INNOvATIONS ... language teaching (ELT), and to stimulate new thinking and experimentation, by providing

  • View
    0

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of INNOvATIONS ... language teaching (ELT), and to stimulate new thinking and experimentation, by...

  • Innovations in pre-service education and training for English language teachers Edited by Julian Edge and Steve Mann

    INNOvATIONS SERIES

  • Innovations in pre-service education and training for English language teachers Edited by Julian Edge and Steve Mann

  • ISBN 978-0-86355-702-6

    © British Council 2013 Brand and Design/C442 10 Spring Gardens London SW1A 2BN, UK

    www.britishcouncil.org

  • Contents | 1

    Contents Foreword ......................................................................................................................................................3

    Overview – Innovation as action new-in-context: an introduction to the PRESETT collection Steve Mann and Julian Edge .................................................................................................................5

    Innovations in PRESETT

    1 Providing ‘the spark’ for reflection from a digital platform Nur Kurto©lu-Hooton ................................................................................................................... 17

    2 Formative assessment for a pedagogy of success Mawa Samb .....................................................................................................................................33

    3 IMMERSE: an institutional approach to pre- and early-service teacher development Leonardo A Mercado ...................................................................................................................47

    4 Borrowing the use of ethnographic notes from the social sciences for classroom observation in central Mexico Martha Lengeling ..........................................................................................................................63

    5 Fostering collaborative conversations between pre-service trainees and serving teachers through supervisory role plays Bob Oprandy with Robyn Addington, Chris Brown and Michelle Rutter ................... 81

    6 Cultivating expertise in materials design in pre-service English teacher education Xiaotang Cheng .............................................................................................................................99

    7 Communication skills: a blended learning approach for pre-service teachers Linda M Hanington and Mary Ellis ......................................................................................... 115

    8 Top Tips: a model for participant-led, shared learning Lesley Dick .....................................................................................................................................133

    9 A course on continuing professional development Nikki Ashcraft and Sally Ali ......................................................................................................147

    10 A shadowing experience for TEFL student teachers Besime Erkmen ............................................................................................................................163

    11 iCorpus: making corpora meaningful for pre-service teacher education Alev Özbilgin and Steve Neufeld ...........................................................................................181

  • Foreword | 32 | Contents

    12 Using the European Portfolio for Student Teachers of Languages (EPOSTL) to scaffold reflective teacher learning in English language teacher education Sylvia Velikova ..............................................................................................................................201

    13 Beyond theory and practice: introducing praxis in pre-service language teacher education Eline van Batenburg .................................................................................................................. 217

    14 ‘Being there?’: comparing synchronous and recorded online instruction for language teachers Jo Gakonga ................................................................................................................................. 231

  • Foreword | 3

    Foreword Adrian Odell

    The British Council is pleased to offer this volume in our ‘Innovations in…’ series. The series aims to bring to the reader a wealth of ideas and practices in English language teaching (ELT), and to stimulate new thinking and experimentation, by providing accounts of innovative experiences from a range of international contexts.

    The focus of this volume is on the pre-service education and training (PRESETT) of English language teachers. In terms of research conducted, articles written, and the circulation of new ideas, PRESETT tends to be a neglected area within the wider field of ELT. Far more is written about in-service education and training (INSETT). We hope that this volume will contribute to a redressing of that imbalance.

    PRESETT is clearly of importance. National governments dedicate considerable financial and human resources to it, and school education systems should be able to count on the expertise and fresh ideas of new teachers emerging from initial training courses. We hope that this book will afford an opportunity for the sharing of such fresh ideas within and between national education practitioners and systems.

    There exists a certain danger in PRESETT that initial training can be seen as providing an approved, finished model of teaching. This can mean that continuing professional development (CPD) has to bear an extra burden when it comes to introducing new approaches in the classroom for practising teachers. Furthermore, a newly qualified teacher moving into the public sector education system following a university course may well have been exposed to more theory than practice. Also, the pedagogy of his or her lecturers may not have modelled flexible, student-centred approaches. The collection should help educators to address such issues.

    We, the British Council, are delighted to offer you this volume, which brings together a truly international set of fresh perspectives and experiences. We hope they will be of real interest and practical value to anyone involved in teacher education and training.

    Finally, I would like to express our thanks to our editors, Steve Mann and Julian Edge, and to all of those who have written papers for this publication.

    Adrian Odell, Adviser, English and Examinations British Council

  • Overview | 54 | Foreword

  • Overview | 5

    Overview – Innovation as action new-in-context: an introduction to the PRESETT collection Steve Mann and Julian Edge

    When we invited proposals for inclusion in this collection of papers on the pre-service education and training of English language teachers (henceforth PRESETT), we received 141 responses from 32 different countries. The selection process was very difficult. Some criteria, however, were clear from the outset.

    First, to count as an innovation, we needed reports on action that had actually been taken. A new idea is not an innovation. Innovation demands concentration on process; it demands that we pay as much attention to how we teach or train as to which topics get covered along the way, or the tools that we employ. We asked contributors to make clear the steps and detail of introduction, implementation and evaluation of their efforts, because it is the realisation of an idea in action that constitutes genuine innovation.

    Second, whether action counts as innovation depends on where and when that action is taken. We have hyphenated new-in-context in the title of this chapter in order to emphasise the importance of setting, of time and place, of norms and expectations. In a situation where learning is seen as the memorisation of facts to be tested by an end-of-year examination, for example, the introduction of formative assessment would be seen as an innovation. Conversely, in a setting where learning modules and criterion-referenced, continuous assessment are the norm, the introduction of assessment by end-of-year written examinations of formal knowledge would be an innovation. Samb’s chapter (Chapter 2) in this collection gives us insight into the former type of innovation in Senegal. At the time of writing, the British government seems to be moving in the opposite direction in England (BBC 2012).

    A third criterion, centrally important in the work of teacher-educators, is a commitment to practising what we preach. We see it as incongruent that:

    … while teacher educators promote reflection among teachers, they seem to have less tendency to consider reflection as a method for their own practice.

    (Moon 1999: 57)

    Part of such necessary reflection involves considering the perspectives of our teacher-trainees. Put quite simply:

  • 6 | Overview Overview | 7

    … as we implement innovations in our own programs, courses, and teaching strategies, we need to find out how teacher learners respond to these innovations, and how they affect teachers’ practices.

    (Johnson and Irujo 2001: 07)

    In addition, such reflection requires teacher educators to ask reflexively of themselves, ‘What has this innovation contributed to my own development?’ Motivated by the same set of attitudes that underpinned the series of International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language (IATEFL) conferences and publications appearing under the banner of Teachers Develop Teachers Research (beginning with Edge and Richards 1993), we asked authors in this collection, ‘not to talk about [innov