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570 council of the College of Surgeons, and lost it by the casting vote of the chairman, which result prevented him ever coming forward again for this office. He was an ex-pre- sident of the Irish Medical Association and of the Dublin Obstetrical Society, and filled other positions with credit and efficiency. ST. JOHN AMBULANCE ASSOCIATION. The annual meeting of the Dublin Centre of this Associa- tion was held on Saturday last in the Senate Hall of the Royal University of Ireland, when the Countess of Aberdeen distributed the awards of the Society. The St. John Medal ’, was bestowed on Dr. E. Charles Thompson for having risked I his life in order to save a child suffering from diphtheria. Dr. Thompson is the first on whom this distinction has been conferred in Ireland, and he is also the recipient of the Albert Medal for the same act of heroism. CITY OF DUBLIN HOSPITAL. By the bazaar recently held, this institution, which is one of the best-managed hospitals in Dublin, has obtained a sum of .62000 towards the funds of the charity. Robert Anderson, A.M., M.D., Professor of Natural History, Queen’s College, Galway, has been placed on the commission of the peace for the county of Down. Dublin, March 16th. PARIS. (From our own Correspondent.) THE PARIS FACULTY OF MEDICINE. THE summer session of the Paris Faculty of Medicine began to-day, the 16th inst., and will be continued in the following order:-Medical Natural History, Professor Baillon; Physiology, Professor Beclard; Surgical Patho- logy, Professor Guyom; Medical Jurisprudence, Professor Brouardel; Pharmacology, Professor Regnauld; Pathology and General Therapeutics, Professor Bouchard; Medical Pathology, Professor Damaschino; Experimental and Com- parative Pathology, Professor Vulpian ; Obstetrics, Professor Tarnier; Hygiene, Professor Proust; ialateria Medica and Therapeutics, Professor Hayem. Clinics : Medicine—Pro- fessor G. See, at the Hotel Dieu; Professor Hardy, La Charite; Professor Potain, Necker Hospital; Professor Jaccoud, La Pitie. Surgery-Professor Richet, Hotel Dieu; Professor Verneuil, La Pitie; Professor Trélat, La Charite ; Professor Le Fort, Necker Hospital. 1Iental Pathology and Diseases of the Encephalon-Professor Ball, at the St. Anne Asylum. Diseases of Children-Professor Grancher. Syphi- litic and Cutaneous Affections-Professor Fournier, at the St. Louis Hospital. Diseases of the Nervous System-Pro- fessor Charcot, at the Salpetriere. Ophthalmology-Professor Panas, at the Hocel Dieu. Clinical Obstetrics—Professor Pajot. PROPHYLACTIC MEASURES AGAINST COLD. At a recent meeting of the Société de Biologie, Professor Brown-Sequard read a paper on the Prophylactic Means to be adopted against Accidents resulting from Cold, which he founded on the following theory:-" The neck is one of the regions of the body the most sensitive to cold ; there is no doubt that a great number of accidents, such as coryza, laryngitis, bronchitis, cystitis, enteritis, &c., which are reflex phenomena, result from the impression of cold on the nerves of the skin of the neck." To avoid these accidents, M. Brown-Sequard recommends the blowing on the neck with the bellows of warm air, which should be gradually cooled, by which means the neck is rendered less sensitive to the action of cold. The Professor found that ten sittings were sufficient to produce effect. A VISIT TO M. PASTEUR’S LABORATORY. I paid a visit this morning to 11. Pasteur’s laboratory in the Rue d’Ulm, where he performs his anti-rabic inocula- tions. The sight to be there witnessed is most interesting and curious, for one meets persons of both sexes, of all ages and conditions of life, the poorer classes being in greater number, even people from different parts of the world- Italians, English, Americans, Russians, Poles, &c.,--who were there assembled to submit themselves to M. Pasteur’s treat- ment. The inoculations are performed by Dr. Grancher with a hypodermic syringe in presence of M. Pasteur, and he does from sixty to eighty every m rning. The instru- ment, which is two-thirds full of the inoculating liquid for adults and one-third for youths and children, is thrust into one or other flank, and this operation is repeated every day for ten consecutive mornings. The composition, or rather the con- stitution, of the liquid employed is known only to M. Pasteur, who manufactures it in his own laboratory. Dr. Grancher told me that as yet no accidents had occurred in the way of abscesses &c., and that the patients go through the pro- cess without any constitutional disturbance. It struck me, however, that many of the applicants had been driven there, more from fright than necessity, as in many cases they did not wait to ascertain whether the dogs that bit them were really rabid. In some cases they were not even bitten. For instance, I saw a young English lady who submitted to the operation simply because she had been licked in the mouth by her dog, which had no signs of madness. I met there also Dr. Hime of Bradford, who came over with his party of seven persons, consisting of four little boys, a little girl, a youth, and a man, who Dr. Hime told me were bitten on Jan. 24th by a dog which was ascertained to have been indubitably rabid, as another person who was bitten at the same time by the same dog died soon after from hydro- phobia. M. Pasteur had just received a telegram from Berlin to say that nineteen persons bitten by a rabid wolf were forwarded to Paris to undergo his treatment. Sub- scriptions for a suitable building are pouring in from all quarters, and the Paris Municipal Conseil has under its con- sideration a proposition for the immediate construction of the Pasteur Institute. APPOINTMENTS AT THE VETERINARY SCHOOLS. M. Chauveau, Director of the Veterinary School of Lyons has been appointed Inspector-General of the Veterinary Schools of France, in lieu of M. Henri Bouley, deceased; Professor Arloing is appointed Director of the Veterinary School of Lyons in succession to M. Chauveau. Paris, March 16th. MEDICAL NOTES IN PARLIAMENT. Inoculation for Hydrophobia, IN the House of Commons, on the llth inst., in reply to Sir H. Roscoe, Mr. Chamberlain stated that his attention had been called to the reported discovery by M. Pasteur of a cure for hydrophobia. The recognised eminence of Af . Pasteur as a scientific investigator, and the great interest and importance which attach to the subject of his recent inquiries, seemed to justify a careful and impartial examina- tion of the results obtained. At present the information on the matter in the possession of the Local Government Board was too vague and incomplete to afford materials for a full appreciation of M. Pasteur’s process. He would consider how such an investigation as might enable a just estimate to be formed as to the reliability of M. Pasteur’s method and its applicability to this country could be most satisfactorily conducted, and would confer with the Chancellor of the Exchequer with reference to the question of the expense. Fever at Port Royal. In reply to Sir J. Goldsmid, Mr. Hibbert stated that he regretted to have to say that since October, 1885, nineteen cases of yellow fever had been admitted into Jamaica Hospital from the Urgent, of which number four had terminated fatally. Besides these, an officer who was on board waiting to join the Wye was attacked and died. There had been one other case-from the Tyne. There was no " sanatorium or hill station attached to Jamaica Hos- pital ; nor was it thought by the medical advisers of the Government that any such establishment was necessary for such cases of infectious disease, as Port Royal was so swept by the sea breezes that it was considered mure healthy than a hill station. The Hampstead and Homerton Hospitals. On the 12th inst,, in answer to Mr. Gibb, Mr. Chamberlain said that the Hampstead Hospital had not been used for any small-pox patients since July of last year, and if in tha event of any epidemic it should be necessary again to use it for small-pox patients it would only be for a very limited number, and in the cases only of patients who, from the acute nature of the disease, could not be removed to any hospital at a distance. The report of Mr. Shirley Murphy had not yet been officially considered by the managers, and consequently no steps had been taken to test the conclusions

MEDICAL NOTES IN PARLIAMENT

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council of the College of Surgeons, and lost it by the castingvote of the chairman, which result prevented him evercoming forward again for this office. He was an ex-pre-sident of the Irish Medical Association and of the DublinObstetrical Society, and filled other positions with creditand efficiency.

ST. JOHN AMBULANCE ASSOCIATION.

The annual meeting of the Dublin Centre of this Associa-tion was held on Saturday last in the Senate Hall of theRoyal University of Ireland, when the Countess of Aberdeendistributed the awards of the Society. The St. John Medal ’,was bestowed on Dr. E. Charles Thompson for having risked Ihis life in order to save a child suffering from diphtheria.Dr. Thompson is the first on whom this distinction has beenconferred in Ireland, and he is also the recipient of theAlbert Medal for the same act of heroism.

CITY OF DUBLIN HOSPITAL.

By the bazaar recently held, this institution, which is oneof the best-managed hospitals in Dublin, has obtained a sumof .62000 towards the funds of the charity.Robert Anderson, A.M., M.D., Professor of Natural History,

Queen’s College, Galway, has been placed on the commissionof the peace for the county of Down.

Dublin, March 16th.

PARIS.

(From our own Correspondent.)

THE PARIS FACULTY OF MEDICINE.

THE summer session of the Paris Faculty of Medicinebegan to-day, the 16th inst., and will be continued in thefollowing order:-Medical Natural History, ProfessorBaillon; Physiology, Professor Beclard; Surgical Patho-logy, Professor Guyom; Medical Jurisprudence, ProfessorBrouardel; Pharmacology, Professor Regnauld; Pathologyand General Therapeutics, Professor Bouchard; Medical

Pathology, Professor Damaschino; Experimental and Com-parative Pathology, Professor Vulpian ; Obstetrics, ProfessorTarnier; Hygiene, Professor Proust; ialateria Medica andTherapeutics, Professor Hayem. Clinics : Medicine—Pro-fessor G. See, at the Hotel Dieu; Professor Hardy, LaCharite; Professor Potain, Necker Hospital; ProfessorJaccoud, La Pitie. Surgery-Professor Richet, Hotel Dieu;Professor Verneuil, La Pitie; Professor Trélat, La Charite ;Professor Le Fort, Necker Hospital. 1Iental Pathology andDiseases of the Encephalon-Professor Ball, at the St. AnneAsylum. Diseases of Children-Professor Grancher. Syphi-litic and Cutaneous Affections-Professor Fournier, at theSt. Louis Hospital. Diseases of the Nervous System-Pro-fessor Charcot, at the Salpetriere. Ophthalmology-ProfessorPanas, at the Hocel Dieu. Clinical Obstetrics—Professor Pajot.

PROPHYLACTIC MEASURES AGAINST COLD.

At a recent meeting of the Société de Biologie, ProfessorBrown-Sequard read a paper on the Prophylactic Means tobe adopted against Accidents resulting from Cold, which hefounded on the following theory:-" The neck is one of theregions of the body the most sensitive to cold ; there is nodoubt that a great number of accidents, such as coryza,laryngitis, bronchitis, cystitis, enteritis, &c., which are reflexphenomena, result from the impression of cold on thenerves of the skin of the neck." To avoid these accidents,M. Brown-Sequard recommends the blowing on the neckwith the bellows of warm air, which should be graduallycooled, by which means the neck is rendered less sensitiveto the action of cold. The Professor found that ten sittingswere sufficient to produce effect.

A VISIT TO M. PASTEUR’S LABORATORY.I paid a visit this morning to 11. Pasteur’s laboratory in

the Rue d’Ulm, where he performs his anti-rabic inocula-tions. The sight to be there witnessed is most interestingand curious, for one meets persons of both sexes, of all agesand conditions of life, the poorer classes being in greaternumber, even people from different parts of the world-Italians, English, Americans, Russians, Poles, &c.,--who were

there assembled to submit themselves to M. Pasteur’s treat-ment. The inoculations are performed by Dr. Grancherwith a hypodermic syringe in presence of M. Pasteur, andhe does from sixty to eighty every m rning. The instru-

ment, which is two-thirds full of the inoculating liquid foradults and one-third for youths and children, is thrust intoone or other flank, and this operation is repeated every day forten consecutive mornings. The composition, or rather the con-stitution, of the liquid employed is known only to M. Pasteur,who manufactures it in his own laboratory. Dr. Granchertold me that as yet no accidents had occurred in the wayof abscesses &c., and that the patients go through the pro-cess without any constitutional disturbance. It struck me,however, that many of the applicants had been driven there,more from fright than necessity, as in many cases they didnot wait to ascertain whether the dogs that bit them werereally rabid. In some cases they were not even bitten.For instance, I saw a young English lady who submittedto the operation simply because she had been licked inthe mouth by her dog, which had no signs of madness.I met there also Dr. Hime of Bradford, who came over withhis party of seven persons, consisting of four little boys, alittle girl, a youth, and a man, who Dr. Hime told me werebitten on Jan. 24th by a dog which was ascertained to havebeen indubitably rabid, as another person who was bitten atthe same time by the same dog died soon after from hydro-phobia. M. Pasteur had just received a telegram fromBerlin to say that nineteen persons bitten by a rabid wolfwere forwarded to Paris to undergo his treatment. Sub-scriptions for a suitable building are pouring in from allquarters, and the Paris Municipal Conseil has under its con-sideration a proposition for the immediate construction ofthe Pasteur Institute.

APPOINTMENTS AT THE VETERINARY SCHOOLS.

M. Chauveau, Director of the Veterinary School of Lyonshas been appointed Inspector-General of the VeterinarySchools of France, in lieu of M. Henri Bouley, deceased;Professor Arloing is appointed Director of the VeterinarySchool of Lyons in succession to M. Chauveau.

Paris, March 16th.

MEDICAL NOTES IN PARLIAMENT.

Inoculation for Hydrophobia,IN the House of Commons, on the llth inst., in reply to

Sir H. Roscoe, Mr. Chamberlain stated that his attention hadbeen called to the reported discovery by M. Pasteur ofa cure for hydrophobia. The recognised eminence ofAf . Pasteur as a scientific investigator, and the great interestand importance which attach to the subject of his recentinquiries, seemed to justify a careful and impartial examina-tion of the results obtained. At present the information onthe matter in the possession of the Local Government Boardwas too vague and incomplete to afford materials for a fullappreciation of M. Pasteur’s process. He would considerhow such an investigation as might enable a just estimate tobe formed as to the reliability of M. Pasteur’s method andits applicability to this country could be most satisfactorilyconducted, and would confer with the Chancellor of theExchequer with reference to the question of the expense.

Fever at Port Royal.In reply to Sir J. Goldsmid, Mr. Hibbert stated that he

regretted to have to say that since October, 1885, nineteencases of yellow fever had been admitted into JamaicaHospital from the Urgent, of which number four hadterminated fatally. Besides these, an officer who was onboard waiting to join the Wye was attacked and died.There had been one other case-from the Tyne. There wasno " sanatorium or hill station attached to Jamaica Hos-pital ; nor was it thought by the medical advisers of theGovernment that any such establishment was necessary forsuch cases of infectious disease, as Port Royal was so sweptby the sea breezes that it was considered mure healthy thana hill station.

The Hampstead and Homerton Hospitals.On the 12th inst,, in answer to Mr. Gibb, Mr. Chamberlain

said that the Hampstead Hospital had not been used for anysmall-pox patients since July of last year, and if in thaevent of any epidemic it should be necessary again to use itfor small-pox patients it would only be for a very limitednumber, and in the cases only of patients who, from theacute nature of the disease, could not be removed to anyhospital at a distance. The report of Mr. Shirley Murphyhad not yet been officially considered by the managers, andconsequently no steps had been taken to test the conclusions

571

.at which he had arrived. With regard to the IIomertonHospital, the managers had made such arrangements aswould, it was believed, prevent the occurrence in the future ofsuch abuses as formed the subject of the recent inquiry, andit did not appear to the Local Goverment Board that therewould be any sufficient advantage in a further inquiry by aRoyal Commission or a Select Committee.

The Indian Medical Service.In reply to Sir G. Hunter, Sir W. Kay-Shuttleworth

stated that the option of attending the Aldershot course ofinstruction, which in August, 1882, had been given to Indianmedical officers passing through Netley. was inadvertentlywithdrawn in April, 1884, on the introduction at Netley of,a course of bearer company drill. This, however, would nowbe corrected; and as the Aldershot course must be optionalfor Indian officers, a reference would be made to the Govern-ment of India as to the instruction in that country of thoseofficers who have not passed the Aldershot course.

Contagious Diseases Acts.On the 16th inst. Mr. Stansfeld moved that the Contagious

Diseases Acts, 1866-69, ought to be repealed. The wholesubject had been worn threadbare long ago, and no newarguments were adduced either for or against this class oflegislation. Mr. Puleston, as representing a garrison townin which the compulsory treatment had been enforced, spokeof the value of the Acts as a repressive and reclamatoryagency, and he read a letter from the Town Clerk of Devon-port urging that the supporters of the Acts had wavered nota jot in their opinion as to the usefulness in the interestsof health and morality of the measure Mr. Stansfeld soughtto annul. Sir John Kennaway tried to effect a compromise;but it was admitted on both sides of the House that thefeeling of the country was adverse to the Acts, and whenthe matter came to a division the amendment was negativedby a considerable majority-245 to 131. The motion wasthen agreed to without a division.On the 17th inst. Mr. Stansfeld moved for leave to bring

in aBillto repeal the Acts, but Mr. Bentinck objected, and asit was past the hour at which opposed business could betaken the motion dropped.

The Medical Act of 1858.On the 16th inst., in answer to Dr. Foster, Sir L. Playfair

stated that a Bill was being drafted, and would, he hoped, beshortly introduced, to amend the Medical Act of 1858. Itwill contain provisions to give direct representation to themedical profession on the General Medical Council.

-Rags from Spain.In answer to Mr. Hunter, Mr. Trevelyan said that he had

recently approved of an order issued by the Board of Super-vision prohibiting the importation of rags from Spain forsome months, and had received various recommendations asto the necessity of further legislation, which would have hiscareful consideration.

THE SERVICES

INDIA OFFICE.—The Queen has approved of the restora- Ition of the undermentioned officer from the half-pay list tothe effective list:-Surgeon George Augustus Cones, of theBengal Army.The Queen has approved of the following promotion made

by the Governments in India:—Surgeon-Major Benjamin’Thomas Saffrein, of the Madras Medical Establishment, tobe Brigade Surgeon.ADMIRALTY. - The following appointments have been

made:—Surgeon William E. Breton, M.D., to the Revenge;Surgeon Hugh W. Macnamara, to the Asia ; Surgeon RobertM’lvor, to Plymouth Hospital; Surgeon John A. M’Adam, tothe Indus; Surgeon A. H. Miller, to Royal Marine Depot,Walmer; Surgeon James H. Beattie, to the Vernon; SurgeonRichard A. Fitch, to the Cambridge ; and Surgeon W. Spry,to the Boscawen.ARTILLERY VOLUNTEERS.—1st Cheshire and Carnarvon-

shire : Arthur Montfort Archer, Gent., M.B., to be Acting-’Surgeon.

A SUM of 120,000 marks (£6000) has been left tothe University of Rostock, for the erection of an ophthalmichospital.

Obituary., JOHN STORRAR, M.D.LoND.

Dit. STORRAR was so well; known to everyone connectedwith the University of London as its oldest surviving medicalgraduate, and for twenty-one years its chairman of Convo-cation, that his death on the 10th inst. at Blackheath will

,

be felt by most of the graduates as a personal loss. He wasborn in 1811, and was educated at University College. Hetook his M.D. degree in 1839, with the late Dr. John Taylor,and they were the first medical graduates of the University.Without a qualification from either of the Royal Collegeshe practised for several years in Brook-street, and waslargely instrumental in securing the passing of the MedicalGraduates Act of 1858, by which the members of the Univer-sity of London were given the same privileges to practisemedicine as were enjoyed by the graduates of Oxford andCambridge, without becoming Members of the Royal Collegeof Physicians. Dr. Storrar’s position in this matter wasreally made a test case. He was for many years secretaryto Dr. Somerville, a former inspector of anatomy. TheGeneral Medical Council was first constituted in 1858, and onits formation Dr. Storrar was appointed on that body as therepresentative of the University of London, and had continuedas such up to the present time. He was an ardent enthusiastin improving medical education, on the general and scientificlines adopted by his University, and could always be reliedon to oppose firmly but courteously any proposition tendingto lower medical standards, or to depreciate universityinfluences in favour of the corporations. If he erred in thesematters, it was from a thorough belief that nearly all recentadvantages in medical education were due to the initiativeand example of the University of London. He was also oneof the early reformers ’of that University, who, after a tenyears’ struggle with the Senate, obtained a new charter fromthe Crown by which the members of Convocation wereallowed to return Fellows to the Senate, and thus have avoice in the management of its affairs. Dr. Storrar was oneof the first members of the Senate elected by the votes of thegraduates in Convocation, and he always referred to this asone of the greatest honours in his life. His attendance at themeetings of the Senate was a model of regularity, and hisknowledge of the details of its business was most minute andaccurate, perhaps only surpassed by that of Dr. Carpenter,the late registrar. On the retirement of Dr. Foster, in 1864,he was appointed chairman of Convocation, and filled thepost until last year, when he retired in consequence of his in-creasing deafness, and a liability to bronchitic attacks, whichunfitted him for duties involving evening sittings in severeweather. He was also chairman of the Annual Committee,and rarely missed a meeting. The views of Convocationwere always urged by him in the Senate, and members werequite sure that they would be pressed, even if personally hewas not in entire sympathy with them. He was always, ashe expressed it, the " devoted" servant of the graduates inConvocation. Dr. Storrar also served on the EndowedSchools Inquiry Commission, to which so many of our edu-cational reforms are due, was a life governor of UniversityCollege, and a governor of the Harpur Trust at Bedford, asthe representative of the University of London. He was aman of fine presence and dignified manners; he enteredzealously into all questions connected with the University,and fought for his views with all honesty and public spirit,and was always ready to hold out to his opponents thehand of friendship when the question was decided. Hisdeath has caused a void in the University ranks which willbe long felt. -

MR. C. LE VESCONTE GODFRAY.THE island of Jersey has sustained a severe loss by the

death of Mr. C. le V. Godfray, which took place on the12th inst. Mr. Godfray was the son of a distinguishedlawyer. lIe received his medical education at St. Bar-tholomew’s Hospital, and became M.R.C.S. in 1859, andL.S.A. in 1860. Soon after he qualified he was appointedsurgeon to the Jersey General Hospital, succeeding the lateMr. Jones, who achieved a European celebrity as one of thefirst advocates of excision of the knee-joint. Mr. Godfrayhad a very large general practice, but surgery was hisfavourite branch, and, with the only good surgical field in