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TRADE ROUTES Land, Sea, & Sand Trade Routes 500-1500 ce

Land, sea, and sand trade

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Page 1: Land, sea, and sand trade

TRADE ROUTES

Land, Sea, & Sand Trade Routes

500-1500 ce

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Routes Around 300 BCE to 300 CE, merchants, shippers, sea captains, and empire-builders extended and strengthened trade routes across Afroeurasia and the Americas.

Empires Empires required networks of military and political communication. These networks encouraged interaction of many kinds over long distances.

Writing With the appearance of alphabetic writing systems in Afroeurasia, people could communicate faster and easier than ever before.

Religions The appearance of world religions— Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, and Christianity—stimulated cultural interchange across political and cultural boundaries.

Expanding Networks

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Expanding Networks: Routes

On the map are some of the goods traded along the Afroeurasian networks.

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2800 BCE 1900 BCE 500 BCE 1 CE 500 CE

Hinduism

Judaism

Buddhism

ChristianityReligions that Spread During Big Era Four

?

1200 BCE

Buddhism

Hinduism

Christianity

Judaism

Expanding Networks: Religions

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Growth of World Religions

In Big Era FourHinduismFrom lstmillennium BCE

BuddhismFrom 5th centuryBCE

ChristianityFrom 1st centuryCE

JudaismCommunitiesscattered widely inSouthwest Asia, Northern Africa, andEurope, especially from the first centuryCE.

Outline Map: Microsoft Encarta Reference Library 2002

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When people carried a new religion from place to place, they also often took along

•A writing system (This was useful in teaching holy scripture.)

•Trade goods (Religion was a basis of trust among merchants.)

•Art styles (Religious ideas were often expressed in painting, sculpture, and architecture.)

Expanding Networks: Religions

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SILK ROADS

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Silk Roads

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Trade Routes of Africa

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Silk Roads, Indian Ocean, & Trans-Saharan Trade Routes

On your maps, draw in the basic trade routes and label each.

Write the names of the main trade goods on that route.

SILK ROADS map p335, goods p 337 INDIAN OCEAN ROUTES map p 342, goods

p 343 TRANS-SAHARAN ROUTES map p 350,

goods = Gold, Salt, Slaves & page 349

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Silk Roads, Indian Ocean, & Trans-Saharan Trade Routes

On your maps, ADD: SILK ROADS –

Buddhism FROM South Asia TO Central, SE, & E Asia DISEASES (like Bubonic Plague, Measles, &Smallpox) Islam FROM the Middle East TO central and E Asia

INDIAN OCEAN ROUTES— Buddhism FROM South Asia TO SE Asia Islam FROM the Arabian peninsula TO East Africa & SE

Asia TRANS-SAHARAN ROUTES –

Islam FROM North Africa to West Africa

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Land, Sea, & Sand Trade

Continuities and Similarities

5 to 1400 ce

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CONTINUITIES and SIMILARITIES Trade between ecological zones started the

larger trade systems. Trade was often “relay” trade (and not between

“countries”) IMPORTANCE OF NOMADS! Routes held great diversity in cultures.

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CONTINUITIES and SIMILARITIES Cities and ports were trade centers. “Trade” in these centers made long term

relationships that led to cultural diffusion.

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CONTINUITIES and SIMILARITIES Ideas, culture, and diseases moved along

the routes with the travelers! “Luxury” items made up a significant

portion of the goods traded on the routes. Silk textiles, porcelain, cotton textiles, spices,

fragrances, precious metals, ivory, wine