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  • Intuition and Intuition Development: Practices for the

    Inner Self

    by

    Emily Sadowski

    MA, University College London, 2009

    BA, University of Toronto, 2004

    Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the

    Requirements for the Degree of

    Doctor of Philosophy

    in the

    Curriculum Theory & Implementation: Philosophy of Education ProgramFaculty of Education

    Emily Sadowski

    SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY

    Fall 2017

    Copyright in this work rests with the author. Please ensure that any reproduction or re-use is

    done in accordance with the relevant national copyright legislation.

  • ii

    Approval

    Name:

    Degree:

    Title:

    Examining Committee:

    Date Defended/Approved:

    Emily Sadowski

    Doctor of Philosophy

    Intuition and Intuition Development: Practices for the Inner Self

    Chair: Allan MacKinnonAssociate Professor

    Charles BinghamSenior Supervisor Professor

    Sean BlenkinsopSupervisor Professor

    Heesoon BaiInternal Examiner Professor

    Alexander SidorkinExternal Examiner ProfessorCollege of EducationCalifornia State University Sacramento

    November 29, 2017

  • iii

    Abstract

    This project seeks to validate the kinds of intuitive experiences many people have, but

    which get subjugated, neglected, or rejected by institutions of knowledge. In particular, it

    responds to a scholarly silence about psychic, intuitive experiences like gut feelings, pre-

    cognition, and 'just knowing,' that are unexplained by hegemonic epistemological

    framing, which often (inadequately) explains intuition as expertise. Motivated by a desire

    to make these experiences sensible within an intellectual culture wedded to analysis and

    objective knowledge production, this research seeks to fill a gap in pedagogical practice

    in the area of understanding and supporting the intuitive function.

    Through a review of literature about intuition in philosophy and psychology, I recommend

    that intuition be conceptualized through an emergent psychological theory, transpersonal

    theory, that accounts for an extended range of inter-subjective and transpersonal

    consciousness. The dissertation then turns to the self-help realm, where a genre of

    intuition development books do the work of educating for intuition that formal educators

    have not. These books provide a framework for understanding intuition as a psychic

    sense, and recommend a programme of practice for educating the intuitive function.

    Intuition is presented as a relational, contextual way of knowing that relies on the

    coherence of the subject-knower, and the pedagogy for intuition directs practitioners

    towards transformative self-development.

    Drawing from Foucault's analysis of ancient practices of care of the self, I argue that the

    programme of practice for intuition development relies on a framework of the self as

    being both contingent (thus able to transform), and capable of experiencing connection

    to realms of non-ordinary and non-discursive consciousness. I suggest that the work to

    become more intuitive challenges the deceit of a subject's alienation from her context.

    Intuition development pedagogy contains contemplative and reflective practices that

    enables non-discursive and 'non'-ordinary experiences of consciousness. A similar

    programme may be a productive way forward to educating for intuition.

    Keywords: intuition; pedagogy; transformative development; Hermeneutics of the

    Subject; transpersonal psychology; consciousness

  • iv

    Dedication

    Dedicated to the Great Mother.

  • v

    Table of Contents

    Approval .......................................................................................................................................... ii

    Abstract .......................................................................................................................................... iii

    Dedication ...................................................................................................................................... iv

    Table of Contents .......................................................................................................................... v

    Chapter 1 Introduction ...................................................................................................1

    1.1 How I came to study 'intuition' .............................................................................................. 3

    1.2 The concept of intuition and its value to educational processes .................................... 7

    1.3 A greater context of alienation and decontextualization .................................................. 9

    1.4 Intuition development cultivates a 'way forward' from alienation .................................. 13

    1.5. Road map to the dissertation ............................................................................................ 17

    Chapter 2 Intuition: a disorderly concept .................................................................. 24

    2.1 Introducing the concept, intuition ....................................................................................... 24

    2.2 Five theorists on the function of intuition .......................................................................... 28

    2.2.1 Bergson .......................................................................................................................... 28

    2.2.2 Jung ................................................................................................................................ 30

    2.2.3 Bastick ............................................................................................................................ 32

    2.2.4 Noddings and Shore ..................................................................................................... 34

    2.2.5 Petitmengin-Peugeot .................................................................................................... 35

    2.2.6 Summary of this section .............................................................................................. 37

    2.3 Characteristics and correlates of the intuitive mode ....................................................... 38

    2.3.1 Flow & Gestalt ............................................................................................................... 39

    2.3.2 Certainty ......................................................................................................................... 42

    2.3.3 Intuition compared to insight ....................................................................................... 46

    2.3.4 Intuition in contrast to analysis .................................................................................... 48

    2.3.5 Summary of this section .............................................................................................. 50

    2.4 Origins of intuitive content .................................................................................................. 50

    2.4.1 Respectability politics and the unconscious ............................................................. 51

    2.4.2 The source of intuition as expertise: a predominant paradigm .............................. 54

    2.4.3 The source of intuition as instinctual knowledge: an untestable theory ............... 57

    2.4.4 The source of intuition as a (sixth) sense ................................................................. 60

    2.4.5. Framing intuition as psychic ....................................................................................... 62

    Chapter 3 An alternate conceptual space for intuition ............................................ 68

    3.1 The fruits of 'bookshelf inquiry' ........................................................................................... 68

    3.2 New Age, self-help books as educational texts ............................................................... 72

    3.3 The guidebooks' transpersonal framework for intuition .................................................. 78

    3.4 What the guidebooks teach - Intuition Development Pedagogy (IDP) ........................ 85

    3.5 Intuition Development Pedagogy is an educational programme .................................. 94

  • vi

    Chapter 4 Intuition, subjectivity and truth: developing an intuitive way of being 98

    4.1 'Things as they are': Unpacking an assumption that intuition is always true ............ 101

    4.2 Two lineages on truth, subjectivity, & the practice of philosophy ............................... 105

    4.3 'The subject must transform': IDP as a descendent of care of the self ...................... 110

    4.4 How the practices make intuition trustworthy: unpacking contemplative practice ... 116

    4.5 Caring for the self as ethical practice .............................................................................. 122

    4.6 IDP as transformative education: notes on an ongoing process ................................ 131

    Chapter 5 - Intuition development as soul shaping: an offering for education ..... 138

    5.1 The occlusion of intuition by an exclusionary epistemology ........................................ 138

    5.2 'Intuition' as an alternative to alienation .......................................................................... 144

    5.3 Implications of educating for intuition development ............