Lindsey catalog

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Text of Lindsey catalog

  • LINDSEY NOBEL

  • My objective as an artist is to represent all aspects of human interaction, from neurology to sociality, in our contemporary society. My study goes from the micro environment of neuro-nals synaptic junctions to the macro expanding of urban cities and digital networks. Since 1996 to 2013 I have been expressing the results of my studies by utilizing different tech-niques from painting to sculpture, mixed media and photography. For my paintings I utilize oil, acrylic, ink, coffee, pen. The materials are canvas, masonite, wood panels. Drawing mainly on paper and canvas. The sculptures are made in plastic, bronze, silver. For my art I have de-veloped a drawing language based on the otherwise invisible connections between humans and machines, effectively manifesting the immense grid of energy that now exists between human, machine, and spiritual consciousness. Humans found, or perhaps even invented, that consciousness, and we are now mapping it with our newest technologies, technolo-gies that weave us together and make the universe that much smaller small enough to fit onto a painting or even a sheet of paper. I express this otherwise invisible language through mark-making, drawn and painted and even photographed and sculpted. Dots, lines, pods, licks of fire and drops of water transform into networks that I describe as neurons because they resemble the human nervous system. In fact, they suggest that all of reality has a ner-vous system, and our reality constitutes its synapses, is the case of the Neuron Paintings Existing drawings converted into sculptures made of plastic that represents neurons then photographed. Its this idea of a neuron trapped in time. An abstract idea that only you re-member. The resin acts as a reflection of yourself and you become one with the piece. A true mixed media. An overlapping of sculpture, painting, photography and drawing all in one. Another technique has been used for the Ejection Series by using ejections of paint through a 50cc syringe. It represents just going for it, leap of faith. You have one shot. In the case of the Photography Straight Up Photography. Idea of emotions and how temporary a feeling can be. We take on whatever it is at that moment. Our mind functions on so many emotions. The white sculpture represents us and the liquid is the idea of a temporary state or thought or place in time. Objects, smells, taste, visuals, all remind of us of something in our lives. These photos represent a specific moment that eventually becomes nostalgia to you. The most recent Liquid Line Series Breaking away from traditional painting methods ie. Brushes, fingers, pens, pastels. Based on human interaction and the idea of being invisibly connect-ed with everyone on the planet. We have the ability to always be connected via technology, thoughts, and actions. The assembling of different techniques, represents an evolution from a single media, to a more integrated use of techniques, gives me the opportunity to repre-sent my work from different perspectives.

    Lindsey Nobel

    Cover Page: Page 1:

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    Ghosts of Hotel Chelsea, 2001-2003, Acrylic & Ink on Canvas, 28 x 52

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    Untitled, Neuron Drawing Ink on Black Paper, 12 x 18

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    Aura, Pen & Watercolor, 10 1/2 x 14

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    Aura, Pen & Watercolor, 10 1/2 x 14

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    Untitiled, 2008, White Ink on Canvas, 14 x 18

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    Untitled, 2008, Watercolor & Ink on Watercolor Board, 24 x 36

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    Untitled, 2002, Blue Pigment on Watercolor Paper, 8 x 10

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    Red Line, 2011, Watercolor & Ink, 10 x 14

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    Untitiled, 2008, White Ink on Canvas, 14 x 18

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    Untitled, 2008, Watercolor on Paper, 18 x 24

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  • String Theory #3 Hotel Chelsea, 2014, Acrylic on Canvas, 30 x 40

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    Mom, Neuron Mixed Medium on Wood Panel, 48 x 48

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    Neuron, 2002, Mixed Medium on Wood Panel, 2002, 36 X 36

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    Neuron, Mixed Media on Wood Panel, 14 x 14

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    Injection/Ejaculation/Eruption Series, 2004, Acrylic on Canvas, 60 x 36

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    Untitled, 2000, Photography Shot with 4 x 5 film

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    Untitled, 2000, Photography Shot with 4 x 5 film

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    Untitled, 2000, Photography Shot with 4 x 5 film

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    Liquidline, 2015, Acrylic on Canvas, 24 x 24

    Liquidline, 2015, Acrylic on Canvas, 24 x 24

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    Liquidline, 2014, Acrylic on Canvas, 48 x 48

    Liquidline #5, 2012, Acrylic on Canvas, 36 x 36

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    Liquidline Acrylic, 2012, 36 x 48

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    Injection/Ejaculation/Eruption Series, 2004, Acrylic on Canvas, 60 x 36

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    Syringe, 2012, Ink on Canvas, 24 x 24

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    Syringe, 2012, Ink on Canvas, 30 x 30

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    Connect Grid, 2013, Acrylic & Ink on Canvas, 24 x 24

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    String Theory, 2013, Spray Paint & Strings, 20 x 20 x 20 x 20 x 20

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    no info

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    Liquidline Trapped Landscape, 2014, Acrylic on Canvas, 60 x 60

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    Veil Painting, 2015, Poured Oil on Raw Canvas, 69 x 60 1/2

    Page 31-32: Veil Painting, 2015, Poured Oil on Raw Canvas, 74 x 60

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    Veil Painting, 2015, Poured Oil on Raw Canvas, 60 x 50 1/2

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    Veil Painting, 2015, Poured Oil on Raw Canvas, 64 x 41

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    Hey Hey Hey, 2015, Acrylic & Spray Paint Over Hay, 18 x 24

    Hey Hey Hey, 2015, Acrylic & Spray Paint Over Hay, 35 x 24

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    Hey Hey Hey, 2015, Acrylic & Spray Paint Over Hay, 24 x 18

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    Hey Hey Hey, 2015, Acrylic & Spray Paint Over Hay, 71 x 52

  • Claude Monet had a sharp response when somebody described a painting he had made of the ocean as a seascape.

    Its not a seascape, he said. Its a time of day.

    He wasnt just being persnickety. Until the early 19th century artists wishing to paint naturebwould make preliminary studies out-of-doors but made their work in their studios because there was no practical way of carrying pigments outside. One early attempt to resolve this problem involved put-ting pre-mixed paint into pigs bladders while another used glass syringes, with the paint being squeezed out by a plunger. Then an American portrait artist John Goffe Rand invented the squeez-able metal tube in 1841. A Brit firm, Winsor & Newton, marketed the tubes. Impressionism was wait-ing to happen and was so named after an unflattering review of a Monet canvas insatirical mag, Le Charivari. Indeed he was deeply serious about it and in the early 80s took to leaving several canvases out-of-doors so that he could work on each at the same time, day after day, so as to catch the effects of the light just so.

    Lindsey Nobel also harnesses technology and nature. She has done so indeed since she had been a rotoscoper for the film Jurassic Park at ILM in San Francisco. The intricate networking of coral reefs impressed her deeply, as both a metaphoric and actual representation of the expanding culture of the Internet. Hence her powerful last suite of work, The Neuron Paintings, which Nobel competed in her studio in Englewood, Los Angeles. This current work is about (her phrase) supporting nature with technology and she began in a back garden on New Yorks Upper East Side. I watched her prepare to make a three-foot by four-foot canvas, using a quick drying silver acrylic. The can read: DANGER! EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE. CONTENTS UNDER PRESSURE. VAPOR HARMFUL! Hence the back garden. In a studio the turpentine alone would kill you, she said.

    She lay down the canvas on the mown lawn, saying, I think nature is completely on the run. She strewed the canvas with handfuls of hay from a pet store, put on a mask, and slathered the area with the acrylic. Yes, Pollock comes to mind but so does street art. Englewood is all about tagging, she said, breezily. The acrylic works its way through. Its a quick-dryer and Nobel is a swift-mover. Shortly, she holds up a silvery canvas. It was purposefully accidental, an apparition, but a solid presence and completely there..and done.

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