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708 lead works had good health. In a very short time, how- ever, she became subject to the poisonous influence of the lead, had convulsions and colic, followed by the usual train of symptoms, ending in death. The coroner, in summing up, said it would be a great advantage to the people em- ployed at lead works if something could be invented to render their labour less dangerous. He was afraid, how- ever, that the precautions which ha.l been already brought into use were not resorted to as much as they ought to be by those who had to work in lead factories. Newcastle-on-Tyne, Oct. 4th. IRELAND. (From our own Correspondent.) QUEER’S COLLEGE, CORK: THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. The President, in his report just issued for the past session’ refers to his previous report, in which he dwelt upon the advisability of enlarging the scope of the teaching in the medical school, so as to enable it to perform efficiently the increased work imposed upon it, in consequence of the rapid growth of medical science, and the gradual enlargement of the medical curriculum of the Royal University. For this purpose he suggested the teaching of physiology, separated from that of anatomy, and the establishment of a special chair of physiology. He also recommended the establishment of two new chairs, one of human and comparative pathology, and the other of public health, including medical jurispru- dence. The proposed enlargement of the scope of teaching in the Medical Faculty suggests the necessity of likewise improving the clinical teaching in the Cork hospitals, as any efforts to bring the teaching at the College up to the present level of medical science must remain almost fruitless with- out the thorough co-operation of the hospitals. The mate- rials for practical teaching in the general and special hospitals, if the Union Hospital is included, which is now open to students, are very good, and the president suggests that the staffs of all the hospitals in Cork should unite for teaching purposes, classify the students who attend the Cork School of Medicine, and so arrange their clinical teaching that everyone might be able to get the full benefit of it. Under such an organisation the time of both teacher and student would be much economised; while better provision than now exists could be made for teaching junior students. At present these form part of the helpless crowd of young men, who, with a nucleus of real working students, follow the physician or surgeon from ward to ward, and who, lacking systematic preliminary knowledge of disease, are unable to benefit by the clinical teaching suited for the advanced students. Again, the staff of the larger hospitals should be increased by a number of assistant physicians and surgeons, who should conduct, under the direction of the senior members of the staff, a large part of the clinical teaching. In this way there would be formed a body of competent candidates accustomed to teach, and likely to keep themselves in the current of medical science, from whom to select persons to fill such vacancies as would from time to time occur in the staff. Clinical clerkships and dresserships also should be estab- lished, these important offices being given after a practical examination by examiners appointed by the associated hospital staffs, and a certificate given to each student at the end of his term of office. ROYAL UNIVERSITY OF IRELAND. Earl Dufferin has been selected to succeed the late Duke of Abercorn as Chancellor of this University. The election for a member of the Senate will take place towards the end of this month, when a very exciting contest may be expected. NATIONAL ORTHOPEDIC AND CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL, DLTBLIN. The committee of this hospital, having determined to move into larger and more commodious premises, have decided to issue an appeal for the necessary funds to enable them to secure a larger building and furnish the same up to all the modern requirements of a children’s hospital. The institution is a deserving one, and it is sincerely to be hoped that the amount required may speedily be subscribed. Dublin, Oct. 6th. PARIS. (From our own Correspondent.) M. POLAILLON’S GASTROSTOMY CASE. AT the meeting of the Academy of Medicine last week, M. Polaillon exhibited the patient on whom he had per- formed the operation of gastrostomy for the removal of a. fork from the stomach, and to which you referred in an annotation in THE LANCET of September 25th. The operation has been most successful in all respects. The patient has remained quite well and hearty, and when presented he held in his hand the fork that he had swallowed. There was no symptom whatever of peri- tonitis, but immediately after the operation he was seized with jaundice, which lasted a few days. This was followed by a small abscess, which opened at the inferior part of the wound, but soon healed. No other untoward symptom occurred, and at the end of three weeks after the operation the man was able to get up and go about the garden of the hospital. There is evidently no adhesion between the. incision of the stomach and that of the abdominal parietes, as that organ can be felt moving freely in the peritoneal cavity. The " suture perdue " was therefore a complete success, and reflects great credit on M. Polaillon, who per- formed the operation, and who was the first to employ thi& form of suture in such cases. CYSTICERCI IN MUTTON. M. Johannes Chatin, the newly-elected member and son of Professor Chatin, then ascended the tribune, and read a. paper on 11 Ladrerie " in sheep. Up till now the flesh of sheep was considered, when eaten in a raw state, to be a& dangerous as pork and beef, owing to the presence of cysticerci in the muscular tissue. According to M. Chatin? however, there is nothing to be apprehended in eating mutton raw, as, although the presence of cysticerci has been established in the flesh of sheep, they are never found in such numbers as to determine a veritable "ladrerie," and, as they do not attain the development of the cysticerci of pigs and oxen, there is no danger of their transmission ta the human species. M. Chatin therefore concludes that mutton in its raw state may be safely prescribed whenever such a form of treatment is indicated. ABNORMAL PNEUMONIA. Dr. Netter of Nancy related a case at the Congres& recently held at that town of an individual with a palustral diathesis, who was suddenly seized with pneumonia, most probably of the same origin, for instead of following its ordinary course the malady presented a certain inter- mittence. Sulphate of quinine was prescribed by way of trial, and a few days afterwards the patient was cured. The author thinks that in cases of abnormal pneumonia it would be useful to examine the patient, not only morning and evening, but several times during the day, as any slight re- mission might pass away unperceived. If Dr. Netter hadnot examined his patient during the febrile remission, he would not have recognised the particular nature of the affection. Paris, Oct. 5th. _______ THE SERVICES. ADMIRALTY. — The following appointments have been made:-Staff Surgeon James Dunlop, to the Egeria; Surgeon Alexander F. Harper, to the Algerine; Surgeon Howard J. C. Todd, to the Ganges; Surgeon A. S. Nance, to the Swallow; and Deputy Inspector-General Francis W. Davies, to Jamaica Hospital. RIFLE VOLUNTEERS.—1st Wiltshire: The following Sur- geons are granted the honorary rank of Surgeon-Major:- G.C. Taylor, M.B., and F. F. Lee. SCARLET FEVER EPIDEMIC IN DUNDEE.-No less than 263 fresh cases of scarlet fever were reported to the sanitary authorities of Dundee during the month of September. They have occurred principally in the more crowded parts of the town, although no district has been entirely free of the epidemic.

IRELAND

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lead works had good health. In a very short time, how-ever, she became subject to the poisonous influence of thelead, had convulsions and colic, followed by the usual trainof symptoms, ending in death. The coroner, in summingup, said it would be a great advantage to the people em-ployed at lead works if something could be invented torender their labour less dangerous. He was afraid, how-ever, that the precautions which ha.l been already broughtinto use were not resorted to as much as they ought to beby those who had to work in lead factories.

Newcastle-on-Tyne, Oct. 4th.

IRELAND.

(From our own Correspondent.)

QUEER’S COLLEGE, CORK: THE MEDICAL SCHOOL.The President, in his report just issued for the past session’

refers to his previous report, in which he dwelt upon theadvisability of enlarging the scope of the teaching in themedical school, so as to enable it to perform efficientlythe increased work imposed upon it, in consequence of therapid growth of medical science, and the gradual enlargementof the medical curriculum of the Royal University. For this

purpose he suggested the teaching of physiology, separatedfrom that of anatomy, and the establishment of a specialchair of physiology. He also recommended the establishmentof two new chairs, one of human and comparative pathology,and the other of public health, including medical jurispru-dence. The proposed enlargement of the scope of teachingin the Medical Faculty suggests the necessity of likewiseimproving the clinical teaching in the Cork hospitals, as anyefforts to bring the teaching at the College up to the presentlevel of medical science must remain almost fruitless with-out the thorough co-operation of the hospitals. The mate-rials for practical teaching in the general and specialhospitals, if the Union Hospital is included, which is nowopen to students, are very good, and the president suggeststhat the staffs of all the hospitals in Cork should unite forteaching purposes, classify the students who attend theCork School of Medicine, and so arrange their clinicalteaching that everyone might be able to get the fullbenefit of it. Under such an organisation the time of bothteacher and student would be much economised; whilebetter provision than now exists could be made for teachingjunior students. At present these form part of the helplesscrowd of young men, who, with a nucleus of real workingstudents, follow the physician or surgeon from ward to ward,and who, lacking systematic preliminary knowledge ofdisease, are unable to benefit by the clinical teachingsuited for the advanced students. Again, the staff of the

larger hospitals should be increased by a number of assistantphysicians and surgeons, who should conduct, under thedirection of the senior members of the staff, a large partof the clinical teaching. In this way there would beformed a body of competent candidates accustomed to

teach, and likely to keep themselves in the current ofmedical science, from whom to select persons to fill suchvacancies as would from time to time occur in the staff.Clinical clerkships and dresserships also should be estab-lished, these important offices being given after a practicalexamination by examiners appointed by the associatedhospital staffs, and a certificate given to each student at theend of his term of office.

ROYAL UNIVERSITY OF IRELAND.

Earl Dufferin has been selected to succeed the late Duke ofAbercorn as Chancellor of this University. The election fora member of the Senate will take place towards the end ofthis month, when a very exciting contest may be expected.

NATIONAL ORTHOPEDIC AND CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL,DLTBLIN.

The committee of this hospital, having determined tomove into larger and more commodious premises, havedecided to issue an appeal for the necessary funds to enablethem to secure a larger building and furnish the same up toall the modern requirements of a children’s hospital. Theinstitution is a deserving one, and it is sincerely to be hopedthat the amount required may speedily be subscribed.

Dublin, Oct. 6th.

PARIS.

(From our own Correspondent.)

M. POLAILLON’S GASTROSTOMY CASE.AT the meeting of the Academy of Medicine last week,

M. Polaillon exhibited the patient on whom he had per-formed the operation of gastrostomy for the removal of a.fork from the stomach, and to which you referred inan annotation in THE LANCET of September 25th. The

operation has been most successful in all respects. The

patient has remained quite well and hearty, and whenpresented he held in his hand the fork that he hadswallowed. There was no symptom whatever of peri-tonitis, but immediately after the operation he was seizedwith jaundice, which lasted a few days. This was followedby a small abscess, which opened at the inferior part of thewound, but soon healed. No other untoward symptomoccurred, and at the end of three weeks after the operationthe man was able to get up and go about the garden ofthe hospital. There is evidently no adhesion between the.incision of the stomach and that of the abdominal parietes,as that organ can be felt moving freely in the peritonealcavity. The " suture perdue " was therefore a completesuccess, and reflects great credit on M. Polaillon, who per-formed the operation, and who was the first to employ thi&form of suture in such cases.

CYSTICERCI IN MUTTON.

M. Johannes Chatin, the newly-elected member and sonof Professor Chatin, then ascended the tribune, and read a.

paper on 11 Ladrerie " in sheep. Up till now the flesh of

sheep was considered, when eaten in a raw state, to be a&

dangerous as pork and beef, owing to the presence ofcysticerci in the muscular tissue. According to M. Chatin?however, there is nothing to be apprehended in eatingmutton raw, as, although the presence of cysticerci hasbeen established in the flesh of sheep, they are never foundin such numbers as to determine a veritable "ladrerie,"and, as they do not attain the development of the cysticerciof pigs and oxen, there is no danger of their transmission tathe human species. M. Chatin therefore concludes thatmutton in its raw state may be safely prescribed wheneversuch a form of treatment is indicated.

ABNORMAL PNEUMONIA.

Dr. Netter of Nancy related a case at the Congres&recently held at that town of an individual with a palustraldiathesis, who was suddenly seized with pneumonia, mostprobably of the same origin, for instead of following itsordinary course the malady presented a certain inter-mittence. Sulphate of quinine was prescribed by way oftrial, and a few days afterwards the patient was cured.The author thinks that in cases of abnormal pneumonia itwould be useful to examine the patient, not only morning andevening, but several times during the day, as any slight re-mission might pass away unperceived. If Dr. Netter hadnotexamined his patient during the febrile remission, he wouldnot have recognised the particular nature of the affection.

Paris, Oct. 5th. _______

THE SERVICES.

ADMIRALTY. — The following appointments have beenmade:-Staff Surgeon James Dunlop, to the Egeria; SurgeonAlexander F. Harper, to the Algerine; Surgeon Howard J. C.Todd, to the Ganges; Surgeon A. S. Nance, to the Swallow;and Deputy Inspector-General Francis W. Davies, to JamaicaHospital.RIFLE VOLUNTEERS.—1st Wiltshire: The following Sur-

geons are granted the honorary rank of Surgeon-Major:-G.C. Taylor, M.B., and F. F. Lee.

SCARLET FEVER EPIDEMIC IN DUNDEE.-No less than263 fresh cases of scarlet fever were reported to the sanitaryauthorities of Dundee during the month of September. Theyhave occurred principally in the more crowded parts of thetown, although no district has been entirely free of the

epidemic.