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214 in the department of physiology, McGill University. Proposed research : the effect of thoracic sympathectomy on the activities of the lung. At the department of physiology, University of Edinburgh. BERNHARD KATZ, M.D. Leipzig, Ph.D. Lond. Since 1935 research worker in biophysics at University College, London. Proposed research : electric excitation and transmission of impulses in nerve and muscle of animals. At the department of biophysics, University College, University of London. JONAS HENRIK KELLGREN, M.B., M.R.C.P. Lond., F.R.C.S. Eng. Resident appointments, University College Hospital, London, 1935-36, and since 1937 research worker in its department of clinical research. Proposed research : painful conditions of the limbs and back. At the department of clinical research, University College Hospital, University of London. JOHN JAMES DUNCAN KING, L.D.S. Eng., Ph.D. Sheff. House surgeon, Dundee Dental Hospital, 1931-32. Since 1936 research grantee of Medical Research Council. Proposed research : dental caries and parodontal disease. At the medical school, University of Sheffield. HERMANN LEHMANN, M.D. Bale, Ph.D. Camb. Research- worker, Physiological Institute, Heidelberg, 1934-36. Since 1936 research student of Christ’s College, Cambridge. Proposed research : blood-sugar in animals, and iron metabolism in plants. At the institute of biochemistry, University of Cambridge. WALTER JOHN O’CONNOR, M.B. Adelaide. David Murray scholar, 1934. Resident medical officer, Adelaide Hospital, 1936. Lecturer in human physiology and pharmacology, University of Adelaide, 1936-37. Proposed research: effect of strophanthin on the oxygen consumption of the heart. At the laboratory of pharmacology, University of Cambridge. HAROLD SCARBOROUGH, M.B. Edin. Crichton research scholar, 1933. House physician, Royal Infirmary, Edin- burgh. Since 1934 assistant in department of therapeutics, University of Edinburgh. Proposed research : mode of destruction of vitamin C in the human body. At the clinical and chemical laboratories, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh. All correspondence of fellows and candidates should be addressed to Prof. T. R. Elliott, F.R.S., hon. sec., Beit memorial fellowships, University College Hospital medical school, University-street, London, W.C.I. NATIONAL HOSPITAL FOR DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM ON July 19th Queen Mary opened a ten-storied building attached to this hospital. In briefly relating its history the Earl of Athlone, the president, said that in 1935 the Rockefeller Foundation had given z60,000 for building and E60,000 for research. Other sums had brought the total to 158,000. The extension increases the beds by 43 and provides three new’ floors for research. The basement, ground and first floors are allocated to teaching and research, and on the ground floor there are also two private consulting-rooms where the physicians or surgeons on the honorary staff may see private patients without leaving the hospital. The teaching accommodation includes a large lecture theatre, a small practical class-room, and a refectory for students as well as a library, to the equipment and comfort of which old students of the hospital from Canada and the United States have contributed. In the numerous laboratories an attempt has been made to provide for future as well as present needs. To this end most of the benches have been so constructed that their height can be varied at will, and they can be taken to pieces and stored, or replaced by others of different sizes. The accessory services of gas, water, elec- tricity, and compressed air are contained in boxes running round the walls or in a concealed panel in the centre of the floor. Screw sockets are set in the walls and ceilings to enable shelves to be easily put up and taken down, or apparatus to be suspended. Above the laboratories are three floors of wards, each containing 16 beds. Two of these are for surgical cases and one is for cases admitted for special investigations. The wards are arranged in four-bedded rooms with a glass screen between them to facilitate supervision, and at the same time to retain the comfort of a small room. The next floor is devoted to the operation theatres and X ray diagnostic equipment, and single rooms for private surgical and psychological patients fill the upper floors. All the wards and rooms face south-west over the garden of Queen-square and their windows can be folded back to make them practically open-air wards. Waiting-rooms for patients’friends are provided on allthe surgical floors. The two operating theatres are served by a central sterilising room, the outer wall of which contains a panel filled by the doors and taps of the sterilising plant. The bulky parts of these project through the wall into a penthouse which can be reached by an outside balcony. On the roof of the building is a small animal house. Throughout the building the corridors and doors have been made wide enough to allow beds to be moved easily from the wards to the dressing-rooms or the private rooms of the physicians and surgeons, a point of special importance in the care of paralysed patients. SCOTLAND (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT) SURGICAL RESEARCH AT EDINBURGH THE surgical research department of Edinburgh University has now been in existence for twelve years. On Wednesday the Minister of Health, Mr. Walter Elliot, starts a new phase in its history when he opens an extension. A new floor for laboratories and research rooms has been built and new apparatus for experimental research has been acquired. The operating theatres which were a feature of the original building have been refitted and now compare favourably with those of any modern hospital. It is an axiom of the department that all surgical intervention in animals must be carried out with the same care as is used in human surgery and the new theatres will do much to make this easier. A notable addition is a studio for medical art where the modern methods of the American school of illustration are to be employed. The importance of accurate records and graphic representation has been recognised and a trained staff using modern equipment should ensure that they are achieved. Work already done by the department includes research of a fundamental nature into the cause of death in burns and in various types of intestinal obstruction. The mechanism of massive collapse of the lung has been studied and new light thrown on the relation of kidney disease to raised blood pressure. Of special interest has been the study of micro- scopical sections of whole organs, combined with a detailed study of the spread of disease by lymphatic routes. This method has already proved its worth in studies of cancer of the stomach and colon and in tuberculosis of the kidney. In all the investigations a close association has been maintained between the experimental investigations carried out and clinical problems as met with in the wards. It is through this close association of experimental work with clinical practice that the department aims at improv- ing the standard of observation and surgical technique in the hospitals.

NATIONAL HOSPITAL FOR DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

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in the department of physiology, McGill University.Proposed research : the effect of thoracic sympathectomyon the activities of the lung. At the department of

physiology, University of Edinburgh.BERNHARD KATZ, M.D. Leipzig, Ph.D. Lond. Since

1935 research worker in biophysics at University College,London. Proposed research : electric excitation andtransmission of impulses in nerve and muscle of animals.At the department of biophysics, University College,University of London.JONAS HENRIK KELLGREN, M.B., M.R.C.P. Lond.,

F.R.C.S. Eng. Resident appointments, University CollegeHospital, London, 1935-36, and since 1937 researchworker in its department of clinical research. Proposedresearch : painful conditions of the limbs and back. Atthe department of clinical research, University CollegeHospital, University of London.JOHN JAMES DUNCAN KING, L.D.S. Eng., Ph.D. Sheff.

House surgeon, Dundee Dental Hospital, 1931-32. Since1936 research grantee of Medical Research Council.Proposed research : dental caries and parodontal disease.At the medical school, University of Sheffield.HERMANN LEHMANN, M.D. Bale, Ph.D. Camb. Research-

worker, Physiological Institute, Heidelberg, 1934-36.Since 1936 research student of Christ’s College, Cambridge.Proposed research : blood-sugar in animals, and ironmetabolism in plants. At the institute of biochemistry,University of Cambridge.WALTER JOHN O’CONNOR, M.B. Adelaide. David Murray

scholar, 1934. Resident medical officer, Adelaide Hospital,1936. Lecturer in human physiology and pharmacology,University of Adelaide, 1936-37. Proposed research:effect of strophanthin on the oxygen consumption of theheart. At the laboratory of pharmacology, Universityof Cambridge.

HAROLD SCARBOROUGH, M.B. Edin. Crichton researchscholar, 1933. House physician, Royal Infirmary, Edin-burgh. Since 1934 assistant in department of therapeutics,University of Edinburgh. Proposed research : mode ofdestruction of vitamin C in the human body. At the clinicaland chemical laboratories, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh.All correspondence of fellows and candidates shouldbe addressed to Prof. T. R. Elliott, F.R.S., hon. sec.,Beit memorial fellowships, University College Hospitalmedical school, University-street, London, W.C.I.

NATIONAL HOSPITAL FOR DISEASESOF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

ON July 19th Queen Mary opened a ten-storiedbuilding attached to this hospital. In briefly relatingits history the Earl of Athlone, the president, saidthat in 1935 the Rockefeller Foundation had givenz60,000 for building and E60,000 for research. Othersums had brought the total to 158,000.The extension increases the beds by 43 and provides

three new’ floors for research. The basement,ground and first floors are allocated to teaching andresearch, and on the ground floor there are also twoprivate consulting-rooms where the physicians or

surgeons on the honorary staff may see privatepatients without leaving the hospital. The teachingaccommodation includes a large lecture theatre, a

small practical class-room, and a refectory for studentsas well as a library, to the equipment and comfort ofwhich old students of the hospital from Canada andthe United States have contributed. In the numerouslaboratories an attempt has been made to providefor future as well as present needs. To this end mostof the benches have been so constructed that their

height can be varied at will, and they can be taken topieces and stored, or replaced by others of differentsizes. The accessory services of gas, water, elec-

tricity, and compressed air are contained in boxes

running round the walls or in a concealed panel inthe centre of the floor. Screw sockets are set in the

walls and ceilings to enable shelves to be easily putup and taken down, or apparatus to be suspended.Above the laboratories are three floors of wards,

each containing 16 beds. Two of these are for

surgical cases and one is for cases admitted for

special investigations. The wards are arranged infour-bedded rooms with a glass screen between them tofacilitate supervision, and at the same time to retainthe comfort of a small room. The next floor isdevoted to the operation theatres and X ray diagnosticequipment, and single rooms for private surgical andpsychological patients fill the upper floors. All thewards and rooms face south-west over the garden ofQueen-square and their windows can be folded back tomake them practically open-air wards. Waiting-roomsfor patients’friends are provided on allthe surgical floors.The two operating theatres are served by a central

sterilising room, the outer wall of which contains apanel filled by the doors and taps of the sterilisingplant. The bulky parts of these project through thewall into a penthouse which can be reached by anoutside balcony. On the roof of the building is asmall animal house.

Throughout the building the corridors and doorshave been made wide enough to allow beds to bemoved easily from the wards to the dressing-rooms or theprivate rooms of the physicians and surgeons, a pointof special importance in the care of paralysed patients.

SCOTLAND

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT)

SURGICAL RESEARCH AT EDINBURGH

THE surgical research department of EdinburghUniversity has now been in existence for twelve

years. On Wednesday the Minister of Health,Mr. Walter Elliot, starts a new phase in its historywhen he opens an extension. A new floor forlaboratories and research rooms has been built andnew apparatus for experimental research has beenacquired. The operating theatres which were a

feature of the original building have been refittedand now compare favourably with those of any modernhospital. It is an axiom of the department that allsurgical intervention in animals must be carriedout with the same care as is used in human surgeryand the new theatres will do much to make thiseasier. A notable addition is a studio for medicalart where the modern methods of the American schoolof illustration are to be employed. The importanceof accurate records and graphic representation hasbeen recognised and a trained staff using modernequipment should ensure that they are achieved.Work already done by the department includes

research of a fundamental nature into the cause ofdeath in burns and in various types of intestinalobstruction. The mechanism of massive collapse ofthe lung has been studied and new light thrown onthe relation of kidney disease to raised blood pressure.Of special interest has been the study of micro-scopical sections of whole organs, combined with adetailed study of the spread of disease by lymphaticroutes. This method has already proved its worthin studies of cancer of the stomach and colon and intuberculosis of the kidney. In all the investigationsa close association has been maintained between the

experimental investigations carried out and clinicalproblems as met with in the wards. It is throughthis close association of experimental work withclinical practice that the department aims at improv-ing the standard of observation and surgical techniquein the hospitals.