LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY ASSESSMENT - measures of oral language proficiency than ... grammar, vocabulary,

  • View
    218

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY ASSESSMENT - measures of oral language proficiency than ... grammar,...

  • LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY ASSESSMENT

    What, Why, How?

  • What?

    Language Proficiency Assessments are intended to: Measure relative language proficiency in areas

    related to listening, speaking, reading, and writing Relative language proficiency is purported to be

    measured related to a native speaker of the language of the same age

    May also be used as measures of developing bilingualism

  • Why Assess?

    For compliance with relevant laws, and state/federal policies (e.g. Lau, NCLB)

    To determine HOW MANY students are ELLs (NEP, LEP, FEP)

    To evaluate growth in English over time To drive instruction

  • How do we assess?

    Formal language assessments (large scale) Used for compliance (NEP, LEP, FEP) and program

    identification (ESL/ELD, bilingual, dual language) May be used to measure growth Difficult to use to drive instruction LAS, IPT, Woodcock-Muoz CELA (2006-2012); ACCESS (2013)

  • How do we assess?

    Informal Assessments Used to drive instruction Used to get different information on students Used to measure growth

  • Informal Language Assessment: Student Oral Language Observation Matrix

    (SOLOM)

  • SOLOM - Overview

    Is a rating scale that can be used to assess an individuals command of ORAL language on the basis of observations and interview questions

    Purpose is to collect natural language samples (not academic language). Natural language measures are considered more

    reliable measures of oral language proficiency than discrete point tests

    Sensitive to growth and change over time in oral language

    Conducted individually

  • SOLOM - Overview

    Can be used to determine instructional needs in regards to ORAL language development

    Can easily be adapted into multiple languages (thus, a bilingual measure)

    Should be administered by person who scores a 4 or above

  • SOLOM

    Advantages Based on interview/

    observations Yields diagnostic

    information (work on grammar, vocabulary, etc.)

    Open ended questions (not discrete point)

    More comfortable way to assess students

    More enjoyable for students

    Can be used with multiple age groups

    Disadvantages 1 on 1 administration

    Time consuming

    Inter-rater reliability

    Favors out-going students (shy students may not talk as much)

    Avoidance strategies of L2 learners

    Assesses only oral language (not reading/writing)

  • SOLOM

    Measures five aspects of oral language proficiency: Comprehension, fluency, vocabulary, pronunciation,

    and grammar

  • Activity to familiarize yourself with the SOLOM

  • In pairs/triads

    Create a chart that describes each of the 5 aspects of Oral Language Proficiency from low to high level of proficiency

    1. Put the five aspects in order vertically: 1)Comprehension, 2) Fluency, 3) Vocabulary, 4)Pronunciation, and 5) Grammar

    2. Put the levels in order horizontally from lowest (1) to highest (5) for each aspect (color coded)

    3. Compare your chart to another group and discuss differences and make adjustments if needed

  • Scoring the SOLOM

    Scored on a scale of 1-5 for each aspect of oral language proficiency

    Students are assigned an overall score with a range of 5 through 25

    Add scores in each of the categories Example: Comprehension 4 + Fluency 3 + Vocabulary 3 +

    Pronunciation 2 + Grammar 1 = 13 Total Divide by 5 13 divided by 5 = 2.5

  • Interpreting the Outcomes

    Range will be from 0-5 Overall scores of 0-1 = NEP Overall scores of 2-3 = LEP Overall scores of 4-5 = FEP It is possible to assess relative bilingualism

  • Protocol for giving the SOLOM

    See handout bottom of page 2, section PROTOCOL, SCORING, and Interview Questions

  • Try it out!

    Read the SOLOM transcript between Wendy (teacher) and Ramn (student who is taking the SOLOM)

    In pairs - decide where Ramn falls on the rubric Calculate a score for each category and an overall

    score Discuss what the instructional implications are for

    Ramn Take notes on sheet

  • Ramn: Talking Points

    Scores for each area Strengths Needs and instructional implications

  • SOLOM Student Oral Language Observation Matrix

    Students Name: _________________________________________ Grade: _____________ Date: _________________

    Overall Score (English): ________________ (Spanish): ______________

    1 2 3 4 5 Comprehension Cannot be said to

    understand even simple conversation.

    Has great difficulty following what is said. Can comprehend only social conversation spoken slowly and with frequent repetitions.

    Understands most of what is said at slower-than normal speed with repetitions.

    Understands nearly everything at normal speech, although occasional repetition may be necessary.

    Understands everyday conversation and normal classroom discussions without difficulty.

    Fluency Speech is so halting and fragmentary as to make conversation virtually impossible.

    Usually hesitant; often forced into silence by language limitations.

    Speech in everyday conversation and classroom discussion is frequently disrupted by the students search for the correct manner of expression.

    Speech in everyday conversation and classroom discussions is generally fluent, with occasional lapses while the student searches for the correct manner of expression.

    Speech in everyday conversation and classroom discussions is fluent and effortless approximating that of a native speaker.

    Vocabulary Vocabulary limitations so extreme as to make conversation virtually impossible.

    Misuse of words and very limited vocabulary make comprehension quite difficult.

    Frequently uses the wrong words; conversation somewhat limited because of inadequate vocabulary.

    Occasionally uses inappropriate terms and/or must rephrase ideas because of lexical inadequacies.

    Use of vocabulary and idioms approximates that of a native speaker.

    Pronunciation Pronunciation problems so severe as to make speech virtually impossible.

    Very hard to understand because of pronunciation problems. Must frequently repeat in order to make himself or herself understood.

    Pronunciation problems necessitate concentration on the part of the listener and occasionally lead to misunderstanding.

    Always intelligible, though one is conscious of a definite accent and occasional inappropriate patterns.

    Pronunciation and intonation approximates that of a native speaker.

    Grammar Errors in grammar and word order so severe as to make speech virtually unintelligible.

    Grammar and word order errors make comprehension difficult. Must often rephrase and/or restrict himself/herself to basic patterns.

    Makes frequent errors of grammar and word order, which occasionally obscure meaning.

    Occasionally makes grammatical and/or word-order errors which do not obscure meaning.

    Grammatical usage and word order approximates that of a native speaker.

  • Student Examples

    Edgar Raquel Use their scores to determine LEPness and

    Bilingualism

  • SOLOM Student Oral Language Observation Matrix

    Students Name: _________________________________________ Grade: _____________ Date: _________________

    Overall Score (English): ________________ (Spanish): ______________

    1 2 3 4 5 Comprehension Cannot be said to

    understand even simple conversation.

    Has great difficulty following what is said. Can comprehend only social conversation spoken slowly and with frequent repetitions.

    Understands most of what is said at slower-than normal speed with repetitions.

    Understands nearly everything at normal speech, although occasional repetition may be necessary.

    Understands everyday conversation and normal classroom discussions without difficulty.

    Fluency Speech is so halting and fragmentary as to make conversation virtually impossible.

    Usually hesitant; often forced into silence by language limitations.

    Speech in everyday conversation and classroom discussion is frequently disrupted by the students search for the correct manner of expression.

    Speech in everyday conversation and classroom discussions is generally fluent, with occasional lapses while the student searches for the correct manner of expression.

    Speech in everyday conversation and classroom discussions is fluent and effortless approximating that of a native speaker.

    Vocabulary Vocabulary limitations so extreme as to make conversation virtually impossible.

    Misuse of words and very limited vocabulary make comprehension quite difficult.

    Frequently uses the wrong words; conversation somewhat limited because of inadequate vocabulary.

    Occasionally uses inappropriate terms and/or must rephrase ideas because of lexical inadequacies.

    Use of vocabulary and idioms approximates that of a native speaker.

    Pronunciation Pronunciation problems so severe as to make speech virtually impossible.

    Very hard to understand because of pronunciation problems. Must frequently repeat in order to make himself or herself understood.

    Pronunciation problems necessitate concentration on the part of the listener and occasionally lead to misunderstanding.

    Always intelligible, though one is conscious of a definite accent and occasional inappropriate patterns.

    Pronunciation and intonation approximates that of a native speaker.

    Grammar Errors in grammar and word