of 2 /2
1233 - disease as based on a classification of the normal absolute, the absolute, and the relative absolute of solids and urea." This proposition is somewhat involved and although Dr. Memminger makes praiseworthy efforts to render his meaning .clear we do not think that he succeeds in so doing. His - definition of "chronic Bright’s disease" is a bad one, for be says: "I include, then, under and in this category the large white kidney, the small granular kidney, the -small granular and fatty kidney, and finally the amyloid or waxy kidney." The pathology of these conditions is so ’diverse that to attempt to place them all under one head for - clinical purposes is absurd, although the author maintains that interstitial nephritis "is frequently a natural con- sequence of the chronic secondary parenchymatous variety." The whole tone of the book illustrates the many errors which may arise from looking at disease through a test-tube rather than by studying it at the bedside. Der Kolpeurynter seine Geschichte und Annendung in der Gebitrtshiilfe. (The Colpeurynter : its Hi.story and -Employ- ment in Midnifery.) By Dr. RUDOLF BIERMER. With Eight Illustrations in the text. Wiesbaden : J. F. Bergmann. 1899. Pp. 69. Price 2s. 6d. THIS work contains an account of the author’s experience with the Colpeurynter in 23 -cases at the Frauenklinik at Bonn and the conclusions he has arrived at as to its advantages and disadvantages. After a historical sketch of the development of the instru- ment Dr. Biermer proceeds to consider the special indica- tions for its use. Amongst these the most important is the induction of premature labour in cases of contracted pelves. The author, however, still regards Krause’s method as the best and resorts to the use of a hydrostatic bag only when the bougie takes too long to initiate pains or when it is aecessary to terminate the labour rapidly. With this view we entirely agree, as in large numbers of cases the bougie candoubtedly gives the best results as regards the children. If the cervical canal is sufficiently patulous the practice at Bonn is to place the hydrostatic bag in the uterine cavity, otherwise it is placed in the vagina. It is a matter of indifference what particular kind of bag is "employed, but Champetier de Ribes’s or one like it is the best, and after its introduction into the uterus slight intermittent or constant traction can be exerted upon it until it is ’, expelled. In 16 cases of the induction of premature labour 12 children were born alive, of whom 11 left the hospital alive; all the mothers made a good recovery and 12 passed through a puerperium free from fever. Dr. Biermer has also employed a hydrostatic bag in two .cases of acute nephritis, but in eclampsia he would restrict its use until after the employment of all other available means of treatment. In two cases of pneumonia the use of the bag rapidly terminated labour, but one of the mothers and the child were lost as the result of rupture of the uterus occurring during extraction. This unfortunate result was in no way due to the employment of the bag. In a bad - case of accidental hsemorrhage the introduction of a hydro- static dilator into the vagina was followed by the onset of vigorous pains, the prompt arrest of the bleeding, and the birth of a living child. The author has not used the bag in any case of placenta prsevia, but would do so and thinks that its employment holds out a prospect of good results. His final conclusions are that the colpeurynter used in the vagina or in the uterus with or without constant traction is a very efficient and safe method of producing rapid dilatation of the cervix and marked contractions of the uterus. The most important indication for its use is the induction of premature labour in contracted pelves, but it should also be employed in any case where grave danger to the life of the mother calls for a rapid termination of labour. The hydro- static dilator is an instrument which can be used not only in lying-in institutions, but also by the general practitioner and should form a part of every obstetric outfit. LIBRARY TABLE. The Natural Waters of Harrogate. By FRANCIS WILLIAM SMITH, M.D. Aberd. London: Dawbarn and Ward. 1899. 8vo, pp. 101. Price Is.—Harrogate is so much visited by, and so useful to, invalids and those temporarily out of health that it is not surprising to find new medical works fairly frequently appearing on the much-discussed but important theme of the action and therapeutic uses of its various mineral waters. Dr. F. W. Smith’s book likewise contains meteorological notes and remarks on the climate and sanitary arrangements of the Spa with a new analysis by Mr. Charles F. Townsend of the six wells mostly in use for medicinal purposes. According to the new analysis the "old sulphur well" con- tains 16 cubic inches of sulphuretted hydrogen in the gallon (Thorpe’s analysis in 1875 gave only 10’16 cubic inches) and the strong Montpellier sulphur water, which according to Attfield’s analysis contains none of this gas, is found by Mr. Townsend to contain 11’5 cubic inches. Short notes on the chief affections treated at Harrogate are given and there is an account of the superheated air methods for rheumatoid arthritis, gouty conditions, &c. Atlas der Haut-Krankheiten, mit e’inem Grecndriss der Pathulogie und Therapie derselben. (Atlas of Diseases of the Skin, with Outlines of thei’/’ Pathology and Tlaerape2ctics). Von Professor Dr. FRANZ MRACEK in Wien. With 63 Coloured Plates and 39 Uncoloured Illustrations. Munchen : J. F. Lehmann. 1899. Price 14 marks.-We have on several occasions expressed our appreciation of the excellent series of "Hand Atlases" published by J. F. Lehmann. This volume maintains the excellence of its predecessors. The coloured plates are true to nature and most beautifully I executed. The illustrations of the various forms of erythema, for example (erythema multiforme, erythema bullosum, erythema contusiforme et papulatum), show extremely well the usual appearances of these conditions and will enable the student to refresh his memory after not having seen them for some time, or the whole matter will form a most valuable work to refer to should he meet with any condition of the skin with which he is unacquainted. The description of the various diseases is also good. Doubtless an English translation will shortly appear and so render it more convenient for those English readers who are not sufficiently acquainted with the German language to enable them to read the original work with advantage. Revue de Gynécologie et de Chirurgie Abdominale. March, April. 1899. Paris : Masson et Cie. - This number con- tains the following original articles :-1. 50 cases of Marriages concluded between Persons of the same Sex, by M. Fr. Neugebauer. 2. Hypertrophy of the Anterior Tubercle of the Vagina simulating Hermaphroditism, by M. de Sinety. 3. Primary Epithelioma of the Fallopian Tube, by M. H. Duret. 4. Severe Forms’of Moveable Kidney and its Treatment by Nephropexy, by M. P. Bazy. 5. An Ana- tomical Study of the Appendix and the Ileo-csecal Region, by MM. Tuffier and Jeanne. 6. On Entero-rectal Anasto- mosis, by M. Henri Lardennois. The usual analysis of current literature concludes the number. Annales de Gynécologie et d’ Obstetriq2ce. April, 1899. Paris: Steinheil.-This number contains the following articles. 1. Retention of Urine as the Result of Constipa- tion due to Pregnancy, by Professor Alphonse Herrgott. 2. Cassarean Section necessitated by an Intraligamentous Dermoid Cyst, by Professor Herrgott. 3. Radiography of £

LIBRARY TABLE

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1233

- disease as based on a classification of the normal absolute,the absolute, and the relative absolute of solids and urea." This proposition is somewhat involved and although Dr.Memminger makes praiseworthy efforts to render his meaning.clear we do not think that he succeeds in so doing. His- definition of "chronic Bright’s disease" is a bad one, forbe says: "I include, then, under and in this categorythe large white kidney, the small granular kidney, the-small granular and fatty kidney, and finally the amyloid orwaxy kidney." The pathology of these conditions is so’diverse that to attempt to place them all under one head for- clinical purposes is absurd, although the author maintainsthat interstitial nephritis "is frequently a natural con-

sequence of the chronic secondary parenchymatous variety."The whole tone of the book illustrates the many errors

which may arise from looking at disease through a test-tuberather than by studying it at the bedside.

Der Kolpeurynter seine Geschichte und Annendung in der

Gebitrtshiilfe. (The Colpeurynter : its Hi.story and -Employ-ment in Midnifery.) By Dr. RUDOLF BIERMER. WithEight Illustrations in the text. Wiesbaden : J. F.

Bergmann. 1899. Pp. 69. Price 2s. 6d.

THIS work contains an account of the author’s experiencewith the Colpeurynter in 23 -cases at the Frauenklinik at

Bonn and the conclusions he has arrived at as to its

advantages and disadvantages.After a historical sketch of the development of the instru-

ment Dr. Biermer proceeds to consider the special indica-tions for its use. Amongst these the most important is theinduction of premature labour in cases of contracted pelves.The author, however, still regards Krause’s method as thebest and resorts to the use of a hydrostatic bag only whenthe bougie takes too long to initiate pains or when it is

aecessary to terminate the labour rapidly. With this viewwe entirely agree, as in large numbers of cases the bougiecandoubtedly gives the best results as regards the

children. If the cervical canal is sufficiently patulousthe practice at Bonn is to place the hydrostatic bagin the uterine cavity, otherwise it is placed in the vagina.It is a matter of indifference what particular kind of bag is"employed, but Champetier de Ribes’s or one like it is the best,and after its introduction into the uterus slight intermittentor constant traction can be exerted upon it until it is ’,expelled.

In 16 cases of the induction of premature labour 12children were born alive, of whom 11 left the hospital alive;all the mothers made a good recovery and 12 passed througha puerperium free from fever.

Dr. Biermer has also employed a hydrostatic bag in two.cases of acute nephritis, but in eclampsia he would restrictits use until after the employment of all other available

means of treatment. In two cases of pneumonia the use ofthe bag rapidly terminated labour, but one of the mothersand the child were lost as the result of rupture of the uterusoccurring during extraction. This unfortunate result wasin no way due to the employment of the bag. In a bad- case of accidental hsemorrhage the introduction of a hydro-static dilator into the vagina was followed by the onset ofvigorous pains, the prompt arrest of the bleeding, and thebirth of a living child. The author has not used the bagin any case of placenta prsevia, but would do so and thinksthat its employment holds out a prospect of good results.

His final conclusions are that the colpeurynter used in thevagina or in the uterus with or without constant traction is avery efficient and safe method of producing rapid dilatationof the cervix and marked contractions of the uterus. Themost important indication for its use is the induction of

premature labour in contracted pelves, but it should also beemployed in any case where grave danger to the life of the

mother calls for a rapid termination of labour. The hydro-static dilator is an instrument which can be used not onlyin lying-in institutions, but also by the general practitionerand should form a part of every obstetric outfit.

LIBRARY TABLE.

The Natural Waters of Harrogate. By FRANCIS WILLIAMSMITH, M.D. Aberd. London: Dawbarn and Ward. 1899. 8vo,pp. 101. Price Is.—Harrogate is so much visited by, and souseful to, invalids and those temporarily out of health that itis not surprising to find new medical works fairly frequentlyappearing on the much-discussed but important theme of theaction and therapeutic uses of its various mineral waters.Dr. F. W. Smith’s book likewise contains meteorologicalnotes and remarks on the climate and sanitary arrangementsof the Spa with a new analysis by Mr. Charles F. Townsendof the six wells mostly in use for medicinal purposes.According to the new analysis the "old sulphur well" con-tains 16 cubic inches of sulphuretted hydrogen in the gallon(Thorpe’s analysis in 1875 gave only 10’16 cubic inches) andthe strong Montpellier sulphur water, which according toAttfield’s analysis contains none of this gas, is found by Mr.Townsend to contain 11’5 cubic inches. Short notes on thechief affections treated at Harrogate are given and there isan account of the superheated air methods for rheumatoidarthritis, gouty conditions, &c.

Atlas der Haut-Krankheiten, mit e’inem Grecndriss der

Pathulogie und Therapie derselben. (Atlas of Diseases of theSkin, with Outlines of thei’/’ Pathology and Tlaerape2ctics).Von Professor Dr. FRANZ MRACEK in Wien. With 63Coloured Plates and 39 Uncoloured Illustrations. Munchen :J. F. Lehmann. 1899. Price 14 marks.-We have on

several occasions expressed our appreciation of the excellentseries of "Hand Atlases" published by J. F. Lehmann.This volume maintains the excellence of its predecessors.The coloured plates are true to nature and most beautifully

I executed. The illustrations of the various forms of

erythema, for example (erythema multiforme, erythemabullosum, erythema contusiforme et papulatum), show

extremely well the usual appearances of these conditionsand will enable the student to refresh his memory afternot having seen them for some time, or the whole

matter will form a most valuable work to refer to shouldhe meet with any condition of the skin with which he is

unacquainted. The description of the various diseases isalso good. Doubtless an English translation will shortlyappear and so render it more convenient for those Englishreaders who are not sufficiently acquainted with the Germanlanguage to enable them to read the original work withadvantage.Revue de Gynécologie et de Chirurgie Abdominale. March,

April. 1899. Paris : Masson et Cie. - This number con-tains the following original articles :-1. 50 cases of

Marriages concluded between Persons of the same Sex, byM. Fr. Neugebauer. 2. Hypertrophy of the Anterior Tubercleof the Vagina simulating Hermaphroditism, by M. de

Sinety. 3. Primary Epithelioma of the Fallopian Tube, byM. H. Duret. 4. Severe Forms’of Moveable Kidney and itsTreatment by Nephropexy, by M. P. Bazy. 5. An Ana-tomical Study of the Appendix and the Ileo-csecal Region,by MM. Tuffier and Jeanne. 6. On Entero-rectal Anasto-

mosis, by M. Henri Lardennois. The usual analysis ofcurrent literature concludes the number.

Annales de Gynécologie et d’ Obstetriq2ce. April, 1899.Paris: Steinheil.-This number contains the followingarticles. 1. Retention of Urine as the Result of Constipa-tion due to Pregnancy, by Professor Alphonse Herrgott. 2.

Cassarean Section necessitated by an IntraligamentousDermoid Cyst, by Professor Herrgott. 3. Radiography of £

1234

the Pregnant Uterus, by Professor Varnier. 4. SomeRemarks on Three Cases of Total Abdominal Hysterectomy,by Professor Hartmann. 5. Bacteriological Researches onsome Cases of Retention of the Placenta and Suppuration ofthe Genital Tract, by J. Halle. The usual tri-monthly biblio-graphy concludes the number.

Analytical RecordsFROM

THE LANCET LABORATORY.

NEW TABLOIDS.

(BURROUGHS, WELLCOME, AND CO., SNOW HILL BUILDINQS, E.C.)SOME recent additions to the list of tabloids are worthy

of note. As an aid to the diagnosis of corneal lesionsfluorescein has recently come to the front, inasmuch thatwhile the normal cornea is not stained by a solution of thissubstance ulcers or parts free from epithelium become greenand remain so for a few hours. Further, fluorescein is solublein the lacrymal secretion and is free from irritating proper-ties. Fluorescein is a brilliant green fluorescent substancewhen in solution, and for the diagnostic purposes justmentioned nothing could be more convenient than thetabloid which is issued of a strength of :f’r/oo grain.Tabloids of krameria and cocaine contain an admittedlyuseful combination in the treatment of sore throat andirritable conditions of the pharynx. The astringent as

well as tonic properties of rhatany coupled with

the sedative action of cocaine render this combination

particularly useful and therapeutically effective. In tabloid

form, too, some advantage is gained over the ordinarylozenge which of necessity contains an excipient of no directtherapeutic value. A somewhat new departure is the pre-paration of tabloid B P. pills, each representing in dosageand active ingredients the corresponding pill of the BritishPharmacopoeia, 1898. We have examined the tabloid con-

taining aloes and iron (gr. 4) and the tabloid colocynth co.(gr. 4) as examples. But the list also includes well-known

combinations, as aloes and myrrh, blue pill, colocynth andhyoscyamus, ipecacuanha and squill, lead and opium, andrhubarb co. Judging from the ready way in which thecompressed tabloid breaks up in water the therapeuticaleffects of the drugs contained in them are sure to be gained.

SHERRIES: (1) PANDO; AND (2) CELESTINO.

(BERRY BROTHERS AND CO., 3, ST. JA:B1ES’S-S1’REET, LONDON, S.W.)

The samples submitted represent the two types of sherryknown respectively as "Sno" and "oloroso."

" The results

of analysis were as follows. Pando : alcohol, by weight13’31 per cent., by volume 16’43 per cent., equal to proofspirit 28-78 per cent. ; extractives, 1-89 per cent. ; mineral

matter, 0-44 per cent. ; potassium sulphate, 0’37 per cent. ;sugar, 0-20 per cent. ; tartaric acid, 0-36 per cent. ; acetic

acid, 0’10 per cent.; alcohol in volatile ethers 0’021 percent., alcohol in fixed ethers 0’031 per cent., total alcohol inethers 0’052 per cent. Celestino : alcohol, by weight 17’25per cent., by volume 21’19 per cent., equal to proof spirit37’13 per cent. ; sugar, 4’00 per cent.; tartaric acid, 0’34 percent. ; acetic acid, 0 08 per cent. ; mineral matter, 0’58 percent. ; potassium sulphate, 0’424 per cent. ; alcohol involatile ethers 0’0227 per cent., alcohol in fixed ethers0’0307 per cent., total alcohol in ethers 0’0534 per cent.These figures indicate the individual characters of the twowines. Thus Pando is a pale, delicate, dry wine with com-paratively low alcoholic strength. It is a "brut’’ wine andhas probably been matured for some years, judging fromits delicate ethereal flavour. The wine evinces distinct

quality, is free from excessive acid, and contains practi-cally no sugar. On the other hand, Celestino is somewhat.

sweet and nearer in alcoholic strength to that of port. It,.

is a very agreeable after-dinner wine, in which vinous flavouris well developed. The amount of sulphate of potassiumpresent shows that the treatment with sulphate of lime.has been kept within satisfactory limits.

EUCALYPTUS CITRIODORA OIL.

(LANGTON FORT AND CO., 20 AND 21, ST. DUNSTAN’S-HILL, E.C.)

According to fractional distillation this oil contains about75 per cent. of pure citronellon which has a boiling pointranging between 205° and 210° C. It is a clear colourlessoil with a very delicate and pleasant odour. The odourcalls to mind that of the variegated geranium leaf. It turnssemisolid with phosphoric acid and a similar reaction takesplace on the addition of bisulphate of soda. The oil hasbeen proved to be a powerful antiseptic and to many personsis much more agreeable than the better known variety,eucalyptus globulus. It may be used for the relief of coldsand other respiratory trouble and as a pleasant antiseptiC’for general purposes.

DRY SPARKLING WINE.

(THE VINEYARD BASKET Co., LTD., 22, BREWERY-ROAD, CALEDONIAN-ROAD, N.)

This is probably a grape-juice product, judging from the,results of analyses which we obtained and which are as.

follows : alcohol, by weight 8’64 per cent., by volume10’73 per cent., equal to proof spirit 18’81 per cent.; sugar,0’23 per cent. ; tartaric acid, 0’34 per cent. ; acetic acidA068 per cent.; extractives, 4’52 per cent.; and mineral

matter, 0’18 per cent. The wine is agreeably sparkling andat first not disappointing in general character and flavour-Of course, this wine does not possess in an equal degree those.peculiar qualities which characterise the choice sparklingwines as produced in the Champagne district. The wine’soon loses brilliancy and at this stage its flavour is quiteindifferent.

LOZONE.

(THE COMMERCIAL OZONE SYNDICATE, 31, LOMBARD-STREET, E.C.)Lozone is a slightly opalescent fluid containing, in addition

to peroxide of hydrogen, terpene oxidation compounds, as theresult of the oxidising action of peroxide of hydrogen onessential oils of the turpentine class. On analysis we foundthat lozone yielded just over one-half per cent. of a resinous’oil possessing a smell like that of camphoric acid. The solu..tion contained peroxide of hydrogen and 0’85 volume of avail-able oxygen per volume of the fluid. Peroxide of hydrogenis by no means a stable body, but the presence of oxygenatedterpenes adds materially to its-stability. Lozone is therefore

practically permanent and possesses in the same degree thewell-known antiseptic properties of peroxide of hydrogen of asimilar strength. Peroxide of hydrogen, it is stated, willsterilise water infected with cholera and typhoid bacilliwhen added in the proportion of 70 grammes to the gallon.

NAFTALAN.

(A. AND M. ZIVIMERMANN, 9 AND 10, ST. MARY-AT-HILL, E C.’ The preparation naftalan is a brownish-green oleaginouscompound devoid of smell and reaction. On treatment withhot water a greenish-brown oil separates which we find isnaftalan proper, while in the solution soap is easily recog-nised. In short, the ointment contains about 97 parts of a.peculiar, crude naphtha which is made into the consistenceof an ointment by the addition of soap. The crude naphthaitself is found in the Caucasus and from this raw productnaftalan is extracted. It appears to be readily absorbed bythe skin and to serve as an excellent vehicle for the applica-tion of antiseptic preparations such as mercurial salts.

Alone, naftalan is decidedly antiseptic and cases are

reported in which it has proved effectual in the treatmentof chronic eczema. While the ointment is fairly stiff it