.Writing a journal entry on a film on sports 3.Surfing websites on message boards of the film Task 1 (7 lessons) Hot Sports (Introducing a sport in the morning assembly) Task 2 (5 lessons) Fan Talk (Writing a piece of fan material on a sports player) Task 3 (6 lessons) Open Forum (Discussing a film on sports)
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  • Target Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes Popular Culture the content, strategies, language and stylistic features of advertisements/commercials linguistics and stylistic features of a leaflet organising structure of a leaflet Social Issues understanding how various perspectives and lines of reasoning are presented within a reading text demonstrating critical awareness of the complex nature of the issue by examining it from different perspectives language functions that signal causes and effects in a discussion ELECTIVE MODULES
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  • EXPERIENCE SHARING In your group, share with others your experience in planning and/or implementing the senior secondary curriculum. You may want to talk about: if your school integrates different curriculum components; the challenges you encountered/you anticipate in planning and delivering the curriculum; and how you overcame the challenges/you think the challenges could be tackled. 47
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  • THANK YOU 48

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