julie - Tammy Warner .COLE porter julie ANDREWS sammy ... popular culture, and music. ... Cole Porter

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  • SPRIN

    G 20

    07

    BAND!

    THE

    Strike Up

    carol CHANNING

    PRESENTING THE TALENTS OF

    fredASTAIREeleanor POWELL

    kathr ynGRAYSON

    howard KEEL

    jeromeKERN

    IRVINGberlin

    george and iraGERSHWIN

    COLEporter

    julieANDREWS

    sammyCAHN

    SPRIN

    G 20

    07

    BAND!

    THE

    Strike Up

    carol CHANNING

    PRESENTING THE TALENTS OF

    fredASTAIREeleanor POWELL

    kathr ynGRAYSON

    howard KEEL

    jeromeKERN

    IRVINGberlin

    george and iraGERSHWIN

    COLEporter

    julieANDREWS

    sammyCAHN

  • 16 Raspberries An interview with Carol Channing From Chapman University, CA

    10 Ol Man River A look at Showboat By Tammy Warner

    4 Cheek to Cheek The life of Fred Astaire By Tammy Warner

    BAND!

    Strike Up th

    e

    BAND!

    Strike Up the

    ADVERTISING

    BAND!

    THE

    Strike Up

    SPRIN

    G 20

    07

    MUSICALMEMORIES

    MUSICAL MEMORIES

    STRIKE UP THE BAND!

    9 Daniel Bartels

    14 Kevin Dominick

    21 Anisa Treon

    CONTENTS

  • Cheek

    Cheekto

    Cheek

    TheLife of Fred Astaire

    Cheek

    Cheekto

    Cheek

    TheLife of Fred Astaire

    Fred Astaire is one of the greatest actors of all time. For nearly a century, his dancing captured audiences. From his early years in vaudeville to his nine film legacy with Ginger Rogers, he has created some of the best musical movies from the 1930s to the 1970s. Astaire also worked with some of the best film-makers and songwriters of the twentieth century, includingdirectors mark Sandrich, Stanley Donen, George Stevens, and Francis Ford Coppola, cho-reographer Hermes Pan, and songwriters George and Ira Gershwin, Cole Porter, Jerome Kern, and Irving Berlin. He was the King of Tap, but also so much more. He was a loving husband and father, a hardworking actor, extraordinary dancer, and an all around good guy. His fifty year career has earned him the Academy Award for lifetime achieve-ment and has influenced a century of dance, movies, popular culture, and music.

  • Born on tenth of May in 1899 in Omaha, Nebraska, Astaire entered vaudeville at age five and performed with his sister, Adele, until her marriage in 1932. In 1933, he married Phyllis Livingston Potter, made his way to Hollywood and landed a role in the RKO film, Flying Down to Rio, with fellow newcomer, Ginger Rogers. This marked a nearly ten year contract with RKO Pictures and earned Fred and Ginger renown as the most famous dance duo of all time. Together, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers completed nine pictures during the Depres-sion years, including The Gay

    sequenceon roller skates to the song, Lets Call the Whole Thing Off and introduced another signature song, They Cant Take That Away From Me. While still under RKO contract, Fred Astaire ventured into movies without his partner, Ginger Rog-ers, in 1937 in another Berman and Stevens film, A Damsel in Distress. This time, his leading lady was Joan Fontaine and he also appeared with the comedy team, George Burns and Gracie Allen. This film also contained the music of Gersh-win and Hermes Pan took the 1937 Academy Award for Best Choreography. In 1940, Fred Astaires contract with RKO ended and he went to MGM Studios for a big musical, The Broadway Melody of 1940, the fourth in a series of Broadway films. Its predecessors, released in 1929, 1936, and 1938 had introduced songs like Singin in the Rain and actors like Judy Garland. Each version except the original featured the dancer, ballerina, and gymnast, Eleanor Powell. Even the talented Fred Astaire was nervous to be working with the woman known as he queen of tap. However, Fred prevailed and he, Eleanor Powell, and George Murphy

    Ginger was brilliantly effective. She made everything work for Her. Actually, she made things very fine for the both of us and she deserves most of the credit for our success.

    Divorcee (1934), Roberta (1935), Top Hat (1935), Swing Time (1936), Follow the Fleet (1936), Shall We Dance (1937), Care-free (1938), and The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle (1939). The lavish Art Deco sets and sophisticated dance numbers were stark contrast to the de-pression era and audiences loved the es- cape. Fred donned his famous top hat, white tie, and tales for the prolific song- writer Irving Berlin in Top Hat, which introduced one of Fred and Gingers signature songs, Cheek to Cheek. Pan-dro S. Berman produced and Mark Sandrich directed. In 1936, Berman teamed with Fred and Ginger again for the George Stevens film, Swing Time, which featured music by Jerome Kern, most famous for Show Boat. Director Mark Sandrich returned for the musical Shall We Dance, which featured the music of the incomparable George and Ira Gershwin. This movie included Fred and Gingers dance

    Puttin On the Ritz

    People think I was born in top hat and tails.

    rehearsed endlessly with Fred mapping out the choreography on the floor with chalk. In the end, they all had fun and Fred and Eleanor became good friends, inspiring dancers such as Ann Miller. Director Norman Taurog and producer Jack Cummings orig-inally wanted the film to be shot in color, but the approaching war limited budgets. The black and white pho-tography, though, actually enhanced the linear and reflective Art Deco sets created to accom-pany the Cole Porter music. A Cole Porter classic, Begin the Beguine, served as the grand finale of the film, set amidst the largest set of its kind, an Art Deco stage filled with 10,000 light bulbs for stars and thirty foot mirrors. The floor that Fred and Eleanor do their famous tap dancing on was a 6500 square foot glass mirror, made especially at MGM because

    no outside glass company would tackle the project. The movie was a hit and would be the only time the two most talented dancers of the era would perform together. After his MGM success, Fred Astaire joined Mark San-drich again for a Universal film, Holiday Inn. This time, he would join the famous crooner, Bing Crosby, and the two would sing and dance to some of Irving Berlins most famous works, including Easter Parade and White Christmas. Just as Crosby went on to star in a whole film centered around White Christmas, Fred Astaire did a movie by the name of Easter Parade, with Judy Garland, Ann Miller, and future Rat Pack member, Peter

    Lawford. This film contained some of the most well known musical numbers, including the famous Happy Easter with Judy Garland, Peter Lawfords Fella With an Umbrella, and the graceful It Only Happens When I Dance With You with Ann Miller. In 1949, he was reunited with his original dance partner, Ginger Rogers, for their last movie together and only movie together shot in color, The Barkeleys of Broadway, in which they nostalgically sang their old song from Shall We Dance, They Cant Take That Away From Me. In 1950, Astaire joined comedian Red Skelton and dancer Vera-Ellen in Three Little Words, which included a very brief part by the young newcomer Debbie Reynolds. The following year, Fred ap-peared in Royal Wedding with the young soprano Jane Powell, Peter Lawford, Sarah Churchill, and Keenan Wynn, the son of Ed Wynn. Best known for musi-cals such as Singin In the Rain and Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Stanley Donen creat-ed an extravagant, Technicolor musical that MGM was known

    Its nice that all the composers have said that nobody interprets a lyric like Fred Astaire. But when it comes to selling records I was never worth anything particularly except as a collectors item.

    Astaires best friend was songwriter Irving Berlin, who wrote the music to many of his movies. They first met during the production of Top Hat.

  • for during the 1950s. This film featured one of Fred Astaires most famous dance sequences, in which he dances on the loors and ceilings of his bedroom. Astonishing cinematography at the time, the scene was cre-ated by constructing a square room with one wall open and slowly rotating the set on an axis as Fred danced. This film also included Astaires number, I Lost My Hat in Haiti, and How Could You Believe Me When I Said I Loved You When You Know Ive Been a Liar All My Life with Jane Powell. As Astaire grew older, he still appeared in movies such as Funny Face with Audrey Hep-burn. He also began providing his voice for various Christmas cartoons during the 1960s and 1970s. One of his last musical pictures as a Warner Brothers film, Finians Rainbow, released in 1968 and directed by Francis Ford Coppola. Based on the 1947 Broadway play, the film also starred Tommy Steele from

    I have never had anything that I can remember in the business, and that includes all the movies and the stage shows and everything, that I didnt enjoy. I didnt like some of the small time vaudeville, because we werent going on and getting better. Aside from that, I didnt dislike anything.

    I suppose I made it look easy, but gee whiz, did I work and worry.

    The Happiest Millionaire and Half a Sixpence, Keenan Wynn from Royal Wedding and Kiss Me, Kate, and singer Petula Clark, best known for the song Downtown. Like similar musicals from the 1960s such as The Unsinkable Molly Brown and The Sound of Music, Finians Rainbow was featured as a road show, with an overture and intermission as if it were a stage production. It was filmed in seventy millimeter with six track stereophonic sound, and Hermes Pan of Astaires previ-ous A Damsel in Distress was the choreographer. After the death of his wife, Phyllis, Fred married Robyn Smith and they lived happily together until his death on June 22, 1987. He left the world two children, a

    star on the Hollywood Walk of Fa