Marketing Sakai – Partie Deux Developing and Sharing Case Studies Mike Zackrison – rSmart Lois Brooks – Stanford University July 3, 2008

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<ul><li><p>Marketing Sakai Partie DeuxDeveloping and Sharing Case StudiesMike Zackrison rSmart Lois Brooks Stanford UniversityJuly 3, 2008</p></li><li><p>IntroductionsMike ZackrisonVP of Marketing and Strategy, rSmartBackground:Lots of experience commercializing open source for Higher Education@ Campus Pipeline, uPortal, Luminis, SunGard HEOpen source turned into a proprietary product model@ UniconOpen source as a consulting project model@ rSmartOpen source as an open, packaged product model(my personal favorite!) </p></li><li><p>Introductions</p><p>Lois BrooksDirector, Academic Computing, Stanford UniversityFounding partner of the Sakai project, and board member, Sakai Foundation</p></li><li><p>AgendaThe marketing imperativeRecap of market research findingsStory telling through case studiesExample case studies available todayDeveloping a case study the Stanford storyCase study how toCall to actionQ &amp; A</p></li><li><p>Return on Investment</p></li><li><p>Market Research RecapResearch conducted by rSmart Sept. 07How great is the propensity to change CMS?Why are institutions selecting Sakai and/or participating in the community?What are the experiences with and perceptions of Sakai?How can rSmart best support institutions in their use of open source solutions?</p></li><li><p>Market Research Key FindingsAlmost 90% of research participants are considering some level of LMS changeSakai is very successful in the RU/VH Carnegie classification of institutions awareness outside this classification is much lower</p></li><li><p>Why Institutions Dont AdoptCurrently satisfied with what they haveAny change would disrupt faculty experienceToo risk adversePreconceived notions about what it involves They dont know about SakaiDont know how to buy SakaiGetting into the community can be difficultWe talk open source they want to talk solutions</p></li><li><p>How to Increase AdoptionImprove Product</p><p>. . .these institutions require a clear differentiation in the user experience that would drive support among faculty to make the change.</p><p>Make Sakai easier to install and try out </p></li><li><p>How to Increase AdoptionMarketing and Education</p><p>They also wish to see proof points for institutions that are successfully implementing, configuring and using Sakai without a major in-house development staff. </p></li><li><p>Why so successful among RU/VH?They compare notes and follow leadersViral nature of higher education marketing</p><p>Story telling is an important way for decision makers to get their information in HE</p></li><li><p>Marketing is story tellingWhich leads to conversationsWhich leads to inspirationWhich leads to a vibrant and growing community.</p></li><li><p>Case Studies Today Marist College</p></li><li><p>Case Studies KCC ePortfolio</p></li><li><p>Case Studies University of MichiganNEW!</p></li><li><p>Case Studies Stanford UniversityNEW!</p></li><li><p>Case Studies University of CambridgeComing Soon!</p></li><li><p>Developing the Stanford Case Study a closer look</p></li><li><p>Stanford and SakaiActive in the communityValue great teachingBuilt pedagogy into our design and requirements Photo: Julie Mai</p></li><li><p>Goals for the case studyShare our stories: inspire at home and in the communityTake the temperature locally (and remember why we got into this)Learn what matters, what to do next, what our faculty want</p></li><li><p>Language learning</p></li><li><p>Program in Writing and Rhetoric</p></li><li><p>Library engagement:</p><p> A customized entry into classes</p><p> Well chosen resources</p><p> Access to librarians</p></li><li><p>FeedbackInstructors wantMore ideas for how to use the toolsMore input on the toolsMore customizability and user delightPrompts from us about the course cycleCollaboration with colleagues from other universities </p></li><li><p>Tips for Developing your own Case Studies</p></li><li><p>A Guide for Developing a Case StudyProject aimDefine formatDetermine themeDefine key messagesDevelop contentIdentify key contributorsOther considerations</p></li><li><p>Key TipsCase studies are more powerful when they focus on a key theme. Avoid making one case study all things to all people.It is powerful to have the stories highlight use in different constituent groups. It is powerful to have one of the stories focus on a future need the institution anticipates and how the solution is expected to fill that need.</p></li><li><p>A Case Study TemplateIntroduction: School background and situation relative to eLearningWhat is the institutions size, type, strengths (including related achievements or awards)What existing or previous eLearning solutions / platforms were in useWhat key drivers lead to evaluating and/or embracing SakaiWhat quotations from key leaders can be captured related to the importance of Sakai and its alignment with institutions vision</p></li><li><p>A Case Study TemplateCase Study Body: Identify 2-3 stories of how Sakai is being used. For each story answer:What were the drivers behind using Sakai?What key goals are being targeted or achieved by using Sakai?What results have been achieved?What unique uses or benefits of Sakai have been realized that were not originally anticipated?</p></li><li><p>A Case Study TemplateClosing: Looking forwardSummary or Sakai benefits and impact to the institutionLessons learnedNext steps with Sakai on campusVision of Sakai moving forward</p></li><li><p>Topic IdeasSuccesses using Sakai for:CoursesGroup collaborationResearchAdministrationProcess for deciding on SakaiPilot program examplesResource requirements / profilesMany others</p></li><li><p>Call to ActionWe have great stories to tellIts up to us to share themContact us for ideas on how to get started</p></li><li><p>Q &amp; A and ContactMike Zackrison mikez@rsmart.comLois Brooks lbrooks@stanford.edu </p></li><li><p>ReferencesOpen Source Learning Management Systems Market Research, Thanos Partners, September 2007, commissioned by The rSmart Group. For a copy of this report please contact Mike Zackrison: mikez@rsmart.com</p><p>The research was conducted in August 2007 through a series of focus groupsand one-on-one interviews. Focus group and interview protocols were definedbased on the following segmentation of participants: current rSmart Sakai CLEcustomers, Sakai community leaders, and technology decision makers notutilizing the Sakai or rSmart Sakai CLE. Fifty-two technology decision makersrepresenting thirty-five institutions and organizations participated.Participants in the study represent a diverse cross-section of colleges anduniversities and organizations that serve institutions of higher learning. Three ofthe institutions are non-US based colleges and universities. US-basedinstitutions represent the spectrum of Carnegie classifications with significantdifferences in sizes, regions, and settings. Participating institutions also representa balance of public and private funding. </p><p>It should be noted that neither the intent of nor the methodology for the researchwas to create a standardized basis for comparison across all participatinginstitutions. Instead, the intent was to delve into the unique perspectives of eachcategory of participants and compile the consensus, complimentary anddivergent views across the groups.Fortunately this issue is on the communitys radar at this point. </p><p>rSmart has an easy to install version of Sakai. . . feel free to use ours. Project AimWhat are you working to accomplish with the case study?Who is the target audience?What are the perspectives and concerns of the target audience on this topic area?Define FormatWhat is the format of the case study? (written, poster, webinar, presentation)What is the length of the case study?Where and how will the case study be communicated?Focus AreaWhat is the theme of the case study? How does the theme support the project aim?What is the key issue or problem you are addressing?Case studies are more powerful when the story focuses on a key theme. Avoid the desire to make one case study all things to all people. Instead, develop different case studies for different areas of focus.Key messagesWhat are the two or three key messages to convey about the product and/or solution in the case study?These messages should be Applicable to other colleges and universitiesAddress widely held needsBe broader than the institutionDo the messages directly address the target audiences concerns and issues? Do the messages align with the focus areas of the case study?Define ContentWhat are the two to three stories or illustrations that best support the key messages?These stories should includeContext about the user and its needsThe drivers behind the projectThe approach used by the userThe results achieved, with a focus on tangible benefits and results where possibleIt is powerful to have the stories highlight use in different constituent groups. It is powerful to have one of the stories focus on a future need the institution anticipates and how the solution is expected to fill that need. Key ContributorsWho are the contributors that can speak most powerfully to the content? Considerations should include The persons role (a role of credibility with the target audience and/or a role seen as central to the project or process are critical)The persons ability to speak powerfully about the approach and resultThe persons relationship to the results achievedOther Content ConsiderationsIs there a high-level executive that can speak to how the product and/or solution aligns with the organizations mission or vision?Are there achievements or awards the organization received related to this product or service or this area of capability?Are there key data, lessons learned, quotations, or vivid examples that can be pulled out to engage readers to want to know more?Project AimWhat are you working to accomplish with the case study?Who is the target audience?What are the perspectives and concerns of the target audience on this topic area?Define FormatWhat is the format of the case study? (written, poster, webinar, presentation)What is the length of the case study?Where and how will the case study be communicated?Focus AreaWhat is the theme of the case study? How does the theme support the project aim?What is the key issue or problem you are addressing?Case studies are more powerful when the story focuses on a key theme. Avoid the desire to make one case study all things to all people. Instead, develop different case studies for different areas of focus.Key messagesWhat are the two or three key messages to convey about the product and/or solution in the case study?These messages should be Applicable to other colleges and universitiesAddress widely held needsBe broader than the institutionDo the messages directly address the target audiences concerns and issues? Do the messages align with the focus areas of the case study?Define ContentWhat are the two to three stories or illustrations that best support the key messages?These stories should includeContext about the user and its needsThe drivers behind the projectThe approach used by the userThe results achieved, with a focus on tangible benefits and results where possibleIt is powerful to have the stories highlight use in different constituent groups. It is powerful to have one of the stories focus on a future need the institution anticipates and how the solution is expected to fill that need. Key ContributorsWho are the contributors that can speak most powerfully to the content? Considerations should include The persons role (a role of credibility with the target audience and/or a role seen as central to the project or process are critical)The persons ability to speak powerfully about the approach and resultThe persons relationship to the results achievedOther Content ConsiderationsIs there a high-level executive that can speak to how the product and/or solution aligns with the organizations mission or vision?Are there achievements or awards the organization received related to this product or service or this area of capability?Are there key data, lessons learned, quotations, or vivid examples that can be pulled out to engage readers to want to know more?</p></li></ul>