Judith Dobler TRACEY Journal DK 2012

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    Drawing and Visualisation Research

    Published in TRACEY| journal

    Drawing Knowledge

    May 2012

    www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/

    sota/tracey/

    tracey@lboro.ac.uk

    DRAWING KNOWLEDGE

    Judith Dobler a

    a Academy of Art and Design Basel, Germany

    info@judithdobler.de

    mailto:info@judithdobler.demailto:info@judithdobler.de
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    INTRODUCTION

    The visual material submitted for Tracey Drawing Knowledge, was executed during the

    Masters program Masterstudio Design HGK Basel between October 2010 and June 2011.

    The project Sketching Line and Figure between Abstraction and Description explores

    two different approaches to sketching and drawing. I produced three experimental drawing

    series using observation and physical gestures of the body. I applied methods such asrepetition, transformation and layering, in order to understand the epistemic process of

    drawing in experimental settings. The process of shifting from analog to digital techniques

    played an important role in all experiments. The knowledge gained during the making of

    drawings, models and series is documented in these images.

    CONTEXT

    Line and Figure between Abstraction and Description is a sketch project which emerged

    during the interdisciplinary masters program in Basel. In the Masterstudio theory andpractice are closely linked in order to allow the students to experiment both practically and

    theoretically, as well as reflect upon design outside traditional disciplines. In this context,

    the project evolved into an investigation into the involvement of the body while drawing and

    sketching, and how the knowledge gained can be visualised.

    As a graphic designer with a descriptive and illustrative approach to drawing, I wanted to

    look more closely at the drawing process, in order to develop a way of sketching which

    allowed me to be free and experimental with tools and techniques. The body and its

    movement were ever-present themes which pervaded the opposing sides of descriptive

    and abstract drawing.

    I often begin a project by producing a series, creating material which I can develop a body

    of work from and reflect upon. The sketch series were all executed in a non-linear way

    during the same period of time, with the aim being to allow hand and body to take

    precedent over thought processes.

    The first experimental series was about using the body as a drawing tool in draft and

    design processes. I created two series of drawings by observing gestures, the use of the

    hands and the resulting craftsmanship. For the series LINES, I recorded the movements of

    the body using lines during the drawing process. In the series JOINTS, the body movementsof wrist, shoulder and elbow generated forms which were then translated into models by

    turning analog into digital data. These 3D models were produced from analog sketches by

    scanning, interpreting and modeling vectors, rendering and finally using rapid

    manufacturing tools.

    For the second experiment, I focused on observation as a method, because it is an

    essential tool in drawing and all other forms of research. I observed the variation of a

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    JACKET hanging on a chair, sketching its contours on a daily basis over the course of a

    month. The use of The Self as research subject or object is a method frequently used in

    scientific and artistic research. For the third experiment, I used myself as the subject. Every

    day, after waking up, I executed five-minute SELF-PORTRAITS.

    I conclude with some written reflections about my experience and a summary of the

    investigation of the process of sketching and the knowledge involved.

    A: EMBODIED KNOWLEDGE

    Experiments in using the body as a drawing tool for drafts.

    In the series of drawings entitled LINES (14), I visually recorded the movements of the

    body with drawn lines. During the process of drawing, the connection between the hand

    and the drawing tool changes from unconscious use into a very conscious gesture. Everysubtle mistake was revealed as I tried to draw straight lines from the left side to the right

    side of the paper. In these drawings, the body as an instrument for drawing become

    visible, as do its attendant imperfections. These observations led to a more experimental

    series which also uses the body as a tool.

    LINES 1, JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. INDIAN INK ON PAPER, PEN, 59 X 84 CM.

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    LINES 2, JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. INDIAN INK ON PAPER, BRUSH, 59 X 84 CM.

    LINES 3, JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. FELT TIP PEN ON PAPER, 59 X 84 CM.

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    EMBODIED_KNOWLEDGE_LINES_4.JPG: LINES 4, JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. FELT TIP PEN ON PAPER, 59 X 84 CM.

    The conscious and precise use of the wrist joint as a drawing tool produces a variety of

    shapes. The constant movement of the joint creates closed forms in the drawing. These

    forms also seem to enclose the movement of the body in space. The images have adynamic appearance and spatial depth, due to changes in the body movement and

    resulting differences in the transmission of strength and pressure onto pencil and paper.

    PHOTO OF DRAWING PROCESS, JUDITH DOBLER, 2010.

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    HANDGELENK 1, JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. INDIAN INK ON PAPER, PEN, 42 X 21 CM.

    HANDGELENK 2, JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. INDIAN INK ON PAPER, PEN, 42 X 21 CM (DETAILS).

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    In these images, the elbow was used as a drafting tool. When I noticed a sense of space in

    the two-dimensional Wrist Drawings, I began translating the analog drawing into a digital

    image. The Elbow Drawing was transformed into vectors and grids using digital rendering

    software, then rendered into three-dimensional shapes.

    PHOTO OF DRAWING PROCESS, JUDITH DOBLER, 2010.

    ELLBOGEN (LEFT), JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. FINELINER ON PAPER, 21 X 30 CM. ELLBOGEN MODELLE (RIGHT), JUDITHDOBLER, 2010. DIGTIAL RENDERING

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    e

    The movement of shoulder and arm was used as a drafting tool. This drawing is

    significantly larger than the others. Like the Elbow Drawings the drawings were scanned,

    vectorized and transformed into grid models and three-dimensional shapes using rendering

    software. I noticed that the forms become rounder and less angular as the movements of

    the body increase.

    PHOTO OF DRAWING PROCESS, JUDITH DOBLER, 2010.

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    SCHULTER 1 (LEFT), JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. FELT TIP PEN ON PAPER, 90 X 130 CM. SCHULTER FORMEN 1 (RIGHT),JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. DIGITAL RENDERING.

    SCHULTER 2 (LEFT), JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. FELT TIP PEN ON PAPER, 90 X 130 CM. SCHULTER FORMEN 2 (RIGHT),JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. DIGITAL RENDERING

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    SCHULTER 3 (LEFT), JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. FELT TIP PEN ON PAPER, 90 X 130 CM. SCHULTER GITTER 3 (TOP RIGHT),JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. DIGITAL RENDERING. SCHULTER FORMEN 3 (BOTTOM RIGHT), JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. DIGITALRENDERING.

    Rapid prototyping/manufacturing is a technique used for transforming 3D images into 3D

    models. The lines of digitalized and vectorized drawings were translated into tubes which

    define the material thickness in the production process. The three spatial models are

    based on three Shoulder drawings and can be understood as a spacial interpretation of

    the sketches.

    SCHULTER MODELL 1 (LEFT), JUDITH DOBLER, 2011. NYLON, SELECTIVE LASER SINTERING (SLS), 10 X 10 X 10 CM.SCHULTER MODELL 1 (TOP RIGHT), JUDITH DOBLER, 2011. DIGITAL RENDERING. SCHULTER MODELL 1 (BOTTOM RIGHT),JUDITH DOBLER, 2011. RAPID PROTOTYPING, 3D MODEL PREVIEW.

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    SCHULTER MODELL 2 (LEFT), JUDITH DOBLER, 2011. NYLON, SELECTIVE LASER SINTERING (SLS), 10 X 10 X 10 CM.SCHULTER MODELL 2 (TOP RIGHT), JUDITH DOBLER, 2011. DIGITAL RENDERING. SCHULTER MODELL 2 (BOTTOMRIGHT), JUDITH DOBLER, 2011. RAPID PROTOTYPING, 3D MODEL PREVIEW.

    SCHULTER MODELL 3 (LEFT), JUDITH DOBLER, 2011. NYLON, SELECTIVE LASER SINTERING (SLS), 10 X 10 X 10 CM.SCHULTER MODELL 3 (TOP RIGHT), JUDITH DOBLER, 2011. DIGITAL RENDERING. SCHULTER MODELL 3 (BOTTOMRIGHT), JUDITH DOBLER, 2011. RAPID PROTOTYPING, 3D MODEL PREVIEW.

    B: EPISTEMIC OBJECT JACKET

    For this experiment, I sketched a jacket, hung randomly on a chair, over a period of 24

    days, from November 11th until December 24th, 2010. If the sketches are arranged on a

    timeline, the jacket begins to move or dance. Observing the jacket in sketch form makes

    the formerly liveless object come alive. The drawn object (jacket) also makes the invisible

    object (chair) visible with its continually transforming shape.

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    JACKE BER EINEM STUHL HNGEND #124, JUDITH DOBLER, 2010. PENCIL ON PAPER, 24 DRAWINGS, 21 X 30 CM.

    JACKE TANZEND, JUDITH DOBLER, 2011. ANIMATION

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    C: FROM LINE TO FIGURE SELF-PORTRAITS

    I d