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Lexington Medical Society Physicians caring for the community since 1799 MAY 2014 NEWSLETTER (continued on page 2) There are ICD-10 codes for being bitten by a turkey, being burned by flam- ing water-skis, or being locked for too long in a freezer. There are over 13,000 codes in the ICD-9 and over 68,000 codes in the ICD-10, a five-fold increase. Current cost estimates of the implementation of ICD-10 are three times greater than it was thought to be in 2008, and there is no funding for implementation. This is an unfunded mandate! Briefly the ICD-10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems – 10 th revision) is a medical classification owned by the World Health Organization (WHO). The code set allows for more than 14,400 different codes and can be expanded to over 18,000 codes by using optional sub-classifications. The international version of ICD-10 should not be confused with national Clinical Modifications of ICD which include more detail. For example, the US ICD-10-CM has 68,000 diagnostic codes and 76,000 procedure codes (ICD-10-PCS) not used by other countries. The Canadian version of ICD-10, introduced in 2000, uses about 18,000 codes; it is much less complex. Work on ICD-10 began in 1983 and was finished in 1992. It has been implemented in 25 coun- tries for tracking and resource allocation. It is not used for reimbursement. Australia adopted ICD-10 in 1998-1999, Canada in 2000, China 2002, France in 2005, Korea in 2008, etc. In the United States, ICD-10 required participation was announced in January 2009. The launch date was pushed back by two years. In March, 2012, Health and Human Services (HHS) announced another delay and in Sep- tember 2012 the Final Rule set a date of October 2013 for implementation. In February 2014, CMS stated that there would be no further delays and the deadline was set at October 2014. At the writing of this message the deadline for all HIPPA “covered entities” to make the change to ICD-10 has again been extended to October 2015. Why is there all this TENsion over implementation? Because it is cumbersome and cost- ly! According to a 2004 RAND (Research ANd Development) report prepared on behalf of HHS, the transition price tag was to be $425 million to $1.15 billion in one-time costs for system changes and training, plus up to an additional $40 million per year in lost productivity. In an address delivered by Barbara L. McAneny, M.D., chair person elect of the AMA Board of Trustees, at the 2014 National Advocacy Conference, she stated that her particular practice had secured a $4 million line of credit so they could “pay the bills” during any periods of payment delay or denial during the ICD-10-CM im- plementation. She also revealed a comparison of estimated practice costs to establish the system in 2008 vs 2014. Stratified by practice size they are as follows: Size 2008 2014 Small practice (3 doctors) $83,000 $56 -226,000 Medium practice (10 doctors) $285,000 $213-800,000 Large practice (over 20 doctors) $2.7 million up to $8 million President’s Message: ICD TENsion Thomas H. Waid, M.D.

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Page 1: Lexington Medical Society - members.kyma.org

Lexington Medical Society

Physicians caring for the community since 1799

M AY 2014 NEWSLETTER

(continued on page 2)

There are ICD-10 codes for being bitten by a turkey, being burned by flam-

ing water-skis, or being locked for too long in a freezer. There are over

13,000 codes in the ICD-9 and over 68,000 codes in the ICD-10, a five-fold

increase. Current cost estimates of the implementation of ICD-10 are three

times greater than it was thought to be in 2008, and there is no funding for

implementation. This is an unfunded mandate!

Briefly the ICD-10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases

and Related Health Problems – 10th revision) is a medical classification

owned by the World Health Organization (WHO). The code set allows for

more than 14,400 different codes and can be expanded to over 18,000 codes

by using optional sub-classifications. The international version of ICD-10

should not be confused with national Clinical Modifications of ICD which include more detail. For

example, the US ICD-10-CM has 68,000 diagnostic codes and 76,000 procedure codes (ICD-10-PCS)

not used by other countries. The Canadian version of ICD-10, introduced in 2000, uses about 18,000

codes; it is much less complex.

Work on ICD-10 began in 1983 and was finished in 1992. It has been implemented in 25 coun-

tries for tracking and resource allocation. It is not used for reimbursement. Australia adopted ICD-10

in 1998-1999, Canada in 2000, China 2002, France in 2005, Korea in 2008, etc. In the United States,

ICD-10 required participation was announced in January 2009. The launch date was pushed back by

two years. In March, 2012, Health and Human Services (HHS) announced another delay and in Sep-

tember 2012 the Final Rule set a date of October 2013 for implementation. In February 2014, CMS

stated that there would be no further delays and the deadline was set at October 2014. At the writing

of this message the deadline for all HIPPA “covered entities” to make the change to ICD-10 has again

been extended to October 2015.

Why is there all this TENsion over implementation? Because it is cumbersome and cost-

ly! According to a 2004 RAND (Research ANd Development) report prepared on behalf of HHS, the

transition price tag was to be $425 million to $1.15 billion in one-time costs for system changes and

training, plus up to an additional $40 million per year in lost productivity. In an address delivered by

Barbara L. McAneny, M.D., chair person elect of the AMA Board of Trustees, at the 2014 National

Advocacy Conference, she stated that her particular practice had secured a $4 million line of credit so

they could “pay the bills” during any periods of payment delay or denial during the ICD-10-CM im-

plementation. She also revealed a comparison of estimated practice costs to establish the system in

2008 vs 2014. Stratified by practice size they are as follows:

Size 2008 2014 Small practice (3 doctors) $83,000 $56 -226,000

Medium practice (10 doctors) $285,000 $213-800,000

Large practice (over 20 doctors) $2.7 million up to $8 million

President’s Message: ICD TENsion Thomas H. Waid, M.D.

Page 2: Lexington Medical Society - members.kyma.org

The mission of the Lexington

Medical Society is to enhance the

profession of medicine and to

provide service and leadership

responsive to the interests of

members and their patients.

Thomas H. Waid, M.D. President

David S. Kirn, M.D. Vice President

Jason P. Harris, M.D. Secretary-Treasurer

Rice C. Leach, M.D. President-Elect

Richard D. Floyd, IV, M.D. Vice President-Elect

Charles L. Papp Secretary-Treasurer-Elect

Larry L. Cunningham, Jr., M.D. Past President

Christopher Hickey Executive Vice President

Cindy Madison Editor

LMS NEWSLETTER The Official Publication of the

Lexington Medical Society

All rights reserved. This publication or any part thereof may not

be reproduced without the express

written permission of the Lexington Medical Society.

The appearance of advertising in

LMS publications is not a LMS guarantee or endorsement of the product

or the claims made for the product by

the manufacturer. The fact that an advertisement for a product, service or

company has appeared in a LMS

publication may not be referred to in collateral advertising.

The Lexington Medical Society

reserves the right to accept or reject any

advertising in the publication.

There is a $3.00/issue subscription

rate with a minimum of 11 issues.

2628 Wilhite Court, Suite 201

Lexington, KY 40503-3328

(859) 278-0569

(859) 277-3919 fax

Email:

[email protected]

www.LexingtonDoctors.org

Page 2

The reasons for this are simple:

1. Software upgrades

2. Testing of new systems

3. Productivity loss due to increased demands on time

4. Payment disruption which is worse if implementation does

not go well

The AMA advocated for delay and the CMS insisted that there

would be none. However, as you know, there has been another delay

until October 2015.

Three general sectors are involved in the ICD discussions in the

United States: healthcare providers who are mostly interested in post-

poning the implementation because of financial uncertainties and ques-

tionable quality gains, vendors who will gain monetary profits from the

new classification, and the government which holds a more neutral po-

sition and continues to postpone the requirement for transition to ICD-

10-CM for billing purposes.

It is challenging to estimate the costs and revenue generated by the

transition to ICD-10-CM. The evidence that exists about this transition

often seems to be outdated or anecdotal especially in the light of legis-

lative changes related to meaningful use of EHR. To make valid finan-

cial predictions, one needs high-quality evidence with a national scope

obtained by governmental agencies such as HHS or CMS. Equally

challenging will be the ability of ICD-10-CM to generate higher quali-

ty clinical data that will drive better health care management and im-

prove outcomes. Currently, evidence to support an improvement in

healthcare data is scarce.

The United States is the only industrialized nation that has not

switched to an ICD-10 based classification since the code set was first

endorsed by the WHO in the 1990’s. It is likely that an updated ver-

sion is needed, but which version? ICD-11 is expected to be released

by 2016 with an additional year needed to create a clinical modifica-

tion for the United States. Would it not make sense to spend the next

two or three years transitioning to ICD-11 and by-passing, ICD-10-CM

altogether? It would seem to be a more efficient use of the time allot-

ted. Until then, I’m going to buy nothing but fiberglass water-skis.

Page 3: Lexington Medical Society - members.kyma.org

CME OPPORTUNITY:

free to LMS members

For more information or to

register please go online :

http://cecentral.com/live/8442

This program is hosted by the UK Comprehensive

Epilepsy Program and the Lexington Medical Society.

Patients seek out physicians for many reasons. In most cases, the patient has specific symptoms character-

istic of a specific disease or disorder. In those cases, the patient is searching for a specific diagnosis and

treatment. In other cases, the patient has a chronic illness and is seeking continuity of care. More and

more, patients are seeking preventive therapies that increase longevity and wellbeing.

Patients want a physician who is professional, who is knowledgeable and skillful and who puts the con-

cerns of the patient above self.

What do patients want most from their physician? The reason for seeing a physician notwithstanding, the

basic need for all patients is reassurance and a sense of wellbeing…a sense of peace. Peace of mind that everything is indeed

normal or, if there are symptoms that result in a diagnosis, the peace of mind that the physician has the knowledge and skills

to make the diagnosis. And if the diagnosis is made, the peace of mind that there is a treatment that is appropriate for the di-

agnosis. Even if the disease is terminal, there is comfort in knowing that all reasonable attempts of care have been exhausted

and that the physician is knowledgeable about end of life care.

Inner peace or peace of mind as it relates to health care refers to a state of physical and mental wellbeing that only one’s

physician can provide. Peace in this case is a sense of serenity and calmness that is free of health-related questions and stress.

For the person with symptoms, it is the peace of knowing that there is a diagnosis. If there is a diagnosis, it is the reassurance

of knowing the physician will serve as a partner so that the disorder or disease can be treated effectively. If the history, physi-

cal examination and laboratory or radiological tests are all normal, it is the peace of knowing that all is well.

In some cases, the physician is more interested in obtaining a specific diagnosis or prescribing treatment than imparting a

sense of peace to the patient. Providing peace of mind is the most important part of the doctor-patient relationship.

Since 1799, the physicians of the Lexington Medical Society have cared for the patients of Lexington and Kentucky. In

addition to providing the knowledge and skills of true professionals, Lexington physicians take great pride in providing peace.

What do Patients Want Most? Emery A. Wilson, M.D.

Page 3

Page 4: Lexington Medical Society - members.kyma.org

Membership News

Page 4

LMS Foundation

Annual Golf Tournament

Wednesday, August 27

Nominations for LMS Awards

The Jack Trevey Award for Community Service will recognize an LMS member who performs outstanding service

to the community by direct involvement in the community beyond his or her role as a physician. Such individuals might

include physicians who volunteer in community programs, serve on school boards or are involved in local or state gov-

ernment.

The Carolyn Kurz Lay Person Award will recognize individuals other than physicians who reside or work in

Fayette County who perform distinguished service in the area of medical science, medical education, medical care or

other areas which directly impacts the health and well-being of Fayette County citizens.

Nominations are due by August 31 and will be solicited from members of the Society and from the community at-

large. The Awards Committee will review the nominees and select the recipient (s).

Mark your calendar now to attend the 164th KMA Annual Meeting at the Hyatt Regency

Louisville, Monday, September 15, through Wednesday, September 17. The theme of this

year’s Annual Meeting is “Focus Forward: The Path to Quality Care.” The first General

Session will be combined with the first House of Delegates meeting this year on Monday,

September 15, at 8:30 am, and will include the presentation of the KMA’s Strategic Plan.

This meeting is open to all KMA members.

Other meeting highlights include:

KPPAC will host a free reception Monday, September 15, at 5:00 pm.

The President’s Installation & Awards Dinner will be held Monday, September 15, at 7:00 pm (ticket required).

The closing session of the KMA House of Delegates will take place Tuesday, September 16, at 7:00 pm.

At least 15 medical specialty groups will host meetings & events on Tuesday & Wednesday, September 16 & 17.

The LMS office will be closed Monday, May 26

in observance of Memorial Day.

Congratulations to Dr. Jackie Noonan

who was named ‘Gifted Educator’ for

2014 by The American College of Cardi-

ology. This award recognizes someone

who has demonstrated innovative, out-

standing teaching characteristics that con-

tribute significantly to the field of cardio-

vascular medicine. She was awarded this honor March 31

in Washington, D.C. at the ACC annual meeting. Dr.

Noonan is a pediatric cardiologist at the University of Ken-

tucky Medical Center. She has been a member of the Lex-

ington Medical Society since 1963.

University Club of Kentucky

Watch for more information

coming soon!

Page 5: Lexington Medical Society - members.kyma.org

Page 5

The following applications for membership in the Lexington Medical Society has been received. Please forward any

pertinent information about the applicants to Thomas F. Whayne, Jr., M.D., chair of the Administrative Council, 2628

Wilhite Court, Suite 201, Lexington, KY 40503-3328.

Active Membership

Cheryl W. Lee, M.D.

ophthalmology 120 N. Eagle Creek Dr. # 500

Lexington, KY 40509

Applications Pending

Phonekeo Khamvanthong, M.D.

family medicine/hospitalist Baptist Health Lexington

Robert K. Salley, M.D.

cardiothoracic surgery 1451 Harrodsburg Road # D302

Lexington, KY 40504

Doctor Salley is a previous

LMS member.

Malay B. Shah, M.D.

transplant surgery UKMC

Stephanie Shumate, D.O.

anesthesiology Baptist Health Lexington

Doctor Shumate is a previous

LMS member.

Ryan J. Whitted, M.D.

fellow in ophthalmology 120 N. Eagle Creek Dr. # 500

Lexington, KY 40509

In-Training Membership

Syamala Reddy, M.D.

ophthalmology 200 Medical Center Drive # 3A

Hazard, KY 41701

Doctor Reddy is an active

member of the Perry County

Medical Society.

Associate Membership

Brian D. Smith, M.D.

family medicine 210 Bevins Lane # C

Georgetown, KY 40324

Page 6: Lexington Medical Society - members.kyma.org

Page 6

KMA Update Dale E. Toney, M.D., KMA 10th District Trustee

The Kentucky General Assembly recently concluded the 2014 session and the KMA was heavily in-

volved throughout the session. The KMA advocated and tracked multiple pieces of legislation, includ-

ing CME mandates, pediatric head trauma, smoke-free legislation, and opioid “good Samaritan” legis-

lation. In addition, the KMA worked extensively for tort reform through Senate bill 119. The KMA

worked with the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce running television commercials in major media mar-

kets. KMA president Fred Williams, M.D. wrote letters and opinions in publications throughout the

state, and former KMA president Shawn Jones, M.D. and former AMA Chairman of the Board Steve

Stack, M.D. appeared on Kentucky Tonight advocating tort reform among other issues. The KMA had extensive discus-

sions with the Kentucky Coalition of Nurse Practitioners and Nurse Midwives regarding collaborative agreements and

reached a compromise that led to new legislation that will become law this summer. Of course the KMA kept members

informed throughout the session with multiple Legislative Bulletins and KPPAC e-Connections. Although Senate bill

119 did not pass, it is obvious that important groundwork has been laid for a future bill to this effect. Thanks again to

the KMA lobbyists, Legislation Quick Action Committee, physicians and auxiliary members, who lobbied, participated

in the KMA Physicians Day at the Capital, contacted their legislators, donated to the KPPAC, and advocated for our

patients. Good job and keep up the good work!

The KMA continues to extensively reassess and self-evaluate through a Strategic Planning Committee that is cur-

rently formulating their final recommendations. They plan to present their recommendations to the KMA Board of

Trustees at the August meeting and then possibly to the KMA House of Delegates in September. The KMA Board of

Trustees and the Strategic Planning Committee heard from author Harrison Coerver, who wrote Race for Relevance, at

the April Board of Trustees meeting. His presentation was certainly challenging and inspirational. Many of these same

issues and principles apply to our local medical societies, including the Lexington Medical Society.

The KMA budget was presented at the April Board of Trustees meeting. Declining membership continues to have

negative ramifications to the budget. The current KMA reassessment and strategic planning, which will likely include

streamlining of resources, should help. However, the best long term solution is to increase our active membership.

Therefore, be sure to advocate for the KMA to your colleagues and physician friends. The KMA publishes a KMA

Board In Action summary every quarter, which is a short one page synopsis of recent KMA issues and action. This

makes a great talking point that you can use.

Again, thank you very much for allowing me the opportunity to serve as your KMA 10th District Trustee. Please

contact me if you have any issues at [email protected].

Page 7: Lexington Medical Society - members.kyma.org

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Page 8

LMS Member Profile: Amanda L. Faulkner, UK Medical Student Interview by Chris Hickey, CEO, Lexington Medical Society

Amanda Faulkner is what you get when you mix high intelligence, high achievement, and a

strong family. She is one of youngest members of the Lexington Medical Society, the medical

school student representative on the Executive Committee and on the Strategic Planning Com-

mittee, and is soon to be a medical doctor. She will start a residency program in Anesthesiolo-

gy at the University of Kentucky soon after graduation. She is a very driven person with a life

mantra of, “Do all that I can with what I have.”

What she has is considerable. She grew up in a coal-mining family in Barbourville, Ken-

tucky. Her father, a former coal miner, is her hero and has had a profound, positive influence on her. Her dad

encouraged her to think differently, work hard, and to keep a healthy work-life balance. She described herself

as a “girly-girl” growing up, being into gymnastics and cheerleading, which seems in contradiction to her oth-

er interests. She is an adrenaline junky who likes to sky dive, wants to get her pilot’s license, and is a closet

NASCAR and Cincinnati Reds fan. She did not grow up around the medical profession and came to the deci-

sion to pursue medical school late in her college career.

Amanda attended the University of the Cumberlands in Williamsburg, Kentucky with a plan on becoming

a chemical engineer. She worked all through college as a Pharmacy Technician. Only in her senior year did

she decide to go to medical school. What attracted her to become a physician was that she wanted to serve in

a hands-on career helping others. She graduated Summa Cum Laude with a 4.0 and a degree in Chemistry.

She feels the chemistry background is a good fit for Anesthesiology.

Amanda is a very active member of the Lexington Medical Society. She believes that active participation

in organized medicine is important to protect the patients as well as the profession and to “Get involved early,

stay up to date, and to have a stake in the game, or otherwise live with the result.” Her perspective, as part of

the Strategic Planning Committee, has been helpful in the development of the future direction of the Lexing-

ton Medical Society.

Amanda is near the end of her

academic career and about to begin

the rest of her life. Congratulations

to Amanda and to the 115 Universi-

ty of Kentucky Medical School stu-

dents who graduate on May 17th.

Page 9: Lexington Medical Society - members.kyma.org

Page 9

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Page 10

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Page 11

We provide Clinical

employees for your Practice

And Private Duty Caregivers

for your Patients.

859-296-9525

www.alliancelexington.com

Project CARAT- A “Win-Win Relationship”

“Helping people who really need help,” is what drives Walt Bower, the Project Coordinator for Project

CARAT (Coordinating and Assisting the Reuse of Assistive Technology). He is working to make assistive tech-

nology and durable medical equipment more accessible to individuals with disabilities in Appalachian Kentucky.

Walt, who earned a PhD from UK and lives in downtown Lexington, can make a “win-win” relationship with

those he partners with. His organization takes donated equipment, sanitizes it, makes repairs if needed, and then

redistributes it to people who need it to improve their health and quality of life. He has established a few partner-

ships with medical facilities in Lexington, but he is looking to partner with more.

Project CARAT uses a unique service learning approach which involves Appalachian students performing

much of the sanitizing and refurbishing of the equipment. The students, including physical therapy students, learn

about assistive technology and durable medical equipment, acquire a skill set with evaluating and repairing equip-

ment, and are better able to serve their patients within the community by making recommendations for equipment.

As this program completes the second year of a three year federal grant, they are making exciting progress as they

get the word out about Project CARAT to communities and form new partnerships in Appalachian Kentucky. To

date, they have provided 135 individuals with disabilities with medical equipment they otherwise could not afford.

While traveling throughout Appalachian Kentucky, they have also taken in over 1,600 donated medical items, in-

cluding bariatric power wheelchairs, manual wheel walkers, hospital beds, abdominal braces, bedside commodes,

walkers, quad canes, crutches, and shower chairs. If you have equipment to donate or need some assistive technol-

ogy or durable medical equipment, contact Project CARAT by telephone at 800-327-5287 or visit their website at

ProjectCARAT.org. You can contact Walt Bower by telephone (859-246-2185, extension 275) or by email

([email protected]) anytime if you have input about the project, other agencies to contact, speaking opportuni-

ties, or just would like to make a donation to Project CARAT. Funding for Project CARAT was made possible by

grant #D04RH23586 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services / Health Resources and Services

Administration.

Page 12: Lexington Medical Society - members.kyma.org

Surgery on Sunday is Focused on “Why” By Chris Hickey, CEO Lexington Medical Society

Page 12

“People don’t buy what you do; people buy why you do it.” That is the advice Simon Sinek, a professor at Columbia

University, imparts in one of the most watched Ted Talk videos* of all time with over 16.5 million views. By “why” he

means what is your purpose or cause. The key is to focus on “why” or purpose and like-minded people will, according to

Sinek, “…work for you with blood and sweat and tears.” Surgery On Sunday has cracked this code, and the results are

truly inspiring. If you are ever feeling down about society and where this world is going, you need to know about Sur-

gery on Sunday. I visited there not knowing what to expect, and came away really proud that there are people like this

who give freely of their talent and time in order to improve the quality of life and in many cases, alleviate suffering, of

members of our community who otherwise might not get care. I saw a medical all-star team made up of physicians, nurs-

es, PA’s, and other volunteers who were rewarded for their efforts not by money, but by fulfilling a higher, noble pur-

pose. The real story of Surgery on Sunday is not what they were doing, but why.

This “why” is hugely powerful, a combination of best-of-the-best talent infused with passion, enthusiasm and com-

mitment to their mission. Volunteers came from every major medical facility in the city, many private practices and as

far away as Nashville. It was a beautiful, Sunday morning, blue skies, 75 degrees, the horses were getting ready to race at

Keeneland, and this high-energy team couldn’t have been happier serving. Did you notice I didn’t say working? No one

I talked to said they were working. That is power. Tap this power, and you could accomplish anything.

Surgery On Sunday, Inc., according to its information pamphlet, “Is a non-profit organization that provides outpa-

tient surgical services for those who cannot afford insurance and are not eligible for federal or state programs. Patients

are referred from existing organizations in the community and receive much needed medical outpatient procedures.” The

facility is located at the Lexington Surgery Center, next to St. Joseph Hospital. It is a first of its kind program in the

United States that many other communities are trying to replicate. It has received national media attention and many ac-

colades.

Surgery On Sunday came into existence in 2005 and is the fulfillment of a long time vision of Dr. Andrew M.

Moore, II. Dr. Moore first started conceiving the vision back in the 1990’s when he was trying to figure out a way to pro-

vide much needed surgery to those in our community who did not have the means to afford it. Downing water, and phys-

ically drained after performing a three hour surgery, Dr. Moore said, “You don’t have to go to Africa or South America

to find poor people who need health care. You know you are changing their life, if you didn’t do it, it wasn’t going to

happen.”

Dr. Moore will be the first to tell you it is not about him, but his team. This team has performed, since the program’s

inception, over 5,400 surgical procedures, saved local hospitals over 28 million and Medicaid over 20 million dollars.

These staggering figures are pale in comparison to the amount of lives they have improved. Dr. Moore and his team are

careful not to burn their volunteers out, so they have limited the program to once a month and conclude by early after-

noon on Sunday.

Supporting the volunteer team is a small staff consisting of Laura Ebert, Executive Director, and Terri Cline, MSW,

patient coordinator. Together they make a strong pair that keeps this high energy team running. Laura said, “I have the

best job in the world.” According to Terri, “It is so rewarding. It is not like working.” It is amazing what they can do

with a relatively small budget.

You know something is different about this place when you first walk in the door. You are greeted by the two nicest

people you’d ever want to meet. Mary Ellen Amato, RN, known as Nurse Podgi, is sort of a legend in Lexington having

worked for decades in operating rooms. Sitting with her is Peggy Moore, Dr. Andrew Moore’s mother. They handed me

off to Dr. J. Michael Moore, Andrew’s brother and fellow team member. This passion is a family affair and there were

more than one multiple generations of families serving together on this team. We exited the lobby and entered the surgi-

cal center to find over 80 volunteers separated in smaller teams in various stages of eight surgical procedures.

Preparing for a surgery, was Dr. Paul A. Kearney. He was Chief of Trauma Surgery at UK for over twenty-two years

and has been with Surgery On Sunday from the beginning. Asked why he serves here Dr. Kearney said, “It is an obliga-

tion if you have a talent you should use it (to help others). If everyone gave away 10% of their time we could take care of

the entire planet.” Dr. Kearney’s daughter was also volunteering that day.

Surgery On Sunday is supported by many generous organizations, including the Lexington Medical Society Founda-

tion. If you would like to become involved with this noble effort and tap into your passion to serve for a higher purpose,

you can contact Laura Ebert at (859) 246-0046 or [email protected]. If you would like to help this program finan-

cially go to surgeryonsunday.org or through the mail: Surgery On Sunday, Inc, 650 Newtown Pike, Lexington, KY

40508.

Dr. Andrew Moore’s vision is to expand this incredible capability to other facilities, communities, and states. Baptist

Health and Kentucky One Health created similar programs under the Surgery On Sunday template. A program has start-

Page 13: Lexington Medical Society - members.kyma.org

ed in Louisville. Macon, Georgia and Omaha, Nebraska want to start programs. Dr. Moore wants to start an endowment

that would provide seed money for new programs to get off the ground. He’d like to get a Surgery On Sunday in every

sizable community in Kentucky and in every state. With the power I saw here, like-minded talented people focused on

“why” rather than “what”; dreams become reality.

* TED is a nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or less). Ted has innovative speakers from all over the world. You can view Simon Sinek’s video at this link: http://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek_how_great_leaders_inspire_action

Page 13

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Page 15

Members of the LMS answered phones for the 2014 KET Telefund. During our phone bank shift,

we raised $28,657 and our team raised an additional $800 with calls to friends, family & associates.

Thank you LMS volunteers:

Cheryl Broster, LMSA

Bruce Broudy, M.D.

Terry Clark, M.D.

W. Lisle Dalton, M.D.

Michael Hagen, M.D.

Vicki Hoven

Betty Nolan, LMSA

Jessica Ragland, LMSA

Mike Ragland, M.D.

Freda Sharp

John White, M.D.

Page 16: Lexington Medical Society - members.kyma.org

Lexington Medical Society

2628 Wilhite Court, Suite 201

Lexington, Kentucky 40503-3328

Address Service Requested

Presorted Standard

U.S. Postage

PAID

Lexington, KY

PERMIT NO. 14

Thank you to our May meeting sponsors:

Central Bank & Trust Company

and

Professionals’ Insurance Agency, Inc./Professionals’ Purchasing Group

For dinner reservations please call the Society office at 278-0569, fax this page to 277-3919 or email

[email protected] by Friday, May 9, 2014. Guest charge is $28.00. Please include the following:

Number attending: __________

Name of Member and Guest: ____________________________________________________

Please inform the LMS staff at the time reservations are made if you have any special dietary needs.

There will be a charge for guest reservations not cancelled prior to the meeting.

Payments to the Lexington Medical Society are not tax deductible as charitable contributions for federal income tax purposes. However, they may

be tax deductible under provisions of the Internal Revenue Service.

CME Credit: MRSA

By Daniel C. Rodrigue, M.D. Hilary J. Boone Center

at the University of Kentucky

500 Rose Street

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

6:00 p.m. exhibits / 6:30 p.m. dinner / 7:15 p.m. program

The Kentucky Medical

Association (KMA)

designates this activity

for 1.0 AMA PRA

Category 1 Credits.

Physicians should claim

only the credit commen-

surate with the extent of

their participation

in the activity.