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Monteverdi · PDF file Claudio Monteverdi (1567–1643) 1 L’Orfeo 1:36 ENGLISH BAROQUE SOLOISTS · JOHN ELIOT GARDINER Vespro della Beata Vergine 2 Lauda Jerusalem a 7 3:48 3 Duo

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  • MonteverdiThe Beauty of

  • The Beauty ofMonteverdi

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  • 12 Zefiro torna, e di soavi accenti (Scherzi musicali, cioè arie, et madrigali in stil recitativo) 6:47 Text: Ottavio Rinuccini ANNA PROHASKA soprano · MAGDALENA KOŽENÁ mezzo-soprano LA CETRA BAROCKORCHESTER BASEL · ANDREA MARCON harpsichord and conductor

    13 Lamento della ninfa (Ottavo libro de’ madrigali: Madrigali guerrieri, et amorosi) 8:00 Text: Ottavio Rinuccini MAGDALENA KOŽENÁ mezzo-soprano JAKOB PILGRAM · MICHAEL FEYFAR tenor · LUCA TITTOTO bass LA CETRA BAROCKORCHESTER BASEL · ANDREA MARCON harpsichord and conductor

    14 Io mi son giovinetta (Quarto libro de’ madrigali) 2:14 Text: Giovanni Battista Guarini EMMA KIRKBY · EVELYN TUBB soprano · MARY NICHOLS alto JOSEPH CORNWELL tenor · RICHARD WISTREICH bass CONSORT OF MUSICKE · ANTHONY ROOLEY

    15 Parlo, miser, o taccio (Settimo libro de’ madrigali) 4:42 Text: Giovanni Battista Guarini EMMA KIRKBY · JUDITH NELSON soprano · DAVID THOMAS bass CONSORT OF MUSICKE · ANTHONY ROOLEY

    16 Laetatus sum (Messa, salmi concertati e parte da capella, et letanie della B. V.) 6:09 SUSAN HEMINGTON JONES · TESSA BONNER soprano CHARLES DANIELS · ANDREW TUSA tenor PETER HARVEY baritone · JONATHAN BEST bass GABRIELI CONSORT & PLAYERS · PAUL MCCREESH

    17 L’incoronazione di Poppea: “Pur ti miro” (Poppea, Nerone) 5:10 Libretto: Giovanni Francesco Busenello ANNA PROHASKA soprano (Poppea) · MAGDALENA KOŽENÁ mezzo-soprano (Nerone) LA CETRA BAROCKORCHESTER BASEL · ANDREA MARCON harpsichord and conductor

    Claudio Monteverdi (1567–1643) 1 L’Orfeo: Toccata 1:36

    ENGLISH BAROQUE SOLOISTS · JOHN ELIOT GARDINER

    Vespro della Beata Vergine 2 Lauda Jerusalem a 7 3:48 3 Duo seraphim a 3 6:44 4 Nisi Dominus a 10 4:36 5 Pulchra es a 2 3:57

    MARINELLA PENNICCHI � · ANN MONOYIOS � soprano MARK TUCKER � · NIGEL ROBSON � · SANDRO NAGLIA � tenor · THE MONTEVERDI CHOIR � , � JAKOB LINDBERG � chitarrone, � lute · DAVID MILLER �, � · CHRISTOPHER WILSON � chitarrone ENGLISH BAROQUE SOLOISTS · HIS MAJESTYS SAGBUTTS & CORNETTS · JOHN ELIOT GARDINER Recorded live at the Basilica di San Marco, Venice

    L’Orfeo Libretto: Alessandro Striggio jr

    6 “Rosa del ciel” (Orfeo) … “Io non dirò qual sia” (Euridice) … 4:30 Balletto: “Lasciate i monti” … “Vieni, Imeneo” (Coro) 7 Sinfonia … “Ecco pur ch’a voi ritorno” (Orfeo) 0:50 8 “Mira ch’a sé n’alletta” (Pastore I & II) … “Dunque fa’ degni, Orfeo” (Coro) 2:18 9 “Qual onor di te fia degno” … “O dolcissimi lumi” (Orfeo) – 3:16 “Rott’hai la legge” (Spirito III) 10 “Ahi, vista troppo dolce” (Euridice) … “Torna a l’ombre di morte” (Spirito I) – 2:34 “Dove ten vai, mia vita?” (Orfeo) 11 Moresca 1:13

    ANTHONY ROLFE JOHNSON tenor (Orfeo) · JULIANNE BAIRD soprano (Euridice) · MARK TUCKER tenor (Pastore I) NIGEL ROBSON tenor (Pastore II) · HOWARD MILNER tenor (Spirito I) · JOHN TOMLINSON baritone (Spirito III) THE MONTEVERDI CHOIR · ENGLISH BAROQUE SOLOISTS · JOHN ELIOT GARDINER

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  • Paul McCreeshMagdalena KoženáAnne Sofie von Otter John Eliot Gardiner

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  • L’incoronazione di Poppea 23 “Adagiati, Poppea … Oblivion soave” (Arnalta) 2:52 24 “Sento un certo non so che” (Valletto, Damigella) 2:07 25 “Scendiam, scendiam” (Amore, Coro d’Amori, Venere, Poppea, Nerone) 7:56

    BERNARDA FINK alto (Arnalta, Coro d’Amori) · CONSTANZE BACKES soprano (Valletto, Coro d’Amori) MARINELLA PENNICCHI soprano (Damigella, Amore, Coro d’Amori) · CATHERINE BOTT soprano (Coro d’Amori) SYLVIA MCNAIR soprano (Poppea) · DANA HANCHARD soprano (Nerone) ANNE SOFIE VON OTTER mezzo-soprano (Venere) ENGLISH BAROQUE SOLOISTS · JOHN ELIOT GARDINER Recorded live at the Queen Elizabeth Hall, Southbank Centre, London

    26 Cruda Amarilli (Quinto libro de’ madrigali) 2:36 Text: Giovanni Battista Guarini EMMA KIRKBY soprano · MARY NICHOLS alto JOSEPH CORNWELL · ANDREW KING tenor · RICHARD WISTREICH · JOHN MILNE bass CONSORT OF MUSICKE · ANTHONY ROOLEY

    27 Deus qui mundum crimine iacentem (Selva morale e spirituale) 4:24 CHARLES POTT baritone GABRIELI CONSORT & PLAYERS · PAUL MCCREESH

    28 Sì dolce è ’l tormento (Quarto scherzo delle ariose vaghezze) 3:23 Text: Carlo Milanuzzi MAGDALENA KOŽENÁ mezzo-soprano PRIVATE MUSICKE · PIERRE PITZL

    Vespro della Beata Vergine 29 Nigra sum a 1 3:18 30 Magnificat I a 7 18:00

    JOSEPH CORNWELL tenor �� GABRIELI CONSORT & PLAYERS · PAUL MCCREESH

    18 Laudate pueri Dominum II (Selva morale e spirituale) 7:09 SUSAN HEMINGTON JONES · TESSA BONNER soprano CHARLES DANIELS · ANGUS SMITH tenor · JONATHAN BEST bass GABRIELI CONSORT & PLAYERS · PAUL MCCREESH

    19 Laudate Dominum in sanctis eius (Selva morale e spirituale) 3:33 ANGUS SMITH tenor PAULA CHATEAUNEUF chitarrone · TIMOTHY ROBERTS organ GABRIELI CONSORT & PLAYERS · PAUL MCCREESH

    20 Lamento d’Arianna 11:02 Adapted for solo voice and theorbo by Jakob Lindberg Text: Ottavio Rinuccini ANNE SOFIE VON OTTER mezzo-soprano JAKOB LINDBERG theorbo

    21 Non voglio amare (Nono libro de’ madrigali) 1:11 Text: anon. NIGEL ROGERS · IAN PARTRIDGE tenor · CHRISTOPHER KEYTE bass WERNER KAUFMANN virginal · COLIN TILNEY harpsichord EUGEN M. DOMBOIS lute · MICHAEL SCHÄFFER chitarrone HEINRICH HAFERLAND viola da gamba · HANS KOCH violone JÜRGEN JÜRGENS direction

    22 Come dolce oggi l’auretta (Nono libro de’ madrigali) 3:25 Text: Giulio Strozzi EMMA KIRKBY · JUDITH NELSON · POPPY HOLDEN soprano CONSORT OF MUSICKE · ANTHONY ROOLEY

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  • a high forehead. The sitter gives the impression of being tall, he has sensi- tive, long hands and gazes out into the world with obvious vigilance. Even in the portraits that show him as a young man he has this same highly inquisi- tive look. Claudio Monteverdi was born in Cre- mona in 1567. Cremona was a small trad- ing centre, where Stradivarius and Amati built their violins and where Montever- di’s forebears are said to have included lute-makers. His father was a surgeon and encouraged his sons in their resolve to go into music. Claudio was only fif- teen when he published his three-part Sacrae cantiunculae, twenty-three original motets to words taken from the lives of the saints, followed soon afterwards by two books of three- and five-part madri- gals. In short he made a precocious start in life, and by the age of twenty-three he had been appointed to a position at the court of Duke Vincenzo I Gonzaga in Mantua, where his duties included

    playing the viol. It was at around this time that the deaths of Palestrina and Orlande de Lassus spelt the end of the heyday of Franco-Flemish polyphony and the first opera was performed: Dafne by Jacopo Peri. Staged in Florence during the 1597/98 carnival, Dafne has not survived, but the same is not true of Monteverdi’s Favola d’Orfeo, which tells the story of the bard Orpheus and which was first performed at the Palaz- zo Ducale in Mantua on 24 February 1607. Behind the performance lay the Acca- demia degli Invaghiti: the Academy of the Lovestruck. And what a subject for a first opera! Following the death of his beloved Eurydice, the gifted singer Orpheus, who can move even the stones and wild beasts to tears with his sing- ing, persuades the gods of the Under- world to allow his dead wife to return with him to the earth. He is permitted to return with her in person, but only on condition that he does not turn round and look at her on their way back to the

    Il divino Claudio

    I l divino Claudio was the name that the Italians gave to their Monte- verdi. And there is another honor-

    ific title that has attached itself to his name: the “father of opera”. He created so much that was new in music – and not just in the field of opera, which is in any case inextricably linked to his name. His achievements as maestro di cappella at St Mark’s in Venice and the way in which he transformed the music of his time, breathing new life into it and contributing to its development during the transitional period from the Renaissance to the Baroque – these are all aspects of his work that continue to astonish us today. Even before he moved

    to Venice, he had already published five books of madrigals, bringing up to date and modernizing a form that until then had been associated with the world of early music. Polyphonic choral singing was replaced by Baroque monody, by the solo voice and by the sung poem. With this we are already close to the oper- atic aria. Here, too, Monteverdi found himself in exactly the right place at the right time, for in 1637 the world’s first public opera house was opened in Ven- ice: the Teatro San Cassiano. It was around this time that Bernar- do Strozzi painted his famous portrait of Monteverdi. It shows a gaunt figure with a serious face, intelligent eyes and

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  • for us because it can never become ‘early music,’ but will always remain vital and living.” And yet this great composer, the 450th anniversary of whose birth falls in 2017, fell into obscurity for several centuries. His opera L’incoronazione di Poppea was last performed in 1681–82 and not revived until 1905. Now, in the 21st century, his operas have long been a regular part of the repertory, while even his madrigals are performed and heard. In an interview with Harper’s Magazine in 1967, Stravinsky said of Monteverdi: “Obviously I feel very

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