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Keys to a Successful Webinar. Tech Support —For technical assistance, dial 1-202-939-9730 Q&A —To ask a question, simply type your question into the Q&A box on the right side of your screen. After all three of our speakers have presented, we will hold a full Q&A session - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Keys to a Successful Webinar

  • Keys to a Successful WebinarTech SupportFor technical assistance, dial 1-202-939-9730Q&ATo ask a question, simply type your question into the Q&A box on the right side of your screen. After all three of our speakers have presented, we will hold a full Q&A session

    VolumeAdjust the volume on your computers speakers and also through your system settings

    TeleconferenceTo join via telephone, dial 1-877-669-3239, access code: 661 058 011

    ArchiveThis webinar is being recorded, and the online archive will be available for view within 48 hours of the conclusion of this event

  • The Future of Higher Education in America: Are we Academically Adrift? June 15, 2011

  • Keys to a Successful WebinarTech SupportFor technical assistance, dial 1-202-939-9730Q&ATo ask a question, simply type your question into the Q&A box on the right side of your screen. After all three of our speakers have presented, we will hold a full Q&A session

    VolumeAdjust the volume on your computers speakers and also through your system settings

    TeleconferenceTo join via telephone, dial 1-877-669-3239, access code: 661 058 011

    ArchiveThis webinar is being recorded, and the online archive will be available for view within 48 hours of the conclusion of this event

  • Todays SpeakersTerry Hartle (moderator)Senior Vice President, Government and Public Affairs, American Council on Education

    Richard ArumCo-Author, Academically Adrift

    Josipa RoksaCo-Author, Academically Adrift

    Gary RhoadesProfessor of Higher Education, University of Arizonas Center for the Study of Higher Education; former General Secretary, American Association of University Professors

    Please submit your questions at any time using the chat panel in the lower right corner of your screen.

  • Academically Adrift:Limited Learning on College Campuses

    Dr. Richard ArumDr. Josipa Roksa

    *We thank the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Lumina, Ford and Teagle Foundations for their generous financial support and the Council for Aid to Education for collaboration and assistance with data collection.

  • Source: (University of Chicago Press, January 2011)

  • Determinants of College Learning DatasetLongitudinal DesignFall 2005, Spring 2007, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011

    Large Scale2005-2007: 24 diverse four-year institutions; 2,341 students2005-2009: 29 diverse four-year institutions, 1,666 students

    Breadth of InformationFamily background and high school information, college experiences and contexts, college transcriptsCollegiate Learning Assessment (CLA)

  • Course RequirementsNote: Based on Spring 2007 survey.

  • Students Time UseNote: Based on Spring 2007 survey.

  • Academic Commitment Over TimeSource: Phillip Babcock and Mindy Marks, forthcoming 2010Academic time from 1925-1965 in time diaries relatively constant (39.2 to 34.1)

  • CLA Performance: College MajorNote: Predicting 2007 CLA scores while controlling for 2005 CLA scores.

  • Inequality in CLA Performance: African American vs. WhiteNote: Based on a 3-level HLM model, controlling for a range of demographic/family characteristics.

    Chart2

    1074.4361138.55

    1079.1691184.615

    1120.1131231.571

    African American

    White

    descriptives

    Descriptives

    test scores by race and parental ed

    based on the full sample (i.e., all students, even if not present in every year)

    NOTE: the means and gaps across groups and years vary by sample (i.e., patterns would be different if we restricted to students present at all time points)

    Black students go slightly down in 2007 because of the addition of 2005 scores in 2009 (i.e., retrospective addition of 2005 scores for students who made it through all four years,

    which increases the 2005 score; if we considered 2005 score only for students present in 2005 and 2007, the 2005 score would be just under 1000)

    200520072009200520072009

    Black1010.51007.331073.04HS or less1079.381103.631175.6

    Hispanic1108.471152.071164.7Some college1082.641118.471163.59

    Asian1124.641147.791224.79College degree1135.031170.711223.7

    White1166.121211.431267.79Grad/prof degree1177.031220.481280.26

    descriptives

    000

    000

    000

    000

    2005

    2007

    2009

    baseline models

    000

    000

    000

    000

    2005

    2007

    2009

    predict class and race

    Table 1. Three-level HLM models estimating the relationship between individual background and CLA scores

    Model 1Model 2Model 3Model 4Model 5Model 6

    Intercept (average initial status)1144.760**1147.880**1138.550**1153.520**1153.560**1147.620**

    (18.097)(18.680)(18.180)(12.554)(12.563)(12.689)

    Parental education

    Some college2.8662.6923.087-9.244-9.221-9.094

    (8.424)(10.799)(8.420)(7.567)(7.567)(7.561)

    Bachelor's degree11.7709.50112.086-9.032-9.045-8.847

    (8.170)(10.357)(8.167)(7.367)(7.367)(7.361)

    Graduate/professional degree23.587**16.915^23.910**-1.377-1.347-1.078

    (8.196)(10.207)(8.194)(7.405)(7.404)(7.400)

    Race/ethnicity

    African-American-88.905**-88.980**-64.114**-40.825**-40.975**-16.688

    (9.969)(9.968)(11.443)(9.034)(9.034)(11.052)

    Asian-28.484**-28.456**-19.323-18.734*-18.736*-10.101

    (9.829)(9.829)(12.068)(8.798)(8.797)(11.265)

    Hispanic-22.355^-22.317^-14.2496.8646.86614.650

    (12.159)(12.158)(15.164)(10.950)(10.949)(14.312)

    Other-37.027**-36.947**-32.352*-22.956*-23.112*-18.709

    (11.452)(11.453)(14.781)(10.270)(10.270)(13.919)

    Male-2.438-2.420-2.300-11.286*-11.309*-11.190*

    (4.999)(4.998)(4.997)(4.484)(4.483)(4.480)

    Other demographics

    Non-English home language-41.782**-41.799**-41.495**-22.080**-22.027**-21.599**

    (8.792)(8.792)(8.790)(7.909)(7.908)(7.905)

    Two-parent household2.3132.2782.660-2.840-2.915-2.668

    (6.712)(6.713)(6.710)(6.027)(6.027)(6.023)

    Number of siblings-3.320-3.332-3.3230.5070.5280.570

    (2.286)(2.286)(2.285)(2.052)(2.052)(2.051)

    HS 70% or more non-white-20.647*-20.593*-20.534*-15.251^-15.286*-15.158^

    (8.691)(8.691)(8.691)(7.787)(7.787)(7.785)

    SAT/ACT0.457**0.433**0.454**

    (0.017)(0.020)(0.021)

    2007 average growth rate36.215**28.493**46.065**36.467**36.511**44.999**

    (4.062)(10.471)(5.062)(4.053)(4.050)(5.211)

    Interactions with Parental Education

    2007*Some college5.439

    (13.664)

    2007*Bachelor's degree7.698

    (12.937)

    2007*Graduate/professional degree12.168

    (12.453)

    Interactions with Race/Ethnicity

    2007*African-American-41.332**-34.617**

    (11.473)(12.942)

    2007*Asian-22.768^-21.860

    (13.717)(13.737)

    2007*Hispanic-3.0011.081

    (18.115)(18.342)

    2007*Other-16.307-15.420

    (18.561)(18.572)

    Interaction with SAT/ACT

    2007*SAT/ACT0.059**0.029

    (0.021)(0.024)

    2009 average growth rate83.646**81.720**93.021**84.100**84.161**95.233**

    (4.693)(12.118)(5.692)(4.659)(4.661)(5.869)

    Interactions with Parental Education

    2009*Some college-8.036

    (15.961)

    2009*Bachelor's degree-1.783

    (14.978)

    2009*Graduate/professional degree10.688

    (14.237)

    Interactions with Race/Ethnicity

    2009*African-American-47.344**-55.035**

    (12.998)(14.291)

    2009*Asian-2.805-1.824

    (17.525)(17.376)

    2009*Hispanic-36.256-41.576^

    (22.697)(22.736)

    2009*Other7.9377.191

    (22.678)(22.527)

    Interaction with SAT/ACT0.018-0.032

    2009*SAT/ACT(0.025)(0.028)

    ^p

  • Learning Within and Across Institutions23 percent of variation in learning (i.e., CLA growth between 2005 and 2009) occurs across institutions; the majority of variation is within institutions

    Chart1

    23

    77

    descriptives

    Descriptives

    test scores by race and parental ed

    based on the full sample (i.e., all students, even if not present in every year)

    NOTE: the means and gaps across groups and years vary by sample (i.e., patterns would be different if we restricted to students present at all time points)

    Black students go slightly down in 2007 because of the addition of 2005 scores in 2009 (i.e., retrospective addition of 2005 scores for students who made it through all four years,

    which increases the 2005 score; if we considered 2005 score only for students present in 2005 and 2007, the 2005 score would be just under 1000)

    200520072009200520072009

    Black1010.51007.331073.04HS or less1079.381103.631175.6

    Hispanic1108.471152.071164.7Some college1082.641118.471163.59

    Asian1124.641147.791224.79College degree1135.031170.711223.7

    White1166.121211.431267.79Grad/prof degree1177.031220.481280.26

    descriptives

    000

    000

    000

    000

    2005

    2007

    2009

    baseline models

    000

    000

    000

    000

    2005

    2007

    2009

    predict class and race

    Table 1. Three-level HLM models estimating the relationship between individual background and CLA scores

    Model 1Model 2Model 3Model 4Model 5Model 6

    Intercept (average initial status)1144.760**1147.880**1138.550**1153.520**1153.560**1147.620**

    (18.097)(18.680)(18.180)(12.554)(12.563)(12.689)

    Parental education

    Some college2.8662.6923.087-9.244-9.221-9.094

    (8.424)(10.799)(8.420)(7.567)(7.567)(7.561)

    Bachelor's degree11.7709.50112.086-9.032-9.045-8.847

    (8.170)(10.357)(8.167)(7.367)(7.367)(7.361)

    Graduate/professional degree23.587**16.915^23.910**-1.377-1.347-1.078

    (8.196)(10.207)(8.194)(7.405)(7.404)(7.400)

    Race/ethnicity

    African-American-88.905**-88.980**-64.114**-40.825**-