Introduction to Realism/Naturalism/Determinism The Rise of Realism: 1860-1914

  • View
    223

  • Download
    7

Embed Size (px)

Text of Introduction to Realism/Naturalism/Determinism The Rise of Realism: 1860-1914

  • Slide 1
  • Introduction to Realism/Naturalism/Determinism The Rise of Realism: 1860-1914
  • Slide 2
  • I. The American Renaissance: a giant shift towards humanism after the Civil War
  • Slide 3
  • Deism gave rise to Realism in literature Social Darwinism Intercontinental rail system & transcontinental telegraph Influx of immigrants 1860 to 1910
  • Slide 4
  • A. Farmers: 1860 to 1919 1860 1919 J.P. Morgan John D. Rockefeller
  • Slide 5
  • B. Millionaires: from 100 to 1,000 1860 1875
  • Slide 6
  • C. From Debtors to a Major World Power: 1860 - 1914 1860 1914
  • Slide 7
  • D. Small Town Mentality Shrinks The small town comfort and security gave way to an empty city life, displayed in the current literature
  • Slide 8
  • II. American Authors A.Stephen Crane Red Badge of Courage The Men in the Storm Open Boat
  • Slide 9
  • B. Jack London, Call of the Wild, To Build a Fire "The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time." - Jack London
  • Slide 10
  • III. Realism in literature - the harsh reality of life A. Life is Short: and then you die B. Survivors
  • Slide 11
  • IV. Sliding from Theism to Deism, to Romanticism/Naturalism Wm. Faulkner Ernest Hemmingway Stephen Crane John Steinbeck From Providence to Self-Reliance
  • Slide 12
  • We see the American understanding of God move from a personal experience to that of an impersonal force, to that of denial of the existence of God.
  • Slide 13
  • V. Frontier Humor and Regionalism Began in the 1830s: Casey Jones railway engineer Paul Bunyan giant logger Kit Carson Indian fighter Davy Crockett the scout
  • Slide 14
  • A. Local Colorists 1.Mark Twain Samuel Clemens 1835-1910
  • Slide 15
  • Huck Finn
  • Slide 16
  • 2. Bret Harte 1839-1902
  • Slide 17
  • VI. Naturalism/Realism/Determinism - Common Themes Found in Literary Plots a.The universe is unpredictable, spontaneous, and discontinuous. b.Our fate is determined by our environment, heredity, and chance. c.Free will is an illusion d.Life is a cruel joke
  • Slide 18
  • VII. More Realism Authors - Crane, London, and Henry James A philosophy of naturalism A literary expression of determinism
  • Slide 19
  • A. Stephen Crane (1871-1900) 1.Maggie: A Girl of the Streets A literary milestone in 1893
  • Slide 20
  • A. Stephen Crane (1871-1900) 2. The Red Badge of Courage
  • Slide 21
  • A. Stephen Crane (1871-1900) 3. Cranes Poetry A man said to the universe: "Sir, I exist!" "However," replied the universe, "The fact has not created in me A sense of obligation."
  • Slide 22
  • A. Stephen Crane (1871-1900) 4. The Open Boat based on a true experience from 1896
  • Slide 23
  • 4. The Open Boat Like Romanticism, naturalism/realism first appeared in Europe. It daringly opened up the worst of society with such topics as divorce, sex, adultery, poverty, and crime.
  • Slide 24
  • B. Samuel Clemens, Mark Twain (1835-1910), journalist, author, satirist All modern literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. Ernest Hemmingway
  • Slide 25
  • 1. His Style of Humor Deadpan humor Cigar White suit
  • Slide 26
  • 2. His Life and the Time he lived in The real West
  • Slide 27
  • 3. Vernacular and Tall Tales The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) Huckleberry Finn (1885)
  • Slide 28
  • 4. The motifs that are predictable in Twains writing are as follows; A.Vernacular B.Exaggeration C.Humor D.Deadpan narrator E.Unexplained appearance of a mysterious stranger.
  • Slide 29
  • 5. Mark Twain and God I am plenty safe enough in his hands; I am not in any danger from that kind of a Diety. The one that I want to keep out of the reach of, is the caricature of him which one finds in the Bible. We (that one and I) could never respect each other, never get along together. I have met his superior a hundred times-- in fact I amount to that myself. - Letter to Olivia Clemens, 7/17/1889