Ignite Magazine Issue 1

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The premiere issue of IgniteSJ, Saint John sports publication

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<ul><li><p>your passion for local sports</p><p>U14Boys/girls Soccer</p><p>Midget aaa vitos</p><p>little boyneeds ourhelp</p><p>dawn of a new ice age</p><p>wina guided fishing tour</p><p>Issue 1 Volume 1</p><p>SJ</p><p>frontCover2Backup.indd 1 10/27/2010 10:14:27 AM</p></li><li><p>Third Eye SecurityThird Eye Security</p><p>Proud Supporter of the Dieppe CommandosSupporting community teamwork</p><p> www.3rdeyesecurity.ca 3rdeye@nb.sympatico.ca </p><p>Above all else we care about your security</p><p>Oce: 506-387-2087Cell: 506-874-3326</p></li><li><p>Issue 1</p><p>Inside</p><p>Coles Story Page 7A boy in need of our help Meet the Thunder!!! Page 8</p><p>KV Slammers Page 12meet Sara</p><p>Fishing - What you didn't know Page 16 </p><p>Midget AAA</p><p>Golf: Starting position Page 6</p><p>MFL Page 10</p><p>U14 Boys/Girls Soccer Page 14 </p><p>Dawn of a new ice age Page 17 Fog City Rollers page Page 18 Regional Running Page 21 </p><p>Ignite sjIgnite your passion for local sports</p><p>Ignite SJ is Saint Johns source for every kind of local sport from hockey and baseball to fishing and golf. It is an all encompassing sports magazine that will grab not just sports fans but our entire community.</p><p>The Production Team:Charles Teed, Contributing Writer/Running ColumnDuncan Mayberry, Golf ColumnHenry Arsenault, Fishing ColumnBrigitte Gionet, Graphic Design/LayoutAlicia Delong, Graphic Design/LayoutInformative Computer SolutionsWeb Design/PhotographyLisa Thorsteinson, AdministrationFred Little, Account Manager</p><p>If you would like to submit an idea for a local sports story, or would like to give feedback please contact any of the following:</p><p>Eric Durant: eric@innovationsnb.caDanny Mclaughlin: danny@innovationsnb.caLisa Thorsteinson: lisa@innovationsnb.ca </p><p>Vitos </p><p>Number 1!Congratulations to the publishers on the premiere edition of Ignite SJ, Greater Saint Johns first and only magazine for local sports. Saint John has a very active sport community, from our much loved Seadogs and new Millrats basketball team, to our local community centre cheerleaders. IgniteSJ promises to capture and celebrate our citys love of sports and to recognize the many athletes, coaches, parents, volunteers and loyal fans who dedicate their time and passion to their sport.</p><p>SAINT JOHN</p><p>No. 1!Flicitations aux diteurs du premier numro de la revue Ignite SJ, la premire et la seule revue consacre aux sports locaux dans la rgion de Saint John. Il existe Saint John une collectivit sportive trs active, de lquipe de hockey bien aime les Seadogs, aux nouvelles quipes de basketball de la ligue Millrats, en passant par les majorettes des diffrents centres communautaires. IgniteSJ promet de capter et dhonorer notre amour des sports et de rendre hommage aux divers athltes, entraneurs, parents, bnvoles et partisans qui consacrent leurs heures et leur passion au sport. </p></li><li><p>When minor hockey teams make the news, the stories often take a negative slant. On ice brawls, unscrupulous coaches, and overbearing parents often take focus away from the game itself, leaving those unfamiliar with the sport with a bad taste in their mouths. Forget the fact that hundreds of coaches and thousands of children participate in the sport across the country each year; one nationally publicized ght ruins the whole bunch, and overshadows every personal and team victory our unof cial national sport has to offer. </p><p>Ken Dobson is working hard to place a positive face on Saint John minor hockey. The head of the Saint John Vitos Major Midget hockey team, Dobson not only strives to develop top notch hockey players, but community leaders as well. Some of the 15 to 17 year old high school students will use their time with the Vitos as a stepping stone to pro, semi-pro or university hockey, but all of the players that join the team will learn intangible skills that help them develop into mature, responsible adults. </p><p>A long-time youth hockey coach, Dobson helmed Team New Brunswick at the 2007 Canada Winter Games, and also worked with the under-17 and under-16 New Brunswick teams at the 2006 and 2005 Atlantic Challenge Cup, respectively. Dobson re-joined the Vitos after the departure of coach Jeff LeBlanc earlier this year (he was an assistant coach for the team in 2006-2007), and is committed to preparing his players for the next step in their hockey careers. </p><p>Our players have aspirations to play at another level competitively, so we try to imitate the next level so they can understand and prepare for that, says Dobson. Weve got a great group of strong characters with good work ethics, and its up to the coaching staff to direct where they go.</p><p>The Vitos coaching staff is also committed to developing good citizens. Dobson, along with assistant coaches Ryan Leland, Jamie McKinley, and Scott Friars, instill many core </p><p>values in their players, including team pride, leadership, respect, and a strong work ethic. </p><p>Dobson says their major sponsor is a huge in uence on the team. Vitos has been a big part of our program for a number of years, and theyre very involved in other sports around the city, he says. Theyre an incredible company, and [Vitos owners] the Georgoudis family is an incredible family. They share our teams core values, and model them for the players every day.</p><p>Dobson expects these qualities will pay dividends for these players down the road, either in hockey or their professional lives. </p><p>Every year we get twenty kids and twenty athletes, and our goal is to get them to the next level of hockey, he says. Some of them will, some of them wont, but the one guarantee is that they will contribute to society in some manner. All of the lessons they learn on and off the ice are applicable.</p><p>Some of Dobsons players are already making waves. Forward Jason Thorpe is currently leading the team in scoring, and was drafted by the Saint John Sea Dogs in the eleventh round of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League draft. Currently in his third year with the team, the assistant captain has always loved the challenge of competitive hockey. </p><p>My goal, as soon as I started playing hockey, was to play AAA all the way through, he says. Its harder, but right from the beginning I wanted to play as hard as I could.</p><p>A team leader on the ice, Thorpe says he has learned a lot during his time with the Vitos. You can transition what youve learned from hockey into everyday life. We learn to lead, so when people need help we know what to do.</p><p>Thorpe hopes to continue his hockey career in the QMJHL or at the Junior A level, and would like to earn a hockey scholarship upon graduation. Id like to study kinesiology or something sports related, </p><p>he says. I want to get an education from hockey, so if </p><p>he says. I want to get an education from hockey, so if someone asks me to come, Ill go right there.</p><p>Defensemen and fellow assistant captain Alex Simpson shares Thorpes enthusiasm for the game. A grade twelve student at Rothesay High School, Simpson was drafted in the ninth round by the Saint John Seadogs. While he wants to play for as long as possible, Simpson has no illusions about playing in the NHL. </p><p>As you grow older you begin to realize that the chances are smaller and smaller. If I can get some money to go to school, it would be like playing in the pros for me. Ultimately, Simpson sees himself focusing on a career in business. I dont know what Ill do just yet, but Ill probably get my masters and see where it takes me. Its hard to make that decision at seventeen years old. </p><p>A life in a suit and tie might seem miles away from a day in the rink, yet Simpson says his development on the ice has made an impact in the classroom. It helps keep me organized in school, and being a leader outside of hockey never hurts.</p><p>Right winger Dylan Jones and forward Matt Porter also wear letters for the team. Jones, the team captain, is the nephew of Tampa Bay Lightning defensemen Randy Jones. Jones wouldnt complain if he followed in his uncles footsteps, but for now he is currently relishing his role for the Vitos. Im proud to be the captain, he says. I love being a leader in the dressing room, and I think its going to be a good year for us.</p><p>Porter agrees. Were looking better than last year. We have a faster, younger team, and we should come together really well. This is my last kick at the can, and I want to make it a good one.</p><p>A winning record and a championship would also make Dobson and his players very happy, but he will consider the season successful if some of his players make it past AAA and into the next phase of their careers.</p><p>Our program is built towards having players drafted at multiple levels, he says. Wed like to increase the number of alumni that have gone on to Major A, Tier Two Junior, or University hockey.</p><p>Better yet, Dobson would like to see his players graduate from the program with their core values intact. If his students can take what they learn during their time with the Vitos and apply it to their everyday lives, Dobson thinks they can be positive ambassadors for the sport, whether theyre professional hockey players or businessmen. Now that would be a hockey story worth spreading around. </p><p>Our core values translate directly into every day life, says Dobson. Some days you win and some days you lose, but you can evaluate, learn from those mistakes, and improve on your performance. If our players can take these qualities and apply them to their professions, they have a chance to do some special things.</p><p>SPORTING</p><p>We carry new and used sporting goods! All sports all seasons!</p><p>Get your skates sharpened here!14 Bayside driveSaint John NB6481410</p><p>www.theboxsportinggoods.ca</p><p>GOODS</p><p>$5.00 a pair taxes in</p><p>www.vitos.ca</p><p>Vitos Midget AAA Hockey Team</p></li><li><p>When minor hockey teams make the news, the stories often take a negative slant. On ice brawls, unscrupulous coaches, and overbearing parents often take focus away from the game itself, leaving those unfamiliar with the sport with a bad taste in their mouths. Forget the fact that hundreds of coaches and thousands of children participate in the sport across the country each year; one nationally publicized ght ruins the whole bunch, and overshadows every personal and team victory our unof cial national sport has to offer. </p><p>Ken Dobson is working hard to place a positive face on Saint John minor hockey. The head of the Saint John Vitos Major Midget hockey team, Dobson not only strives to develop top notch hockey players, but community leaders as well. Some of the 15 to 17 year old high school students will use their time with the Vitos as a stepping stone to pro, semi-pro or university hockey, but all of the players that join the team will learn intangible skills that help them develop into mature, responsible adults. </p><p>A long-time youth hockey coach, Dobson helmed Team New Brunswick at the 2007 Canada Winter Games, and also worked with the under-17 and under-16 New Brunswick teams at the 2006 and 2005 Atlantic Challenge Cup, respectively. Dobson re-joined the Vitos after the departure of coach Jeff LeBlanc earlier this year (he was an assistant coach for the team in 2006-2007), and is committed to preparing his players for the next step in their hockey careers. </p><p>Our players have aspirations to play at another level competitively, so we try to imitate the next level so they can understand and prepare for that, says Dobson. Weve got a great group of strong characters with good work ethics, and its up to the coaching staff to direct where they go.</p><p>The Vitos coaching staff is also committed to developing good citizens. Dobson, along with assistant coaches Ryan Leland, Jamie McKinley, and Scott Friars, instill many core </p><p>values in their players, including team pride, leadership, respect, and a strong work ethic. </p><p>Dobson says their major sponsor is a huge in uence on the team. Vitos has been a big part of our program for a number of years, and theyre very involved in other sports around the city, he says. Theyre an incredible company, and [Vitos owners] the Georgoudis family is an incredible family. They share our teams core values, and model them for the players every day.</p><p>Dobson expects these qualities will pay dividends for these players down the road, either in hockey or their professional lives. </p><p>Every year we get twenty kids and twenty athletes, and our goal is to get them to the next level of hockey, he says. Some of them will, some of them wont, but the one guarantee is that they will contribute to society in some manner. All of the lessons they learn on and off the ice are applicable.</p><p>Some of Dobsons players are already making waves. Forward Jason Thorpe is currently leading the team in scoring, and was drafted by the Saint John Sea Dogs in the eleventh round of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League draft. Currently in his third year with the team, the assistant captain has always loved the challenge of competitive hockey. </p><p>My goal, as soon as I started playing hockey, was to play AAA all the way through, he says. Its harder, but right from the beginning I wanted to play as hard as I could.</p><p>A team leader on the ice, Thorpe says he has learned a lot during his time with the Vitos. You can transition what youve learned from hockey into everyday life. We learn to lead, so when people need help we know what to do.</p><p>Thorpe hopes to continue his hockey career in the QMJHL or at the Junior A level, and would like to earn a hockey scholarship upon graduation. Id like to study kinesiology or something sports related, </p><p>he says. I want to get an education from hockey, so if </p><p>he says. I want to get an education from hockey, so if someone asks me to come, Ill go right there.</p><p>Defensemen and fellow assistant captain Alex Simpson shares Thorpes enthusiasm for the game. A grade twelve student at Rothesay High School, Simpson was drafted in the ninth round by the Saint John Seadogs. While he wants to play for as long as possible, Simpson has no illusions about playing in the NHL. </p><p>As you grow older you begin to realize that the chances are smaller and smaller. If I can get some money to go to school, it would be like playing in the pros for me. Ultimately, Simpson sees himself focusing on a career in business. I dont know what Ill do just yet, but Ill probably get my masters and see where it takes me. Its hard to make that decision at seventeen years old. </p><p>A life in a suit and tie might seem miles away from a day in the rink, yet Simpson says his development on the ice has made an impact in the classroom. It helps keep me organized in school, and being a leader outside of hockey never hurts.</p><p>Right winger Dylan Jones and forward Matt Porter also wear letters for the team. Jones, the team captain, is the nephew of Tampa Bay Lightning defensemen Randy Jones. Jones wouldnt complain if he followed in his uncles footsteps, but for now he is currently relishing his role for the Vitos. Im proud...</p></li></ul>