2
301 was made for the twofold purpose of showing, first, that to my regret I had been (I believe) wilfully misled by a statement which the editor of that journal (Dr. Carpenter, I presume) had thought proper to make privately to myself, for the pur- pose of justifying the publication of an insolent and malicious attack upon my character; and, secondly, that I had obtained sufficient evidence for my assertion, that the editor’s state- ment was, " on the face of it, a falsehood." I really thought the following passage from my letter sufficiently explicit to prevent any such misapprehension of my meaning as Mr. Luke and his friends entertained :- "But, Sir, I aver, and will prove, that the article was written by a person comparatively as ignorant of the subject as the editor appears to be of the first principles of honour and justice; and, therefore, that the statement of its having been declared to be ’perfectly just’ by ’a London Hospital Surgeon,’ or, if the Editor prefers it, by’ ‘a Surgeon to a London Hospital, distinguished for his acquaintance with the subject,’ is, on the face of it, a falsehood." Mr. Luke continues to complain that I did not publish his letter with those of Mr. Key and Mr. Lawrence; but I really did not see the slightest necessity for it, nor do I feel that in withholding it I am open to the imputation of having practised reserve. Mr. Luke’s letter was intended simply to correct an unfounded impression; and the occasion which called it forth having, in my opinion, passed away with the mutual explana- tion that followed, I did not for a moment deem it requisite that I should do more than convey to the minds of your readers, in as concise a manner as possible, what I conceived to be its chief purport. I have no wish that the letter should not see the light; and, as far as I am concerned, Mr. Luke is quite at liberty to do whatever he may think proper with it. The letters of Mr. Lawrence and Mr. Key, on the other hand, were of very different import, and were made public by me, after giving some examples of the grossest ignorance that was ever displayed in a journal of equal pretensions, in order to coun- teract the impression which its " Sir Oracle" intended to pro- duce on the minds of the profession at large. I beg again, in conclusion, to state that I have never for a moment seriously entertained the thought that either Mr, Luke or his colleagues had any connexion with the opinion relative to the review in question, which has been, so un- worthily, "an apple of discord;" and if any statement which I have made has led your readers to believe that Mr. Luke had been, or could be, guilty of unfairness" to myself 01 any one else, I trust I have said enough to show that I novel meant that such an interpretation should be placed upon it. T have thf bnnnnr tn be. Sir. your obedient servant. JOHN GAY. - - __._ ... _.. Finsbury-place South, March, 1849. Medical News. APOTHECARIES’ HALL.-Names of gentlemen who passed their examination in the science and practice of medicine, and received certificates to practise, on Thursday, March 8th, 1849. DAVIDSON, FREDERICK MONTGOMERIE DAVENPORT, Dawlish, Devon. JOHNSON, WILLIAM HENRY, Weymouth, Dorset. LEECH, HENRY PAYNE, Bury St. Edmunds. OUGHTON, FREDERICK, Camberwell. WELSH, FRANCIS FAWCETT, Saffron-Walden, Essex. WILTS LUNATIC ASYLUM.—The committee of visitors have, out of a list of upwards of thirty candidates, appointed Dr. Thurnam, of the Retreat, near York, to the important and re- sponsible situation of medical superintendent-an appoint- ment which has, we understand, given the greatest satisfac- tion. The plan of the proposed building, furnished by T. H. Wyatt, Esq., has met with the approval of the secretary of state; all that now remains is to advertise for tenders, and to commence the building without delay.—Salisbury and Win chester Journal. THE CHOLERA IN FRANCE.-At Raches, a village situated near Douai, the cholera is making sad havoc. Up to the 15th of February there had been 27 cases and 9 deaths in this little place. Letters from St. L6, of the 19th of February, state that the disease has been reigning for the last six weeks at Dieppe; from the city it is now spreading into the suburbs, A mother who was nursing a child stricken with cholera, died of the disease soon afterwards. M. Houvernilt, mayoI of the village of Wissant, near Calais, has just died oi cholera; and the mayor of Guines (M. Dumbron) has alsc fallen a victim to the disease. In this latter place and neigh- bourhood the epidemic has carried off more than one hundred persons; there were as many as six and eight burials in oue day, which for so small a town is enormous. The disease has, however, disappeared almost completely. TYPHUS IN ITALY.-Typhus is making extensive ravages in the province of Aosta (Piedmont). The Sardinian govern- ment has just sent Dr. Zanetti thither, with the view of ob- taining an accurate report of the actual state of the province. APPOINTMENT.—Professor Cantee has just been maintained for five more years in the office of dean of the medical faculty of Turin. Expulsion.—Dr. Loudon, one of the official examiners of the medical faculty of Berlin, has just been expelled from the Prussian capital, on account of the active share he took in late disturbances there. MEDICO-ETHICAL SOCIETY, MANCHESTER.-The first annual dinner of this Society was held on Saturday evening, February 24th,-Dr. J. L. Bardsley in the chair. The Chairman, after dinner, remarked that Mr. Allen, the founder of the associa- tion, had met with most able coadjutors. The present strength of the Society was sixty-nine members, comprising the names of some who had not only adorned their calling by their conduct in the particular localities in which they resided, but whose researches and writings had advanced the practice and the cause of the medical profession. He alluded to an objection which he had heard that the association partook of the cha- racter of a medical inquisition. Now, in only one instance, had the committee- been appealed to in its judicial character; and some of their friends, so far from considering the Society inquisitorial, had availed themselves of its instrumentality for the adjustment of professional misunderstandings, and the maintenance of professional etiquette. It was one of the great objects of the Society not to encourage, but to prevent, disagreements amongst medical men. The end and,aim of the institution was the maintenance and advancement of the respectability of the profession. Mr. Allen stated that the secre- taries had been in correspondence with gentlemen at Liver- pool, Warrington, and Stockport, respecting the formation of medico-ethical associations in those towns. Two cases of private grievances had been adjusted by the Society within the last fortnight, and two other cases had been sent in for consideration, provided an agreement was not made in the meantime. He referred to the admirable working of the code of etiquette. Rules were said to be altogether unnecessary among gentlemen. He submitted that rules could regulate gentlemen, and hence the advantage of uniformity of action. The advantage, utility, and practicability of rules were ad- mitted by other professions, and why not with them ? The committee of the association,in tended to direct their attention to cases of illegal practice in this town, by which so much injury was done to the profession as well as to the public. The law was most defective with regard to such cases. It was very evident, therefore, they could only be reached through the legislature; and here was to his own mind suggested a most important argument in favour of the necessity of com- bination in the medical profession. Dr. Bardsley, sen., Mr. Wilson, and many other gentlemen addressed the meeting, which appeared to have conferred general satisfaction. (We regret that we have not space for a longer report.) MEDICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON.—The seventy-sixth anniversary meeting of the Society was held on Thursday, March 8th,.at the Albion Tavern,-the President, Mr. Hancock, in the chair. The Oration was given by Dr. Hughes Willshire, and was entitled the " Moral Aspects of Medical Life." The Fother- gillian gold medal was given to John Milligan, Esq., of Keighley, Yorkshire, and the silver medal to Dr. Willshire. The following gentlemen were elected office-bearers for the ensuing session :—President : H. Hancock, Esq.—Vice-Presi- dents: Dr. Chowne, Mr. Dendy, Dr. Waller, and Mr. Hird,- Treasurer: Mr. Clifton,—Librarian. Mr. Harrison,—Secre- taries in Ordinary: Dr. Smiles and Dr. Bowie,-S’ecretary for Foreign Correspondence: Dr. Davidson,—Councillors : Messrs. Eales, Headland, Hutchinson, Linnecar, Middleton, Pilcher, Holding, Robarts, Stedman, Drs. Clutterbuck, Rowland, Lever, Crisp, Mr. Harvey, Dr. Willshire, Mr. Barlow, Mr. Todd, Mr. Lowe, Dr. G. Bird, and Dr. Cogswell,—Fellow to deliver the Oration in 1850 : Mr. Hilton. The Fellows of the Society and their friends, to the number of nearly sixty, sat down afterwards to an excellent dinner. The conviviality was kept up to a late hour. FUNERAL OF MR. PENNINGTON.—The remains of this re- spected member of our profession were interred on Wednesday last, at the Foundling Hospital. The procession was joined by a great number of .medical men.

Medical News

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: Medical News

301

was made for the twofold purpose of showing, first, that to myregret I had been (I believe) wilfully misled by a statementwhich the editor of that journal (Dr. Carpenter, I presume)had thought proper to make privately to myself, for the pur-pose of justifying the publication of an insolent and maliciousattack upon my character; and, secondly, that I had obtainedsufficient evidence for my assertion, that the editor’s state-ment was,

" on the face of it, a falsehood."

I really thought the following passage from my lettersufficiently explicit to prevent any such misapprehension ofmy meaning as Mr. Luke and his friends entertained :-"But, Sir, I aver, and will prove, that the article was

written by a person comparatively as ignorant of the subjectas the editor appears to be of the first principles of honourand justice; and, therefore, that the statement of its having beendeclared to be ’perfectly just’ by ’a London Hospital Surgeon,’or, if the Editor prefers it, by’ ‘a Surgeon to a London Hospital,distinguished for his acquaintance with the subject,’ is, on the faceof it, a falsehood."Mr. Luke continues to complain that I did not publish his

letter with those of Mr. Key and Mr. Lawrence; but I reallydid not see the slightest necessity for it, nor do I feel that inwithholding it I am open to the imputation of having practisedreserve. Mr. Luke’s letter was intended simply to correct anunfounded impression; and the occasion which called it forthhaving, in my opinion, passed away with the mutual explana-tion that followed, I did not for a moment deem it requisitethat I should do more than convey to the minds of your readers,in as concise a manner as possible, what I conceived to beits chief purport. I have no wish that the letter should notsee the light; and, as far as I am concerned, Mr. Luke is quiteat liberty to do whatever he may think proper with it. Theletters of Mr. Lawrence and Mr. Key, on the other hand, wereof very different import, and were made public by me, aftergiving some examples of the grossest ignorance that was everdisplayed in a journal of equal pretensions, in order to coun-teract the impression which its " Sir Oracle" intended to pro-duce on the minds of the profession at large.

I beg again, in conclusion, to state that I have never for amoment seriously entertained the thought that either Mr,Luke or his colleagues had any connexion with the opinionrelative to the review in question, which has been, so un-worthily, "an apple of discord;" and if any statement whichI have made has led your readers to believe that Mr. Lukehad been, or could be, guilty of unfairness" to myself 01any one else, I trust I have said enough to show that I novelmeant that such an interpretation should be placed upon it.

T have thf bnnnnr tn be. Sir. your obedient servant.JOHN GAY.

- - __._ ... _..

Finsbury-place South, March, 1849.

Medical News.APOTHECARIES’ HALL.-Names of gentlemen who passed

their examination in the science and practice of medicine,and received certificates to practise, on Thursday,

March 8th, 1849.DAVIDSON, FREDERICK MONTGOMERIE DAVENPORT, Dawlish,

Devon.JOHNSON, WILLIAM HENRY, Weymouth, Dorset.LEECH, HENRY PAYNE, Bury St. Edmunds.OUGHTON, FREDERICK, Camberwell.WELSH, FRANCIS FAWCETT, Saffron-Walden, Essex.WILTS LUNATIC ASYLUM.—The committee of visitors have,

out of a list of upwards of thirty candidates, appointed Dr.Thurnam, of the Retreat, near York, to the important and re-sponsible situation of medical superintendent-an appoint-ment which has, we understand, given the greatest satisfac-tion. The plan of the proposed building, furnished by T. H.Wyatt, Esq., has met with the approval of the secretary ofstate; all that now remains is to advertise for tenders, and tocommence the building without delay.—Salisbury and Winchester Journal.THE CHOLERA IN FRANCE.-At Raches, a village situated

near Douai, the cholera is making sad havoc. Up to the 15thof February there had been 27 cases and 9 deaths in this littleplace. Letters from St. L6, of the 19th of February, statethat the disease has been reigning for the last six weeks atDieppe; from the city it is now spreading into the suburbs,A mother who was nursing a child stricken with cholera,died of the disease soon afterwards. M. Houvernilt, mayoIof the village of Wissant, near Calais, has just died oicholera; and the mayor of Guines (M. Dumbron) has alsc

fallen a victim to the disease. In this latter place and neigh-bourhood the epidemic has carried off more than one hundredpersons; there were as many as six and eight burials in oueday, which for so small a town is enormous. The disease has,however, disappeared almost completely.TYPHUS IN ITALY.-Typhus is making extensive ravages in

the province of Aosta (Piedmont). The Sardinian govern-ment has just sent Dr. Zanetti thither, with the view of ob-taining an accurate report of the actual state of the province.

APPOINTMENT.—Professor Cantee has just been maintainedfor five more years in the office of dean of the medical facultyof Turin.

Expulsion.—Dr. Loudon, one of the official examiners ofthe medical faculty of Berlin, has just been expelled from thePrussian capital, on account of the active share he took in latedisturbances there.MEDICO-ETHICAL SOCIETY, MANCHESTER.-The first annual

dinner of this Society was held on Saturday evening, February24th,-Dr. J. L. Bardsley in the chair. The Chairman, afterdinner, remarked that Mr. Allen, the founder of the associa-tion, had met with most able coadjutors. The present strengthof the Society was sixty-nine members, comprising the names ofsome who had not only adorned their calling by their conductin the particular localities in which they resided, but whoseresearches and writings had advanced the practice and thecause of the medical profession. He alluded to an objectionwhich he had heard that the association partook of the cha-racter of a medical inquisition. Now, in only one instance,had the committee- been appealed to in its judicial character;and some of their friends, so far from considering the Societyinquisitorial, had availed themselves of its instrumentality forthe adjustment of professional misunderstandings, and themaintenance of professional etiquette. It was one of thegreat objects of the Society not to encourage, but to prevent,disagreements amongst medical men. The end and,aim ofthe institution was the maintenance and advancement of therespectability of the profession. Mr. Allen stated that the secre-taries had been in correspondence with gentlemen at Liver-pool, Warrington, and Stockport, respecting the formation ofmedico-ethical associations in those towns. Two cases ofprivate grievances had been adjusted by the Society withinthe last fortnight, and two other cases had been sent in forconsideration, provided an agreement was not made in themeantime. He referred to the admirable working of the codeof etiquette. Rules were said to be altogether unnecessaryamong gentlemen. He submitted that rules could regulategentlemen, and hence the advantage of uniformity of action.The advantage, utility, and practicability of rules were ad-mitted by other professions, and why not with them ? Thecommittee of the association,in tended to direct their attentionto cases of illegal practice in this town, by which so muchinjury was done to the profession as well as to the public. Thelaw was most defective with regard to such cases. It wasvery evident, therefore, they could only be reached throughthe legislature; and here was to his own mind suggested amost important argument in favour of the necessity of com-bination in the medical profession. Dr. Bardsley, sen., Mr.Wilson, and many other gentlemen addressed the meeting,which appeared to have conferred general satisfaction. (Weregret that we have not space for a longer report.)MEDICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON.—The seventy-sixth anniversary

meeting of the Society was held on Thursday, March 8th,.atthe Albion Tavern,-the President, Mr. Hancock, in the chair.The Oration was given by Dr. Hughes Willshire, and wasentitled the " Moral Aspects of Medical Life." The Fother-gillian gold medal was given to John Milligan, Esq., ofKeighley, Yorkshire, and the silver medal to Dr. Willshire.The following gentlemen were elected office-bearers for theensuing session :—President : H. Hancock, Esq.—Vice-Presi-dents: Dr. Chowne, Mr. Dendy, Dr. Waller, and Mr. Hird,-Treasurer: Mr. Clifton,—Librarian. Mr. Harrison,—Secre-taries in Ordinary: Dr. Smiles and Dr. Bowie,-S’ecretary forForeign Correspondence: Dr. Davidson,—Councillors : Messrs.Eales, Headland, Hutchinson, Linnecar, Middleton, Pilcher,Holding, Robarts, Stedman, Drs. Clutterbuck, Rowland,Lever, Crisp, Mr. Harvey, Dr. Willshire, Mr. Barlow, Mr.Todd, Mr. Lowe, Dr. G. Bird, and Dr. Cogswell,—Fellow todeliver the Oration in 1850 : Mr. Hilton. The Fellows of theSociety and their friends, to the number of nearly sixty, satdown afterwards to an excellent dinner. The convivialitywas kept up to a late hour.FUNERAL OF MR. PENNINGTON.—The remains of this re-

spected member of our profession were interred on Wednesdaylast, at the Foundling Hospital. The procession was joinedby a great number of .medical men.

Page 2: Medical News

302

DEATH OF MR. ANTHONY WHITE.-This gentleman, so longand deservedly well known and esteemed as surgeon to theWestminster Hospital, expired on the 9th instant, at hisresidence in Parliament-street, at an advanced age. Weshall present our readers with a short memoir of this distin-guished surgeon in our next number.NORTH LONDON INFIRMIARY.—The funds of this public in-

stitution have just been augmented by the donation of thirtypounds from Richard Twining, Sen., Esq. In considerationof the exertions of their late benevolent physician, Dr. Wil-liam Twining, the governors have called one of the wards the" William Twining ward." This gentleman was the son ofthe above donor to the infirmary.

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS.—We have been informed, on goodauthority, that at the next meeting of the comitia majora,the question of instituting legal proceedings by the solicitorof the college, against Richard Dawson, of Finsbury Circus,for assuming the title of " Licentiate of the Royal Collegeof Physicians, London," he not being a licentiate, and neverhaving passed the examination as such, will be consideredby the fellows.

LECTURES ON GENERATION OF THE INVERTEBRATA.-ProfessorOwen has delivered the two introductory lectures of hiscourse in the Theatre of the College of Surgeons. Theirhighly interesting character has, on both occasions, attracteda crowded audience. The lectures take place on Tuesday,Thursday, and Saturday, at four P.M.MORTALITY OF THE METROPOLIS.—Deaths in the week ending

March 10th, 1047, or 122 less than the winter average. Mor-

tality from epidemics, 243, which is little above the average.Small-pox does not prevail much at present; measles is un-usually low. Scarlatina and hooping-cough show a decrease onthe previous weeks; and now the mortality from the formerdoes not much exceed the average. Deaths from hooping-cough, 69, which is more than the average by 27. Typhushas fallen to the average, namely, 42 deaths. Fatal cases ofdiarrhoea and dysentery, 21, being seven more than theaverage. Of cholera, only 15, though in the three precedingweeks they were 49, 40, and 35. Of the 15, two occurred inWarburton’s Lunatic Asylum, Bethnal-green; five in theWorkhouse of St. George-in-the-East. The mortality fromdiseases of the organs of circulation is also unusually low.Mean height of barometer, above 30 in. daily, except on Wed-nesday, Thursday, and Friday; the highest, which was onTuesday, was 30’385. Mean temperature of the week, 43°.On Sunday the thermometer rose to 60°. Wind mostly south-west, till Thursday, when it veered to north and north-west.Electricity manifested only on the 4th, when it was positive.

TO CORRESPONDENTS.A Constant Reader.-The party named is stated in the Medical

Directory" to be L.S.A. The indenture of apprenticeship would be heldvalid at the Hall alone.

M.D., M.R.C.S., c.-He cannot.To the Editor of THE LANCET.

SIR,—I should feel obliged if you or any of your numerous correspondentscan enlighten me as to any plan of treatment that may have been foundsuccessful in "incontinence of urine," occurring after the attainment ofpuberty.

Having under hand at present the direction of a case where a young man,aged eighteen, is subject (at intervals) to this affection, and not finding ityield to the ordinary treatment recommended, I conceived that through themedium of your valuable periodical I might obtain a knowledge of somesuccessful mode of treatment, or more particularly of some mechanical con-trivance which might be applied to the relief of this serious annoyance.

I remain, Sir, yours obediently,February, 1849. W. H. H.X. Y.-The year would be included in the five years required by law.

To the Editor of THE LANCET.SIR,—It occurred to me lately, that a less expensive solvent of gutta

percha might be found than chloroform, which was employed for that pur-pose by Dr. Simpson last spring, and on trial I find that pure coal tar naphthadissolves it very readily, forming a thick viscid solution, which might beadvantageously substituted for the solution of gun-cotton in sulphuricether, now very extensively employed here as an application to cuts, andmight in circumscribed wounds entirely supersede the use of sutures. I donot know if any solution of gutta percha is at present employed in the arts;its use in the manufacture of waterproof coverings is obvious, and thosecircumstances have induced me to bring it under your notice.

I am, Sir, your very obedient servant,Edinburgh, March, 1849. AN INQUIRER.

To the Editor of THE LANCET.SIR,—I have just received a pamphlet from a person who, for the honour

and respectability of my profession, I shall be extremely sorry to hear istruly one of its members. I have returned it unpaid, and I trust that everyhonest man in the profession will do the same, so that the dirty author maybe well pelted with his own filth. I am, Sir, your obedient servant,

A.VTI-QUACKBRY.To the Editor of THE LANCET.

SIR,—I should feel obliged if you would inform me, through the mediumof your valuable journal, what extra qualification a surgeon and apothecary

requires in order to enter the army. I am aware that the Army Board re-quires a longer attendance on some paiticular lectures. Will you ohligemeby specifying what it requires extra to the Apothecaries’ Hall and Collegeof Surgeons. Your obedient servant,

A STUDENT.Our correspondent should consult the "Students’ Number" of THE

LANCET, published always immediately before or at the opening of themedical session.THE report of Mr. Fife is already in type, and will be published in the

ensuing number of THE LANCET.To Me Editor of THE LANCET.

SIR,—In your last number, your correspondent, .. Dr. W. PhilpotBrookes," informs us that he obtained his degree of M.D. "after muchtrouble, and at a cost of nearly one hundred guineas" ! I would ask theDoctor how he makes up that sum ? for he is a graduate of St. Andrew’s,where the fee comes to exactly £25 3s. He was put to no extra expensein the shape of lectures &c., as his diploma from the London College ofSurgeons qualified him for examination, so I think he is in error in sayinghis degree cost him £105. Yours &c. M. D.The second paper on the Influence of Winds on the Human Constitution

will be inserted on an early occasion.To the Editor of THE LANCET.SIR,—It is currently rumoured, that the head of the Naval Medical De-

partment is about to retire from his arduous duties, and that the Admiraltyhave it in contemplation to remodel the department over which thepresentchief has presided for so many years. Should this tumour prove to becorrect, it will afford the medical officers of the navy an opportunity of tes-tifying their respect and regard for their chief ere he takes his final leave ofthem, to retire to that quietude so necessary at his advanced and advancingyears.Portsmouth, March 9, 1849.A Subseriber to THE LANCET from the First.-Yes.

To the Editor of THE LANCET.SIR,—Is there any probability of the Apprenticeship System being

abolished in the new Medical Bill, about to be laid before parliament nextmonth ? Does not an indenture premium of £ 50 require a £2 stamp? Anearly answer to these two questions will greatly oblige,

Your obedient servant,JuvENls.

Yes. The cost of the stamp depends on the amount of the premium.Mr. Lofthouse.-The price of Williams’s "Principles of Medicine" is 12s.,

of Kirkes’ 11 Handbook of Physiology" 78. 6d., and of Carpenter’s " HumanPhysiology" .6’!.

To the Editor of THE LANCET.SIR,—Some time past I have been giving the tincture of hyoscyamus to

patients immediately after labour, for the purpose of allaying pain and pro.curing rest. Now, I find the use of this medicine as a sedative to be at-tended with great success, particularly when given with an equal quantityof tincture of opium. Wishing to know if you would advise meto continueusing the same, and whether it is equally good, or preferable to the tinctureof opium alone, I hope you will oblige me by a reply, as soon as convenient,in your useful journal, I remain, your obedient servant,

AN EDINBURGH MEDICAL STUDENT ANDEdinburgh, March, 18t9. ADMIRER OF THE LANCET.

Really a student under Dr. Christison should not write to ask us thproperties of tincture of hyoscyamus.

THE letter of Dr. Edwards Crisp shall be inserted next week.To the Editor of THE LANCET.

SIR,—Can you answer the following question in the next number of THELANCET? I am a member of the Apothecaries’ Company, and likely to haveto prove a large bill against a patient in a court of law. Can I charge forjourneys and attendance, in addition to medicines ? the patient being at adiitance of two miles, sometimes, from my house, and at others, sevenmiles. Your answer to these questions in your next issue wilt oblige,March, 5, !849. AN OLD SUBSCRIBER.

Yes ; a reasonable charge.I A Studeijt may consult Blundell’s "Lectures on Midwifery," publishedin THE LANCET, vols. i. and ii , 1827-28.

Chirurgus.—It does not.To the Editor of Tag LANCBT.

SIR,-Will you have the kindness to inform me whether the followingline of conduct in one professional man towards another is in accordancewith your views of medical ethics? If any of my patients, during my tem-porary absence, sends in an emergency to my rival, he refuses to attend,unless my dismissal and his subsequent attendance are guaranteed. As theparty referred to reads THE LANCET, the opinion of its respected editor maymeet his eye and influence his future conduct as a member of a liberal andgentlemanly profession. I am, Sir, your very obedient servant,March 6, 1849. AN OLD CORRESPONDENT.Such conduct is in the highest degree wrong.ERRATUM.—In the last number of THE LANCET, p. 261, second column,

four lines from the bottom,for 11 should" read " would."Communications have been received from—Mr. Ridley, (Hereford;) A

Surgeon, R.N. ; A Student; Mr. Fife, (Newcastle;) Mr. Crookes; AnInquirer; A Country Surgeon; Anti-Quackery; Mr. Gay; An EdinburghMedical Student; Mr. Langston, (Pembridge;) M.D. ; Mr. Clarke, (Tynton,Devon;) Dr. Edwards; Mr. White Cooper; A Constant Reader; Mr. Brox-holme; Messrs. Whitfield and Smyth, (Tolleshuiit Darcy, Essex;) Mr.

Wake, (Kentish-town ;) Mr. Richardson, (Skirlaugb, near Hull;) NavyMedical Department; Mr. Love, (with card;) J. J. J. ; Dr. Mitchell, (Not-tingham;) S. Z., a Subscriber to THE LANCET from the First; Juvenis;Mr. J. Foote; Mr. Jackson Chirurgus; P. P. ; Mr. Warwick, (Clapham-road ;) H. H. H.; Professor SchSnbein, (Basle;) Mr. St. John W. Lucas;Dr. Pettigrew; Anti-Cliquism; D. S. E.; Mr. Bartlett, (Pewsey;) Mr. For,(Broughton, Hants;) Mr. Day, (Isleworth;) Mr. Dearsly, (Harrow-road;)Mr. Lofthouse, (Ripon;) Dr. Edwards Crisp.