Infectious Disease and Basic Microbiological Mechanisms ... ?· Infectious Disease and Basic Microbiological…

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  • Infectious Disease and Basic Microbiological Mechanisms Training Grant

    List of Current Mentors

    Laurie E. Comstock, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Medicine (Microbiology and Immunobiology), Harvard Medical School.

    Symbiotic relationships among intestinal bacteria: Dr. Comstocks laboratory studies the basic biology of predominant bacteria that inhabit the human intestine, including how members of the intestinal microbiota establish and maintain symbiotic relationships. Dr. Comstock has mentored one predoctoral and 7 postdoctoral trainees and has collaborated with Drs. Kasper, Lory, and Pier.

    Joseph El Khoury, M.D., is Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

    Macrophages and microglia in infection, host defense, and neurodegeneration: Dr. El Khourys laboratory studies the role of macrophages and microglia in host response to inflammation, neurodegeneration, and the pathogens S. aureus andCryptococcus neoformans. Dr. El Khoury, a past trainee on this T32 (2000-2001), has been the recipient of an American Health Assistance Foundation Alzheimers Disease Research Award (2004), an American Federation for Medical Research Junior Physician Investigator Award (2002), and an American Society of Transplantation Trainee Award (2001). He has mentored one predoctoral and 3 postdoctoral trainees and has collaborated with Drs. Calderwood, Vyas, and Warren. Dr. El Khoury is a new mentor on this T32, bringing expertise in inflammation and host defense.

    Sarah Fortune, M.D., is the Melvin J. and Geraldine L. Glimcher Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health.

    Interactions of M. tuberculosis with the host: Using high throughput proteomics and genetic approaches, Dr. Fortunes laboratory focuses on how M. tuberculosis uses specialized secretion systems, such as ESX1, and surface structures to mediate interactions with the host and enable persistence in the host, and on how M. tuberculosis varies, genetically and/or epigenetically, during the course of individual infection. Dr. Fortune has been the recipient of a Burroughs Wellcome Foundation Investigator award in Pathogenesis of Infectious Diseases (2012), a Doris Duke Clinical Scientist Development Award (2010), a PopTech Science and Public Leadership Fellowship (2010), a New Innovator Award from the NIH (2007), and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Early Career Award (2007). She has mentored five predoctoral and nine postdoctoral trainees and has collaborated with Drs. Behar, Lipsitch, Murray, Rubin, Ryan, and Waldor. Dr. Fortune is a new mentor on this T32, bringing expertise in proteomic approaches, genetics, and epigenetics to the field of tuberculosis.

    Wendy S. Garrett, M.D., Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases (Genetics and Complex Diseases), Harvard School of Public Health.

    Interactions of intestinal microbiota and the immune system in inflammatory bowel disease: Dr. Garretts laboratory uses mouse models to study how members of the Enterobacteriaceae can drive chronic intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease, focusing on interactions in the intestinal microbiota and with the host. Dr. Garrett has been the recipient of the Searle Scholars Award (2011), the Cancer Research Institute Investigator Award (2010), a V Foundation Scholar award (2008), a Burroughs Wellcome Career in Medical Sciences Award (2008), and a Damon Runyon Fellowship (2006-2009). She has mentored three predoctoral and five postdoctoral trainees. She is a new mentor on this T32, bringing expertise in microbiota.

  • Michael S. Gilmore, Ph.D., is the Sir William Osler Professor of Ophthalmology (Microbiology and Immunobiology), Harvard Medical School.

    Molecular biology of multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens: With the goal of developing new ways to prevent and treat antibiotic resistant infections, the Gilmore laboratory investigates traits on mobile elements in enterococci and staphylococci that destabilize the natural host-commensal relationship. Dr. Gilmore, a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, has been the recipient of the Lew R. Wasserman Merit Award from Research to Prevent Blindness (1997) and the University of Oklahoma Regents Award for Superior Research and Creative Activity (1996). He has mentored 12 predoctoral and 26 postdoctoral trainees and has collaborated with Drs. Calderwood, Hooper, Hung, and Walker. Recruited to Harvard in 2004, Dr. Gilmore is a new mentor on this T32, bringing expertise in the area of gram-positive bacterial pathogenesis and antimicrobial resistance.

    Darren E. Higgins, Ph.D., is Professor of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School.

    Molecular determinants of intracellular bacterial pathogenesis: Dr. Higgins laboratorys studies the mechanisms of coordinate regulation of bacterial gene expression, host factors required for disease, and protective cellular immune responses that may enable vaccine development in infection by the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Dr. Higgins has been the recipient of an A. W. Baldwin Charitable Foundation Award (2011), a Cox Entrepreneurial Research Award from Harvard University (2008), a Charles E. W. Grinnell Fund for Medical Research Award (2008), a National Science Foundation Career Advancement Award (2007), the Hellman Family Faculty Award from Harvard University (2002), the Giovanni Armenise-Harvard Foundation Research Award (2000), and the William F. Milton Award from Harvard University (2000). Dr. Higgins has mentored 10 predoctoral and 9 postdoctoral trainees and has collaborated with Drs. Lesser and Rubin.

    David C. Hooper, M.D., is Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

    Molecular mechanisms and epidemiology of antibiotic resistance: Dr. Hoopers research program focuses on quinolone resistance in S. aureus and gram-negative bacteria and the determinants of antibiotic use and infection prevention that affect multidrug resistance. He is the recipient of a MERIT Award from NIH, is a past President of the American Society for Microbiology (2011) and Chair of the Program Committee of the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (2003-2007), and is Chief, Infection Control Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital. He has mentored 26 postdoctoral fellows and was Fellowship Program Director, Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital from 1994 to 2008. He has collaborated with Drs. Calderwood, Gilmore, Lee, Platt, Ryan, Walensky, Walker, and Warren.

    Deborah T. Hung, M.D., Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunobiology and of Molecular Biology, Harvard Medical School, and Assistant Professor, Infectious Disease Program, Broad Institute.

    Chemical genetics approach to bacterial pathogenesis: The Hung laboratory merges the powerful fields of chemical biology and bacterial genetics/genomics to the study of infectious diseases, focusing on the in vivo phenotypes of Vibrio cholerae,Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and M. tuberculosis. Dr. Hung has been the recipient of a Kavli Fellowship from the National Academy of Sciences (2009), a Merck Irving S. Sigal Memorial Award from the American Society of Microbiology (2009), a Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Clinician Scientist Award (2008), a Pew Scholars Award in the Biomedical Sciences (2007), a Maxwell Finland Award for Research Excellence in Infectious Diseases from the Massachusetts Infectious Diseases Society (2006), and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellowship for Physician-Scientists (2001-2004). She has mentored seven predoctoral and 15 postdoctoral

  • trainees and has collaborated with Drs. Gilmore, Lipsitch, Lory, Mekalanos, Murray, Rubin, Ryan, and Walker. Dr. Hung is a new mentor on this T32, bringing expertise in chemical genetic approaches to the study of pathogenesis.

    Dennis L. Kasper, M.D., is the William Ellery Channing Professor of Medicine and Professor of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School.

    Bacterial-host interactions in symbiosis and pathogenesis: With the goal of generating insights that will lead to new preventive or therapeutic interventions, Dr. Kaspers group is studying the molecular, chemical, and genetic basis for the interactions of the immune system with bacteria and with important bacterial components, particularly capsular polysaccharides and surface or secreted proteins, focusing on the anaerobic gram-negative organism Bacteroides fragilis, and Francisella tularensis, a potential agent of bioterrorism. Dr. Kasper is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, has mentored two predoctoral and 73 postdoctoral trainees, and has collaborated with Drs. Comstock, Lee, Pier, Platt, Ryan, and Waldor.

    Kenneth M. Kaye, M.D., is Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8) pathogenesis: Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is predominantly latent in the host and has a causative role in Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphomas, and multicentric Castleman's disease. Dr. Kayes group is investigating how latency-associated nuclear antigen mediates viral episome persistence, with the goal of enabling the development of strategies that interrupt latency and lead to prevention and treatment of infection-associated tumors. Dr. Kaye has been elected to membership in the American Society for Clinical Investigation. He has mentored nine predoctoral and 17 postdoctoral trainees and has collaborated with Drs. Kieff, Platt, and Wang.

    Elliott Kieff, M.D., Ph.D., is the Albee Professor of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School.

    Molecular pathogenesis of Epstein Barr herpesvirus infection: Dr. Kieffs labo