1
AJIC Volume 29, Number 1 Irani-Hakime et al 23 tries and other world regions in view of the apparently contradictory results reported. For example, some studies reported that the prevalence of HCV was sig- nificantly higher than in the blood donors or the gen- eral population, 8,9 and others demonstrated that the occupational risk of HCV infection was low among health care personnel. 11-13 This apparent contradiction may be due to the sensitivity of the assays adopted in earlier studies or poor quality control measures. The low prevalence rate of anti-HCV antibody among health care workers reported here demon- strates that the occupational risk of HCV infection was low in the St Georges Hospital health care personnel. Results obtained are encouraging in that no significant occupational transmission of HCV was likely among our hospital staff. However, this finding should not lead to complacency because the risk of HCV trans- mission remains a potential occupational risk. 14,15 References 1. Choo QL, Kuo G, Weiner AJ, Overby LR, Bradley DW, Houghton M. Isolation of a cDNA clone derived from a blood-borne non-A, non-B viral hepatitis genome. Science 1989;244:359-62. 2. Alter MJ. The detection, transmission, and outcome of hepatitis C virus infection. Infect Agents Dis 1993;2:155-66. 3. Tong MJ, El-Farra NS, Reikes AR, Co RL. Clinical outcomes after transfusion-associated hepatitis C. N Engl J Med 1995;332:1463-6. 4. Shakil AO, Conry-Cantilena C, Alter HJ, Hayashi P, Kleiner DE, Tedeschi V, et al. Volunteer blood donors with antibody to hepati- tis C virus: clinical, biochemical, virologic, and histologic fea- tures. Ann Intern Med 1995;123:330-7. 5. Shrestha SM, Shrestha DM, Gafney TE, Maharjan KG, Tsuda F, Okamoto H. Hepatitis B and C infection among drug abusers in Nepal. Trop Gastroenterology 1996;17:212-3. 6. De Lamballerie X, Olmer M, Bouchouareb D, Zandotti C, De Micco P. Nosocomial transmission of hepatitis C virus in hemodialysis patients. J Med Virol 1996;49:296-302. 7. Stroffolini T, Marzolini A, Palumbo F, Novaco F, Moiraghi A, Balocchini E, et al. Incidence of non-A, non-B and HCV positive hepatitis in healthcare workers in Italy. J Hosp Infect 1996;33:131-7. 8. Mitsui T, Iwano K, Masuko K. Hepatitis C virus infection in medical personnel after needlestick accident. Hepatol 1992;16: 1109-14. 9. Kiyosawa K, Sodeyama T, Tanaka E. Hepatitis C in hospital employ- ees with needlestick injuries. Ann Intern Med 1991;115:367-9. 10. Jadoul M, El Akrout M, Cornu C, van Ypersele de Strihou C. Prevalence of hepatitis C antibodies in health-care workers. Lancet 1994;344:339. 11. Struve J, Aronsson B, Frenning B, Forsgren M, Weiland O. Prevalence of antibodies against hepatitis C virus infection among health care workers in Stockholm. Scand J Gastroenterol 1994;29:360-2. 12. Zuckerman J, Clewley G, Griffiths P, Cockroft A. Prevalence of hepatitis C antibodies in clinical health-care workers. Lancet 1994;343:1618-20. 13. Nakashima K, Kashiwagi S, Hayashi J, Noguchi A, Hirata M, Ikeda S, et al. Low prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection among hospital staff and acupuncturists in Kyushu, Japan. J Infect 1993;26:17-25. 14. Yazdanpanah Y, Boelle PY, Carrat F, Guiguet M, Abiteboul D, Valleron AJ. Risk of hepatitis C virus transmission to surgeons and nurses from infected patients: model-based estimates in France. J Hepatol 1999;30:765-9. 15. Mizokami M. Study of needlestick accidents and hepatitis C infection in healthcare workers by molecular evolutionary analy- sis. J Hosp Infect 1997;35:149-54. In Memoriam APIC announces the death of Jean R. Vandermade, RN, at her home in Fort Myers, Fla, on Sunday, November 26, 2000. Jean was a member of the original steering committee that founded APIC in 1972. She served on the APIC Board of Directors, taught the CDC Course 1200G for many years, and then acted as moderator when it became the APIC Infection Control and Epidemiology (ICE I) course. She contributed to many committees and task forces and shaped the field of infection con- trol. Contributions in Jean’s memory may be made to the Jean R. Vandermade Fund of the Research Foundation, 1275 K St NW, Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20005-4006. Contributions will be directed to the General Fund of the Research Foundation. This fund is used for supporting research that will serve the profession and improve the quality of health care worldwide. Your con- tributions are tax deductible and will be formally acknowledged by the Foundation.

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Page 1: In Memoriam

AJIC

Volume 29, Number 1 Irani-Hakime et al 23

tries and other world regions in view of the apparentlycontradictory results reported. For example, somestudies reported that the prevalence of HCV was sig-nificantly higher than in the blood donors or the gen-eral population,8,9 and others demonstrated that theoccupational risk of HCV infection was low amonghealth care personnel.11-13 This apparent contradictionmay be due to the sensitivity of the assays adopted inearlier studies or poor quality control measures.

The low prevalence rate of anti-HCV antibodyamong health care workers reported here demon-strates that the occupational risk of HCV infection waslow in the St Georges Hospital health care personnel.Results obtained are encouraging in that no significantoccupational transmission of HCV was likely amongour hospital staff. However, this finding should notlead to complacency because the risk of HCV trans-mission remains a potential occupational risk.14,15

References1. Choo QL, Kuo G, Weiner AJ, Overby LR, Bradley DW, Houghton

M. Isolation of a cDNA clone derived from a blood-borne non-A,non-B viral hepatitis genome. Science 1989;244:359-62.

2. Alter MJ. The detection, transmission, and outcome of hepatitisC virus infection. Infect Agents Dis 1993;2:155-66.

3. Tong MJ, El-Farra NS, Reikes AR, Co RL. Clinical outcomes aftertransfusion-associated hepatitis C. N Engl J Med 1995;332:1463-6.

4. Shakil AO, Conry-Cantilena C, Alter HJ, Hayashi P, Kleiner DE,Tedeschi V, et al. Volunteer blood donors with antibody to hepati-tis C virus: clinical, biochemical, virologic, and histologic fea-tures. Ann Intern Med 1995;123:330-7.

5. Shrestha SM, Shrestha DM, Gafney TE, Maharjan KG, Tsuda F,Okamoto H. Hepatitis B and C infection among drug abusers inNepal. Trop Gastroenterology 1996;17:212-3.

6. De Lamballerie X, Olmer M, Bouchouareb D, Zandotti C, DeMicco P. Nosocomial transmission of hepatitis C virus inhemodialysis patients. J Med Virol 1996;49:296-302.

7. Stroffolini T, Marzolini A, Palumbo F, Novaco F, Moiraghi A,Balocchini E, et al. Incidence of non-A, non-B and HCV positivehepatitis in healthcare workers in Italy. J Hosp Infect 1996;33:131-7.

8. Mitsui T, Iwano K, Masuko K. Hepatitis C virus infection inmedical personnel after needlestick accident. Hepatol 1992;16:1109-14.

9. Kiyosawa K, Sodeyama T, Tanaka E. Hepatitis C in hospital employ-ees with needlestick injuries. Ann Intern Med 1991;115:367-9.

10. Jadoul M, El Akrout M, Cornu C, van Ypersele de Strihou C.Prevalence of hepatitis C antibodies in health-care workers. Lancet1994;344:339.

11. Struve J, Aronsson B, Frenning B, Forsgren M, Weiland O.Prevalence of antibodies against hepatitis C virus infectionamong health care workers in Stockholm. Scand J Gastroenterol1994;29:360-2.

12. Zuckerman J, Clewley G, Griffiths P, Cockroft A. Prevalence ofhepatitis C antibodies in clinical health-care workers. Lancet1994;343:1618-20.

13. Nakashima K, Kashiwagi S, Hayashi J, Noguchi A, Hirata M,Ikeda S, et al. Low prevalence of hepatitis C virus infectionamong hospital staff and acupuncturists in Kyushu, Japan. JInfect 1993;26:17-25.

14. Yazdanpanah Y, Boelle PY, Carrat F, Guiguet M, Abiteboul D,Valleron AJ. Risk of hepatitis C virus transmission to surgeonsand nurses from infected patients: model-based estimates inFrance. J Hepatol 1999;30:765-9.

15. Mizokami M. Study of needlestick accidents and hepatitis Cinfection in healthcare workers by molecular evolutionary analy-sis. J Hosp Infect 1997;35:149-54.

In Memoriam

APIC announces the death of Jean R. Vandermade, RN, at her home in Fort Myers, Fla, on Sunday,November 26, 2000. Jean was a member of the original steering committee that founded APIC in1972. She served on the APIC Board of Directors, taught the CDC Course 1200G for many years,and then acted as moderator when it became the APIC Infection Control and Epidemiology (ICE I)course. She contributed to many committees and task forces and shaped the field of infection con-trol. Contributions in Jean’s memory may be made to the Jean R. Vandermade Fund of theResearch Foundation, 1275 K St NW, Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20005-4006. Contributions willbe directed to the General Fund of the Research Foundation. This fund is used for supportingresearch that will serve the profession and improve the quality of health care worldwide. Your con-tributions are tax deductible and will be formally acknowledged by the Foundation.