MAKING SENSE OF LITERACY RTI IN THE SENSE OF LITERACY RTI IN THE CLASSROOM ... sets the direction for teaching and learning in English-medium ... strengths and weaknesses; decoding ability;

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  • M A K I N G S E N S E O F L I T E R A C Y R T I I N T H E C L A S S R O O M

    A W O R L D LY J O U R N E Y: L I T E R A C Y I N T E R V E N T I O N A R O U N D T H E G L O B E

    KATE RAFFILE, M.ED, CAGS FULBRIGHT DISTINGUISHED AWARD IN TEACHING

    HTTP://KATERAFFILENEWZEALAND.BLOGSPOT.COM KATERAFFILE@GMAIL.COM

    http://KATERAFFILEBLOGSPOT.COMmailto:KATERAFFILE@GMAIL.COM

  • Beverly Randell on Teaching Reading

  • T O D AY S L E A R N I N G PAT H /W A LT

    NZ Educational History

    General NZ Schools Today

    Fundamental Differences

    New Zealand Results

    Urgency of Creating a Literate Society

    Changes to our practice

    1. collaboration

    2. assessment

    3. goal setting

    4. differentiation

    5. utilizing resources

    6. strategies

  • N E W Z E A L A N D E D U C AT I O N A L S Y S T E M H I S T O R Y Education Act 1877

    Multi-age schools- 1-2 teachers, in 1 or 2 classrooms 78% (1877); 81% (1927); 65% (1947)

    1936-Abolition of proficiency exam, primary teachers could explore subjects in depth, more self-directed project based learning, teachers tailored to childs individual abilities and needs.

    By the 1960s urban and rural primary schools had the same curriculum. Country teachers had become skilled at teaching different ages and levels in one classroom.Classes were informal, with all children taking part of some activities. At other times, some received the teachers attention, while others practiced writing or read silently.(retrieved: www.teara.govt.nz/en/country-schooling/print on 3/4/2015)

    1966-Schools broken into primary and secondary. Teachers were still teaching a range of students. 1 teacher for primary (NE-year 6); secondary (year 7 to 12)

    http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/video/16513/country-teacher-at-work

    http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/country-schooling/printhttp://www.teara.govt.nz/en/video/16513/country-teacher-at-work

  • H I S T O R Y O F T E A C H I N G R E A D I N G I N N Z

    1958 NZ Govt provided reading materials- Janet & John

    1961-1962 Produced own series: Ready to Read

    1963- Disseminated Ready to Read and provided PD (18 books, 12 little books, 6 regular size, leveled by color, moved up in gradient); Later Years- PM/Beverly Randell to join as supplemental texts, Joy Cowley, etc

    Development of Reading Recovery - 1970s

  • N E C E S S I T Y O F D I F F E R E N T I AT E D G R O U P I N G : PA R T O F T H E H I S T O R Y

    Especially in baby-boomer generation- classes as big as 40-50. Children broken into groups of 8-10 @ same level of achievement.

    Sample literacy block (1949-1963, Interview with Beverly Randell, 2015) 9:00-9:45 Purposeful Play 9:50-10:30 Word Study 10:30-10:45 Playtime 10:45-12:00 Blackboard Reading/ Small Group (6 groups, 12 mins each), others independently working 2:30-3:00 Book Reading/Small Groups (10 minutes each) 3:00 Take book home

  • S C H O O L S T O D AY

    Most schools have less than 120 students

    Schools receive funding based on decile level- schools must fundraise

    Special Education Process- Lack of Resources, Parent Funding

    MOE provide resources: Ready to Read, School Journals, Educator Textbooks (Effective Literacy Practices)

    National Standards & Curriculum

    No national assessment

  • J U S T S O M E T H I N G S T O P O N D E RF U N D A M E N TA L D I F F E R E N C E S

  • P O W E R F U L Q U O T E S F R O M T H E N Z N AT I O N A L C U R R I C U L U M Purpose: Young people become confident, connected, actively involved, lifelong learners

    High Expectations: The curriculum supports and empowers all students to learn and achieve personal excellence, regardless of their individual circumstances.

    Autonomy:

    The New Zealand Curriculum sets the direction for teaching and learning in English-medium New Zealand schools. But it is the framework rather than a detailed plan. This means that while every school curriculum must be clearly aligned with the intent of this document, schools have considerable flexibility when determining the detail.

    The design of each schools curriculum should allow teachers the scope to make interpretations in response to particular needs, interests, talents of individuals and groups of students in their classes.

    Learning Environment: Students are to feel accepted, enjoy positive relationships with fellow students and teachers, know what and why they are learning and how the content will be used in their lives. Teachers are encouraged to find opportunities for students to make decisions about their learning. Learning communities are such that everyone, including the teacher are encouraged, challenged, supported, and given feedback.

    Assessment: Promotes- On-going, in-the-moment assessment to inform teaching; asks teachers to be inquirers, establish baselines to create direction in teaching; requires that teachers know their students and deliberately build on what their students know and have experienced, so they can maximize learning time, anticipate students learning needs, and avoid unnecessary duplication of content. Each school decides on their own assessment procedures and tools.

    The New Zealand Curriculum, together with Qualifications Framework, gives schools the flexibility to design and deliver programs that will engage all students and offer them appropriate learning pathways. The flexibility of the qualifications system also allows schools to keep assessment to levels that are manageable and reasonable for both students and teachers. Not all aspects of the curriculum need to be formally assessed, and excessive high-stakes assessment in years 11-13 it to be avoided.

  • New Entrants

    - Students enter on 5th birthday

    -Students stay in NE class for (usually) 3 terms, or until they are ready to move on

    -Fluidity between NE and Year 1

    -Multi-age/level groupings NE, Year 1, Year 2

    -Allows for smaller groupings throughout the year during 1st year of school

  • S O W H AT ? R E A D I N G R E S U LT S

    85% students meeting/exceeding NZ National Standards (based on observations / site visits/ERO Reports)

    Latest PISA Results (Program for International Assessment, 2012):

    88-98% NZ students reading at level 5+(one of the highest percentage of students reading at level 6)

    PISA RESULTS

    New Zealand

    OECD Avg.

    USA

    Reading Proficiency 512 496 498

  • High Early Reading Expectations

    New Entrant Process= Individualized Support

    NZ YEAR OF SCHOOL

    USA GRADE

    EOY NZ READING LEVEL

    EXPECTATION

    EOY ORR READING

    LEVEL EXPECTATION

    NE ENTRANT K 11 4

  • Urgency in Teaching Those Hardest-to-Teach

  • If early literacy skills are not acquired by age 7, everychildachancetrst.org

    http://everychildachancetrst.org

  • Return on Investment

  • What to do? Steps to Effectively and Efficiently Intervening

    collaborate assess set purpose for student learning/expectations differentiate utilize resources Additional Strategies

  • H E W A K A E K E N O A W E A R E A L L I N T H I S T O G E T H E R M A O R I P R O V E R B

    COLLABORATION

  • D E F I N I N G E L E M E N T S O F C O L L A B O R AT I O N MUTUAL UNDERSTANDING

    SHARED RESPONSIBILITY

    SHARED VISION

    RELATIONAL TRUST (Willingness to be vulnerable b/c one has confidence that others will play their part. Not to be mistaken for warmth and affection).

    MUTUAL RESPECT

    COMMON LEARNING-Dont pretend to have all the answers (open learning conversations= OLC)

  • A L O N E W E C A N D O S O L I T T L E , T O G E T H E R W E C A N D O S O M U C H - H E L E N K E L L E R

    IN THE CONTEXT OF A SCHOOL, GAINING SIGNIFICANT SHIFTS IN STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AND WELL-BEING REQUIRES THE COLLECTIVE EFFORTS OF MANY TEACHERS( ROBINSON, ET AL 2009)

    AUCKLAND STUDY: STUDENT READING LEVELS WITH PROFESSIONAL DISCUSSIONS

    CHICAGO SCHOOLS- 200 SCHOOLS, TRUST=IMPROVEMENT IN MATH AND READING SCORES

    OPEN LEARNING CONVERSATIONS, TRUSTING RELATIONSHIPS- ALLOWS NON-JUDGMENTAL PROBLEM-SOLVING

    MODEL FOR STUDENTS

    PROMOTING A SUPPORTIVE ENVIRONMENT AND ENCOURAGING THE DEVELOPMENTAL OF POSITIVE COLLEGIAL RELATIONSHIPS NOT ONLY AFFECTS STAFF AND QUALITY OF WORK LIFE, BUT IS LIKELY TO HAVE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS, THEIR LEARNING, AND THE COMMUNITY AS WELL.

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  • H O W T O A C H I E V E P O S I T I V E C O L L A B O R AT I O N protected time

    commitment to work together as true professional colleagues

    set goals that are clear and appropriate for student learning- focused discussions that are solution minded

    collective responsibility and accountability for student achievement and well-being, US Study: Schools with a high level of collective responsibility for learning are those where students learn more in all subjects

    evidence based discussions (student portfolios)

    action research projects

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