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Horton-Deutsch and Mohr The Fading of Nursing Leadership 3. Dilts R. The new leadership paradigm: one of the most important sets of skills: the article of the month, NLP. Santa Cruz (CA): Dilts; 1996. 4. Hartz A, Krakauer H, Kuhn E. Hospital characteristics and mortality rates. N Engl J Med 1989;321:1720-5. 5. Mohr WK, Mahon MM. Dirty hands: the underside of market- place health care. Adv Nurs Sci 1996;19:28-37. 6. MacKinnon C. Feminism, Marxism, and the state. Signs 1982;7: 1- 8. 7. Flax R. Postmodernism and gender relations in feminist theory. In: Nicholson LJ, editor. Feminism/post-modernism. New York: Routledge; 1990. p. 39-62. 8. Reverby SM. Ordered to care: the dilemma of American nursing 1850-1945. Cambridge: University Press; 1987. 9. Ashley JA. Hospitals, paternalism, and the role of the nurse. New York: Columbia University Press; 1976. 10. Roberts SJ. Oppressed group behaviors: implications for nursing. Adv Nurs Sci 1983;5:21-30. 11. Freire P. Pedagogy of the oppressed. 2nd ed. New York: Continuum; 2000. 12. Chambliss DF. Beyond caring: hospitals, nurses, and the social organization of ethics. Chicago: University of Chicago Press; 1998. 13. Kramer M, Schmalenberg C. Magnet hospitals, 1: institutions of excellence. J Nurs Admin 1998;18:13-24. 14. Aiken LH, Havens DS, Sloane DM. The magnet nursing service recognition program. Am J Nurs 2000;100:26-35. 15. Fagin C. Executive leadership: improving nursing practice, educa- tion, and research. J Nurs Admin 1996;26:30-7. 16. Trice H, Beyer J. The culture of work organizations. Englewood Cliff (NJ): Prentice-Hall; 1993. 17. Kovner C, Gergen PJ. Nurse staffing levels and adverse events following surgery in US hospitals. Image J Nurs Schol 1998; 30:315-21. 18. Havens DS. Aiken LH. Shaping systems to promote desired outcomes: the magnet hospitals. J Nurs Admin 1999;29: 14-20. 19. Aiken LH, Sloan DM, Lake ET, Sochalski J, Weber AL. Organizations and outcomes of inpatient AIDS care. Med Care 1999;37:760-72. 20. Hofstadler R. Anti-intellectualism and American life. New York: Random House; 1962. 21. Christman L. Who is a nurse? Image J Nurs Schol 1998;30:211-4. 22. Anderson CA. Undereducated, aging, and …a cycle of decline? Nurs Outlook 2000;48:53-4. 23. Bednash G. The decreasing supply of registered nurses. JAMA 2000;283:2985-7. 24. Aiken LH, Sloan DM, Klocinski JL. Hospital nurses’ occupational exposure to blood. Am J Public Health 1997;87:103-7. 25. Department of Veteran Affairs. VA commits $50 million to new national nursing initiative [news release] 1998; December 18. Available from http://www.va.gov/pressrel/98nni.htm. 26. Ludmerer KM. Time to heal. New York: Oxford University Press; 1999. 27. McCabe S. Bringing psychiatric nursing into the 21st century. Arch Psychiatr Nurs 2000;14:109-17. 126 VOLUME 49 NUMBER 3 NURSING OUTLOOK MISSION STATEMENT Nursing Outlook, the official journal of the American Academy of Nursing, provides critical and timely anal- yses of emerging professional and health care issues of importance to all nurses. The primarily editorial goals of the Journal are to: 1. Publish innovative, original articles that stimulate thoughtful discussion and scholarly debate and policy implications among nurses and other health care professionals. 2. Inform readers about the diversity of opinion on controversial professional and health care and health policy matters affecting nursing and the health of the public. 3. Provide a multidisciplinary forum for the dissemination of information derived from the synthesis of extant knowledge of current and future clinical practice and health policy alternatives. 4. Disseminate information about creative, alternative, and forward-looking models of education and clin- ical practice as they relate to changing systems of health care. 5. Promote the synthesis and use of scientific knowledge in a timely fashion by nurses and other health care professionals to enhance the quality and efficiency of health care. 6. Provide information about leadership and leadership development opportunities for nurses, including professional meetings, hearings, forums, fellowships, and internships. 7. Provide the American Academy of Nursing with a medium for communicating important policy issues and organizational activities. 8. Increase critical awareness of technologies, products, and services that have the potential for increasing the effectiveness of nurses in all settings.

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Page 1: Mission statement

Horton-Deutsch and MohrThe Fading of Nursing Leadership

3. Dilts R. The new leadership paradigm: one of the most importantsets of skills: the article of the month, NLP. Santa Cruz (CA): Dilts;1996.

4. Hartz A, Krakauer H, Kuhn E. Hospital characteristics andmortality rates. N Engl J Med 1989;321:1720-5.

5. Mohr WK, Mahon MM. Dirty hands: the underside of market-place health care. Adv Nurs Sci 1996;19:28-37.

6. MacKinnon C. Feminism, Marxism, and the state. Signs 1982;7: 1-8.

7. Flax R. Postmodernism and gender relations in feminist theory. In:Nicholson LJ, editor. Feminism/post-modernism. New York:Routledge; 1990. p. 39-62.

8. Reverby SM. Ordered to care: the dilemma of American nursing1850-1945. Cambridge: University Press; 1987.

9. Ashley JA. Hospitals, paternalism, and the role of the nurse. NewYork: Columbia University Press; 1976.

10. Roberts SJ. Oppressed group behaviors: implications for nursing.Adv Nurs Sci 1983;5:21-30.

11. Freire P. Pedagogy of the oppressed. 2nd ed. New York: Continuum;2000.

12. Chambliss DF. Beyond caring: hospitals, nurses, and the socialorganization of ethics. Chicago: University of Chicago Press; 1998.

13. Kramer M, Schmalenberg C. Magnet hospitals, 1: institutions ofexcellence. J Nurs Admin 1998;18:13-24.

14. Aiken LH, Havens DS, Sloane DM. The magnet nursing servicerecognition program. Am J Nurs 2000;100:26-35.

15. Fagin C. Executive leadership: improving nursing practice, educa-tion, and research. J Nurs Admin 1996;26:30-7.

16. Trice H, Beyer J. The culture of work organizations. EnglewoodCliff (NJ): Prentice-Hall; 1993.

17. Kovner C, Gergen PJ. Nurse staffing levels and adverse eventsfollowing surgery in US hospitals. Image J Nurs Schol 1998;30:315-21.

18. Havens DS. Aiken LH. Shaping systems to promote desiredoutcomes: the magnet hospitals. J Nurs Admin 1999;29:14-20.

19. Aiken LH, Sloan DM, Lake ET, Sochalski J, Weber AL.Organizations and outcomes of inpatient AIDS care. Med Care1999;37:760-72.

20. Hofstadler R. Anti-intellectualism and American life. New York:Random House; 1962.

21. Christman L. Who is a nurse? Image J Nurs Schol 1998;30:211-4.22. Anderson CA. Undereducated, aging, and …a cycle of decline?

Nurs Outlook 2000;48:53-4.23. Bednash G. The decreasing supply of registered nurses. JAMA

2000;283:2985-7.24. Aiken LH, Sloan DM, Klocinski JL. Hospital nurses’ occupational

exposure to blood. Am J Public Health 1997;87:103-7.25. Department of Veteran Affairs. VA commits $50 million to new

national nursing initiative [news release] 1998; December 18.Available from http://www.va.gov/pressrel/98nni.htm.

26. Ludmerer KM. Time to heal. New York: Oxford University Press;1999.

27. McCabe S. Bringing psychiatric nursing into the 21st century. ArchPsychiatr Nurs 2000;14:109-17.

126 VOLUME 49 • NUMBER 3 NURSING OUTLOOK

MISSION STATEMENT

Nursing Outlook, the official journal of the American Academy of Nursing, provides critical and timely anal-yses of emerging professional and health care issues of importance to all nurses. The primarily editorial goalsof the Journal are to:

1. Publish innovative, original articles that stimulate thoughtful discussion and scholarly debate and policyimplications among nurses and other health care professionals.

2. Inform readers about the diversity of opinion on controversial professional and health care and healthpolicy matters affecting nursing and the health of the public.

3. Provide a multidisciplinary forum for the dissemination of information derived from the synthesis ofextant knowledge of current and future clinical practice and health policy alternatives.

4. Disseminate information about creative, alternative, and forward-looking models of education and clin-ical practice as they relate to changing systems of health care.

5. Promote the synthesis and use of scientific knowledge in a timely fashion by nurses and other health careprofessionals to enhance the quality and efficiency of health care.

6. Provide information about leadership and leadership development opportunities for nurses, includingprofessional meetings, hearings, forums, fellowships, and internships.

7. Provide the American Academy of Nursing with a medium for communicating important policy issuesand organizational activities.

8. Increase critical awareness of technologies, products, and services that have the potential for increasingthe effectiveness of nurses in all settings.