INTERNATIONAL CHEETAH Acinonyx jubatus STUDBOOK 2012 INTERNATIONAL CHEETAH (Acinonyx jubatus) STUDBOOK

  • View
    7

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

  • INTERNATIONAL CHEETAH

    (Acinonyx jubatus) STUDBOOK

    2012 Dr. Laurie Marker

    Cheetah Conservation Fund

  • 2012

    INTERNATIONAL CHEETAH (Acinonyx jubatus)

    STUDBOOK

    Compiled by:

    Dr. Laurie Marker International Cheetah Studbook Keeper

    Cheetah Conservation Fund Otjiwarongo, Namibia

    &

    Stephanie Cunningham Research Assistant

    Cheetah Conservation Fund

    Published by:

    Cheetah Conservation Fund P.O. Box 1755 Otjiwarongo

    Namibia

    December 2013

  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    The Studbook Keeper wishes to thank all the people and organizations that have assisted in the compilation of the studbook. The Studbook Keeper wishes to thank, in particular Stephanie Cunningham for entering and compiling the studbook data and processing studbook reports. In addition, the Studbook Keeper wishes to thank Lars Versteege, Patricia Tricorache and Laurie Bingaman-Lackey for their ongoing assistance in data cleanup and connecting previously unknown ISIS links with the Cheetah Studbook data. The Studbook Keeper also wishes to thank John Bowers for the cover art. The Studbook Keeper also wishes to thank the donors of the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) Namibia, USA and UK for their financial support that covers the majority of the costs involved in compiling, publishing and mailings.

  • Table of Contents

    Section A: A1-A16 Introduction A1-A3 2012 Studbook Information A3-A9 The Studbook A11 Registration Procedures A11 Registration A11 Additions to Inventory A12 Deletions from Inventory A12 Studbook Format A12-A13 Breeder Numbers Breeding Facility Abbreviations A14-A16 Section B: B1-B9 Summary of Changes in the 2012 Captive Population

    Section C: C1-C20 Summary of Cheetahs at Individual Facilities as of 31 December 2012

    Section D: D1-D15 Births in 2012

    Section E: E1-E2 Wild Caught in 2012

    Section F: F1-F17 Transfers during 2012

    Section G: G1-G19 Deaths in 2012

    Section H: H1-H4 Releases in 2012

    Section I: I1-I108 Live Animals on 31 December 2012

    Section J: J1-J49 Lost to Follow-up as of 31 December 2012

    Section K: K1-K783 Complete Studbook as of Publication Date, December 2013

    Section L: Appendix: CCF's Statement on Illegal Cheetah Trafficking, Sep. 2013

    Illegal Cheetah Trafficking Case Reports: Africa (Origin and Transit Countries) Illegal Cheetah Trafficking Case Reports: Arabian Peninsula (Consumer Countries) CCF's Official Statement Regarding Illegal Wildlife Trade

    Section M: Cheetah Conservation Fund, Namibia: Annual Report 2012

  • Section A: Introduction

  • A1

    Introduction The 2012 International Cheetah Studbook is the twenty-second edition of the world registry for captive cheetah. This edition of the International Cheetah Studbook combines all information available for the period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2012. The captive cheetah population on 31 December 2012 was 1661 (858.798.5) animals in 250 known facilities in 44 countries. The captive cheetah population lives in eight geographical regions. Figure 1 shows the percentage of cheetah living in these regions as of the end of 2012. Table 1 is a breakdown of the eight regions by country and included the number of facilities and the number of cheetah in each country for 2012. The Studbook includes the major changes in the captive population from 1 January 2012 through 31 December 2012 (Section B). In Section B, the 2011 numbers have been changed from last years studbook due to reports received after the 2011 publication date. There are 9 (6.3.0) cheetahs in private facilities where the final destination was not submitted to the studbook keeper and are therefore listed only as private. Many of these animals become Lost to Follow-up (LTF). Over the years, there have been 568 (307.254.7) animals that have become LTF. These animals have been deleted from the live Studbook, and are listed in Section J. Section C is a summary of the captive cheetah population, by studbook number, at individual facilities as of 31 December 2012. Also included in this edition are births (Section D), wild-caught individuals (Section E), transfers (Section F), deaths (Section G) and releases (Section H) for the year 2012. Section I is a Studbook listing of all live animals as of 31 December 2012 and Section K is a full Studbook listing of the 8289 (4019.3781.489) live, dead and LTF cheetahs registered up until December 2013, the date of publication of the 2012 International Cheetah Studbook.

    Figure 1. 2012 Captive Cheetah Population by Region, 1661 (858.798.5) Cheetahs

    Northern Africa/Middle East

    10% Australia/New Zealand

    3%

    Southern Africa 31%

    Private/Unknown 1%

    Europe 20%

    India/Far East 8%

    United Kingdom/Ireland

    6%

    Central & South

    America 0%

    North America 21%

  • A2

    Table 1. 2012 Captive Population by Region and Country, 1661 (858.798.5) Cheetahs Region Country Facilities M F U Total Australia/New Zealand

    Australia 8 18 16 0 34 New Zealand 4 15 3 0 18

    12 33 19 0 52

    2012 - 2 Countries, 12 Facilities, 52 (33.19.0)

    Central & South America

    Argentina 1 0 1 0 1 Mexico 1 0 1 0 1

    2 0 2 0 2

    2012 - 2 Countries, 2 Facilities, 2 (0.2.0)

    Europe Austria 4 7 2 0 9

    Belgium 4 6 2 0 8

    Croatia 1 1 0 0 1

    Czech Republic 5 11 6 0 17

    Denmark 1 10 6 0 16

    France 19 36 46 0 82

    Germany 20 31 33 0 64

    Greece 1 1 3 0 4

    Hungary 2 5 1 0 6

    Italy 5 9 8 0 17

    Kazakhstan 1 1 1 0 2

    Netherlands 5 14 15 0 29

    Poland 5 8 8 0 16

    Portugal 2 7 5 0 12

    Russia 2 5 6 0 11

    Spain 4 4 6 0 10

    Sweden 2 14 8 0 22

    Switzerland 1 2 1 0 3

    Ukraine 1 1 1 0 2

    85 173 158 0 331

    2012 - 19 Countries, 85 Facilities, 331 (173.158.0)

    India/Far East China 1 1 1 0 2

    India 3 7 5 0 12

    Indonesia 2 6 8 0 14

    Japan 9 52 52 3 107

    Singapore 1 1 2 0 3

    South Korea 1 1 2 0 3

    17 68 70 3 141

    2012 - 6 Countries, 17 Facilities, 141 (68.70.3)

    United Kingdom/Ireland

    England 15 42 43 0 85 Ireland 1 5 5 0 10

    Northern Ireland 1 1 1 0 2

    17 48 49 0 97

    2012 - 3 Countries, 17 Facilities, 97 (48.49.0)

  • A3

    North America Canada 3 16 12 1 29

    United States 67 150 165 0 315

    70 166 177 1 344

    2012 - 2 Countries, 70 Facilities, 344 (166.177.1)

    Northern Africa/Middle East

    Ethiopia 1 5 4 0 9 Israel 2 0 2 0 2 Morocco 1 2 1 0 3

    Qatar 1 3 3 0 6

    Tunisia 1 1 0 0 1

    United Arab Emirates 6 86 60 0 146

    Yemen 1 1 1 0 2

    13 98 71 0 169

    2012 - 7 Countries, 13 Facilities, 169 (98.71.0)

    Southern Africa Namibia 11 86 82 1 169

    South Africa 22 171 165 0 336

    Zambia 1 6 3 0 9

    34 263 250 1 514

    2012 - 3 Countries, 34 Facilities, 514 (263.250.1)

    Private/Unknown

    Private ? 6 3 0 9

    Unknown ? 1 1 0 2

    2012 - Unknown Number of Countries and Facilities, 11 (7.4.0)

    2012 Studbook Information From 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2012, 408 (200.186.22) new animals were registered, representing births (Section D) and newly imported wild-caught animals (Section E) during this period, as well as animals that had been brought into he captive population prior to 1 January 2012, but the Studbook Keeper did not received notification until after the publication of the 2011 Studbook. Of the new additions, 223 (102.104.17) were births, and 16 (5.10.1) animals were wild caught and transferred to 3 known and 1 unknown facilities in Namibia, and 1 facility in Ethiopia. There were 169 (93.72.4) late registries. Of these, 110 (59.47.4) were captive born, 49 were wild-caught (28.21.0), and 10 (6.4.0) were of unknown origin. Many of these 169 cheetahs were historic animals, and therefore only 108 (61.47.0) of these are still alive in the 2012 captive population. The captive cheetah population on 31 December 2012 was 1661 (858.798.5) animals in 250 known facilities in 44 countries, in addition to an unknown number of private facilities. Of the 1661 animals, 83.32% or 1384 (710.670.4) are captive-born and 14.63% or 243 (129.113.1) are wild born (Figure 2). The origin of 34 (19.15), or 2.05%, animals are unknown. Five animals of unknown sex were not included in Figure 2, as well as 28 animals of unknown age.

  • A4

    Figure 2. Age/Sex Structure of the 2012 Captive Cheetah Population for Wild-born (WB), Captive-born (CB) and Unknown Birth Type (UB) Animals Successful parentage was reported in 2012 with animals as young as 2.6 years old and as old as 13.66 years. The majority of successful breeding for both sexes occurs between 3 and 10 years of age. The data are relevant in assessing the age structure of the 2012 population. As shown in Figure 2, 57.80%, or 960 (514.446) animals, of the 2012 population is within the prime breeding age bracket (3-10 years of age). Of the animals in this age bracket, 12.6% or 121 (69.52) are wild born. The percentage of sub-adult animals (0 10) totaled 12.34% or 205 (101.104), of which 37.07% or 76 (39.37) are wild-born. During 2012, 223 (102.104.17) cubs were born in 65 litters in 33 facilities in 15 countries (see section F). Table 2 lists these litters of cubs and facilities. These births represent an increase in productivity from 2011, when 172 cubs were born. In addition, 2012 has had the highest number of captive b