Law Enforcement Conspiracy to solicit Bribes? ... Law Enforcement Conspiracy to solicit Bribes? Presented

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  • Law Enforcement Conspiracy to solicit Bribes?

    Presented as a courtesy of the scannedretina arnie@arnierosner.com 714-964-4056 Page - 1 The Scanned Retina; A Private Citizen Advocacy Membership Group, dedicated to Securing Lawful Constitutional Compliance for all Americans

    Reference: • Grants are Bribes • Bribes by any other names- One must accept the offer to consummate a transac:on..

    December 10, 2012 The Honorable Harry Reid Majority Leader United States Senate S-221, United States Capitol Washington, DC 20510 The Honorable John Boehner Speaker U.S. House of Representa:ves H-232, United States Capitol Washington, DC 20515 Dear Senators and Congressmen: The Honorable Mitch McConnell Minority Leader United States Senate S-230, United States Capitol Washington, DC 20510 The Honorable Nancy Pelosi Minority Leader U.S. House of Representa:ves H-204, United States Capitol Washington, DC 20515 We, the undersigned, who have dedicated our lives to preven:ng, figh:ng and prosecu:ng crime in our communi:es, write to urge Congress to prevent further cuts to non-defense discre:onary programs, par:cularly the Department of Jus:ce (DOJ) and other law enforcement grant programs, in any deficit reduc:on plan. The DOJ grant programs, essen:al in our fight against crime, have been cut by 43 percent since FY10. If the sequester is allowed to stand or alterna:ve reduc:ons are enacted, federal support for state and local law enforcement will be virtually eliminated. Crime control and preven:on rests primarily with the states and local governments. According to a 2008 es:mate by the Bureau of Jus:ce Sta:s:cs, of Census Bureau data, states and local governments invested $75.9 billion in “police protec:on.” The federal government contributed another $2.6 billion. This small (3.3 percent) federal contribu:on, however, is indispensable for several important reasons. First, the crime we see in our communi:es is increasingly driven by regional, na:onal and even interna:onal gangs and drug trafficking organiza:ons. Figh:ng these crimes requires sophis:ca:on and coordina:on across all levels of government in ways unheard of just a decade ago. State and local law enforcement officers are the first responders, the “boots on the ground,” in every criminal inves:ga:on, even those that become federal inves:ga:ons. We are the first responders for natural disasters and acts of terror. We are far more successful when we work across jurisdic:ons to track and enforce drug, gang, human trafficking and financial crimes. Federal support is vital to our collec:ve success. Second, the federal government plays a crucial role in spurring innova:on as well as tes:ng and replica:ng smart, evidence-based prac:ces. Through DOJ grant funding, we learn what works and are able to implement these successful approaches where they are needed. With over 18,000 law enforcement agencies across our great country, cross-jurisdic:onal learning cannot happen without federal support. Third, crime is down to levels last seen in the 1960’s. While many factors have played a role in crime’s decline, innova:ve policing prac:ces have been key. And it is federal support which tests and implements these measures, fine-tunes them over :me and adjusts them to fit the needs of individual communi:es. Crime would not be at this historic low absent these federal grants. We believe crime can and will rise again if the federal assistance is withdrawn. Fourth, business does not move into communi:es ridden with crime. We cannot restore our economy and grow private sector jobs without first preserving public safety and ensuring that crime rates stay low. Fihh, the federal grant programs have been the catalyst for broad changes in state criminal jus:ce policies, which have begun to realize significant savings in the cost of correc:ons. Texas, Ohio, Kansas, Michigan, and many other states have shown remarkable success in reducing crime, lowering recidivism,

    https://scannedretina.com/2016/09/30/grants-are-bribes/ https://scannedretina.com/2016/05/07/bribes-by-any-other-names-one-must-accept-the-offer-to-consummate-a-transaction/

  • Law Enforcement Conspiracy to solicit Bribes?

    Presented as a courtesy of the scannedretina arnie@arnierosner.com 714-964-4056 Page - 2 The Scanned Retina; A Private Citizen Advocacy Membership Group, dedicated to Securing Lawful Constitutional Compliance for all Americans

    restoring families, and saving taxpayer money – all at the same :me. In the true spirit of the states as laboratories of democracy, these proven prac:ces, funded in part by federal grants, can be adopted in the federal prison system in order to reduce overcrowding, break the cycle of recidivism, and reduce the rate of growth in the Bureau of Prisons’ (BOP) budget. Federal support for the DOJ jus:ce assistance grant programs has been cut by almost $1.5 billion over the last two fiscal years, a reduc:on of 43 percent, even as funding for the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) and the federal law enforcement and inves:ga:ve agencies has held steady or increased. This means the grant programs have borne the lion’s share of reduc:ons to DOJ’s overall budget. In FY11, the state and local earmark accounts were eliminated and many of the remaining grant programs were cut by 17 percent across the board. Together, the state and local grant programs were reduced by about $900 million, more than the cut to the overall Department’s budget of just under $700 million. Similarly, in FY12, DOJ’s budget increased slightly, but the grant programs were cut by another $570 million. Cuts of this magnitude have a real and serious impact on the ground, in communi:es na:onwide. In the summer of 2012, the Na:onal Criminal Jus:ce Associa:on and the Vera Ins:tute of Jus:ce conducted a survey of state and local criminal jus:ce prac::oners regarding the impact of these reduc:ons in funding. Because it was conducted before the FY12 grants reached the field, the responses reflect only the cuts in FY11. A total of 714 organiza:ons responded to the survey; the majority represen:ng state and local law enforcement and prosecu:on agencies. Nearly half of the respondents reported a decrease in federal support by at least one-third, and over half reported a reduc:on in their organiza:on's workforce by, on average, 3.4 FTEs, a sizeable cut in staff for small or rural law enforcement agencies. Respondents also were asked to put into words how this withdrawal of federal support has affected their ability to serve their communi:es. Their answers are illumina:ng. They vividly describe how cuts in one area ripple through the en:re jus:ce system. View a summary of the survey results at www.ncja.org. As Members of Congress, you face the thankless task of puqng our na:on’s financial house back in order while preserving the vital func:ons of government. As public safety officers, we can think of no higher purpose of government than protec:ng the public safety. We urge you to hear our story of the importance of the federal investment in state and local criminal jus:ce. Sincerely, Na#onal Organiza#ons Cabell Cropper, Execu:ve Director, Na:onal Criminal Jus:ce Associa:on Washington, District of Columbia Rich Stanek, President, Major County Sheriffs Associa:on Alexandria, Virginia Aaron Kennard, Execu:ve Director, Na:onal Sheriffs' Associa:on Alexandria, Virginia Tom Cochran, CEO and Execu:ve Director, The U.S. Conference of Mayors Washington, District of Columbia Darrel Stephens, Execu:ve Director, Major Ci:es Chiefs Associa:on Washington, District of Columbia Dennis Hallion, Execu:ve Director, Na:onal Troopers Coali:on Washington, District of Columbia David LaBahn, Execu:ve Director, Associa:on of Prosecu:ng Arorneys Washington, District of Columbia Jason Baker, Director of Government Affairs, Na:onal District Arorneys Associa:on Alexandria, Virginia Ron Brooks, President, Na:onal Narco:c Officers' Associa:ons' Coali:on West Colvina, California Jon Adler, Na:onal President, Federal Law Enforcement Officers Associa:on Washington, District of Columbia Joseph Akers, Interim Execu:ve Director, Na:onal Organiza:on of Black Law Enforcement Execu:ves Alexandria, Virginia William Johnson, Execu:ve Director, Na:onal Associa:on of Police Organiza:ons Alexandria, Virginia Elder Dr. Joseph S. Johnson, Na:onal Chaplain, Na:onal Organiza:on of Black Law Enforcement Execu:ves Alexandria, Virginia Ron Sloan, President, Associa:on of State Criminal Inves:ga:ve Agencies Lakewood, Colorado Alabama Steve Marshall, District Arorney, Marshall County District Arorney's Office Guntersville, Alabama Carl Preuninger, Inves:gator, JSU Police Department Jacksonville, Alabama

  • Law Enforcement Conspiracy to solicit Bribes?

    Presented as a courtesy of the scannedretina arnie@arnierosner.com 714-964-4056 Page - 3 The Scanned Retina; A Private Citizen Advocacy Membership Group, dedicated to Securing Lawful Constitutional Compliance for all Americans

    David Steward, President, Alabama State Trooper Associa:on Montgomery, Alabama Alaska Rob Cox, State Trooper, Alaska State Troopers / Public Safety Employees Associa:on Anchorage, Alaska Arizona John Blackburn, Execu:ve Director, Arizona Criminal Jus:ce Commission Phoenix, Arizona Jimmy Chavez, President, Arizona Highway Patrol Associa:on and Arizona Police Associa:on Phoenix, Arizona Sean Marson, President, Phoenix Police Sergeants and Lieutenants Associa:on Phoenix, Arizona Thomas Kelly, Deputy Chief, Apache Junc:on Arizona Police Department Apache Junc:on, Arizona Paul Moncada, Chief of Police, Benson Police Department Benson, Arizona Rod Rothrock, Ac:ng Sheriff, Cochise County Sheriff's Office Bisbee, Arizona Joseph Brugman, Chief of Police, Coolidge Police Department Coolidge, Arizona William Pitman, Chief of Police, Eloy Police D