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646 Book Reviews anticancer agents, organ imaging agents, metabolite antag- onism, cardiovascular drugs, antiviral agents, have been expanded. The text is clearly written and well illustrated and will be of great use to those who wish to have a greater understanding how drugs work. It is also excellent value for money. angiotensin-aldosterone system; brain peptides; clinical use of hypothalamic hormones; endocrine effects of stress; affective disorder; pineal gland; endogenous opiod peptides; dysfunction in CNS; gastrointestinal hormones and immune system. Each chapter is provided with an extensive bibli- ography. A very useful and interesting book. ImmunologicalTechniques in Insect Biology--Edited by L. I. GILBERT and T. A. MILLER. 284 pp. 1988. Springer, Berlin. DM 110. This volume provides practical details, using insect material, on how to carry out analytical immunological techniques; ELISA and monoclonal antibodies; time-resolved fluor- escence immunoassay; immunocytochemistry; immuno- assay of pesticides; RIA of ecdysteroids and juvenile hormone; RIA and ELISA of peptides. Each chapter has a detailed bibliography so that the reader can follow up specific methods. In many cases the best method of analysis is an immunological one and this book will help the reader develop such technique for insects and animals. Hearing in Vertebrates; a Psyehophysics Databook-- By RICHARD R. FAY. 621 pp. 1988. Hill-Fay Associates, Winnetka, USA $75. The main sections of this book are: the lateral line system; hearing in fishes; hearing in amphibians and reptiles; hearing in birds; hearing in mammals; comparisons amongst verte- brates (selected hearing capacities); and there is also a subject index, a species index and an author index. The author provides numerical data both in tables and graphs for the hearing capacity of each species where it is known. Audiograms are presented for 143 species. Hearing is com- pared in aquatic and terrestrial animals. Other features discussed include frequency and intensity discrimination, masking, sound localization, binaural hearing, electrical stimulation of ear and brain, hearing development. This is an essential data-referenee volume for all those working on hearing in animals. Cell and Tissue Biology; a Textbook of Histology, 6th Edition---Edited by LEON WEISS. 1158 pp. 1988. Urban and Schwartzenberg, Baltimore, USA. $59.50. This is a major revision of a standard text on histology. The accent has been changed to bring in the modern approach to cell and tissue biology, hence the change in the title. There are 35 contributors and they deal with each of the major tissues and organs of the body. The book is very well illustrated with photographs, drawings and many transmis- sion and scanning electron micrographs. There is a detailed bibliography at the end of each chapter, giving general and more specific references. The approach is a functional one, emphasizing that form and function are closely related, linking in biochemical, physiological, pathological and clinical information. The reader will get a very good picture of the functional architecture and dynamic structures of the body. Clinical Neuroendocrinology--Edited by R. COLLU, G. M. BROWN and G. R. VAN LOON. 609 pp. 1988. Blackwell Scientific Publications, Boston, USA. It is often difficult for clinicians to keep abreast of the developments in neuroendocrinology. This book provides the scientific basis for modern treatment. The chapters deal with the neuroendocrinology of: hypothalamic-pltuitary axis', control of anterior pituitary function; regulation and pathophysiology of posterior pituitary; control of gonadotropin secretion; anorexia nervosa; growth; acromegaly; growth hormone deficiency; corticotropin se- cretion and Cushing's disease; thyrotropin regulation; hyperprolactinaemia; pituitary adenomas; renin- Drug delivery to the Respiratory Tract--Edited by D. GANDER'ION and T. JONES. 141 pp. 1987. Ellis Hor- wood/VCH, Weinheim. The lungs offer a direct pathway drugs and the development of metered drug application has been an important advance in medication. This book deals with lung physiology, adrenoreceptor agonists and steroids in respiratory disease, sodium cromoglycate, metabolism of drugs in the respir- atory tract, chemical induced lung toxicity, structure and function of mucus, drug administration to the respiratory tract, pressurized metered dose inhalers, formulation of powders for inhalation, jet nebulisers, intranasal administra- tion of drugs, and provides a very useful survey of the subject. Catecholamines, Part l--Edited by U. TRENDELENBURG and N. WEINER. Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology, Volume 90. 571 pp. 1988. Springer, Berlin. DM 450. This is the successor to the volume, Catecholamines, edited by Blashko and Muscholl in 1972, and consists of an additional selection of topics. These are: transport and storage of catecholamines (CA) in vesicles; exocytosis in adrenal medulla and sympathetic nerve; monoamine oxi- dase; transport of amines across the axonal membranes of NA and DA neurones; indirectly acting sympathetic amines; extraneuronal uptake and metabolism of CA; CA receptors; presynaptic receptors on CA neurons and adaptive super- sensitivity. Each topic is authoritatively treated, clearly presented and well documented, as befits the volumes in this excellent series. It would help the less specialized reader if the editors could have presented a short list of the major developments over the past 15 years that are more fully described in the book. Most chapters present a series of conclusions and so provide an orientation. Advances in Drug Research, Volume 17--Edited by B. TESTA. 479 pp. 1988. Academic Press, London. £48. There are five reviews in this volume. (1) Recent advances in the search for selective antiviral agents (agents are capable of attacking herpes and rhinovirus without attacking the host DNA, so making drug design more rational). (2) Developments in the field of synthetic cephalosporin antibi- otics (the molecular structure of the target enzymes is being understood and will allow better design of antibiotics). (3) Advances in drug receptor research in the cardiovascular system (CV diseases are often associated with changes in receptor function, there is better knowledge of the receptor structures and ligand binding onto the active sites). (4) Pharmacology and therapeutic potential of serotonin recep- tor agnnists and antagonists (these can help treat mental depression, anxiety, alcoholism, obesity, migraine, hyper- tension and thrombosis). (5) GABA agonists, antagonists and uptake inhibitors, structure-activity relationship and therapeutic potential (these are known for GABA-A, GABA-BZD and GABA-B receptors). Hyperlipidaemia and Athermmlerusis--Edited by K. E. SUCKLING and P. H. E. GROOT. 228 pp. 1988. Academic Press, London. £31. This symposium volume discusses current views on lipo- protein synthesis, metabolism and transport; plaque for- mation; epidemiology of atherosclerosis and coronary heart

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Page 1: Hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis

646 Book Reviews

anticancer agents, organ imaging agents, metabolite antag- onism, cardiovascular drugs, antiviral agents, have been expanded. The text is clearly written and well illustrated and will be of great use to those who wish to have a greater understanding how drugs work. It is also excellent value for money.

angiotensin-aldosterone system; brain peptides; clinical use of hypothalamic hormones; endocrine effects of stress; affective disorder; pineal gland; endogenous opiod peptides; dysfunction in CNS; gastrointestinal hormones and immune system. Each chapter is provided with an extensive bibli- ography. A very useful and interesting book.

Immunological Techniques in Insect Biology--Edited by L. I. GILBERT and T. A. MILLER. 284 pp. 1988. Springer, Berlin. DM 110.

This volume provides practical details, using insect material, on how to carry out analytical immunological techniques; ELISA and monoclonal antibodies; time-resolved fluor- escence immunoassay; immunocytochemistry; immuno- assay of pesticides; RIA of ecdysteroids and juvenile hormone; RIA and ELISA of peptides. Each chapter has a detailed bibliography so that the reader can follow up specific methods. In many cases the best method of analysis is an immunological one and this book will help the reader develop such technique for insects and animals.

Hearing in Vertebrates; a Psyehophysics Databook-- By RICHARD R. FAY. 621 pp. 1988. Hill-Fay Associates, Winnetka, USA $75.

The main sections of this book are: the lateral line system; hearing in fishes; hearing in amphibians and reptiles; hearing in birds; hearing in mammals; comparisons amongst verte- brates (selected hearing capacities); and there is also a subject index, a species index and an author index. The author provides numerical data both in tables and graphs for the hearing capacity of each species where it is known. Audiograms are presented for 143 species. Hearing is com- pared in aquatic and terrestrial animals. Other features discussed include frequency and intensity discrimination, masking, sound localization, binaural hearing, electrical stimulation of ear and brain, hearing development. This is an essential data-referenee volume for all those working on hearing in animals.

Cell and Tissue Biology; a Textbook of Histology, 6th Edition---Edited by LEON WEISS. 1158 pp. 1988. Urban and Schwartzenberg, Baltimore, USA. $59.50.

This is a major revision of a standard text on histology. The accent has been changed to bring in the modern approach to cell and tissue biology, hence the change in the title. There are 35 contributors and they deal with each of the major tissues and organs of the body. The book is very well illustrated with photographs, drawings and many transmis- sion and scanning electron micrographs. There is a detailed bibliography at the end of each chapter, giving general and more specific references. The approach is a functional one, emphasizing that form and function are closely related, linking in biochemical, physiological, pathological and clinical information. The reader will get a very good picture of the functional architecture and dynamic structures of the body.

Clinical Neuroendocrinology--Edited by R. COLLU, G. M. BROWN and G. R. VAN LOON. 609 pp. 1988. Blackwell Scientific Publications, Boston, USA.

It is often difficult for clinicians to keep abreast of the developments in neuroendocrinology. This book provides the scientific basis for modern treatment. The chapters deal with the neuroendocrinology of: hypothalamic-pltuitary axis', control of anterior pituitary function; regulation and pathophysiology of posterior pituitary; control of gonadotropin secretion; anorexia nervosa; growth; acromegaly; growth hormone deficiency; corticotropin se- cretion and Cushing's disease; thyrotropin regulation; hyperprolactinaemia; pituitary adenomas; renin-

Drug delivery to the Respiratory Tract--Edited by D. GANDER'ION and T. JONES. 141 pp. 1987. Ellis Hor- wood/VCH, Weinheim.

The lungs offer a direct pathway drugs and the development of metered drug application has been an important advance in medication. This book deals with lung physiology, adrenoreceptor agonists and steroids in respiratory disease, sodium cromoglycate, metabolism of drugs in the respir- atory tract, chemical induced lung toxicity, structure and function of mucus, drug administration to the respiratory tract, pressurized metered dose inhalers, formulation of powders for inhalation, jet nebulisers, intranasal administra- tion of drugs, and provides a very useful survey of the subject.

Catecholamines, Part l - -Edited by U. TRENDELENBURG and N. WEINER. Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology, Volume 90. 571 pp. 1988. Springer, Berlin. DM 450.

This is the successor to the volume, Catecholamines, edited by Blashko and Muscholl in 1972, and consists of an additional selection of topics. These are: transport and storage of catecholamines (CA) in vesicles; exocytosis in adrenal medulla and sympathetic nerve; monoamine oxi- dase; transport of amines across the axonal membranes of NA and DA neurones; indirectly acting sympathetic amines; extraneuronal uptake and metabolism of CA; CA receptors; presynaptic receptors on CA neurons and adaptive super- sensitivity. Each topic is authoritatively treated, clearly presented and well documented, as befits the volumes in this excellent series. It would help the less specialized reader if the editors could have presented a short list of the major developments over the past 15 years that are more fully described in the book. Most chapters present a series of conclusions and so provide an orientation.

Advances in Drug Research, Volume 17--Edited by B. TESTA. 479 pp. 1988. Academic Press, London. £48.

There are five reviews in this volume. (1) Recent advances in the search for selective antiviral agents (agents are capable of attacking herpes and rhinovirus without attacking the host DNA, so making drug design more rational). (2) Developments in the field of synthetic cephalosporin antibi- otics (the molecular structure of the target enzymes is being understood and will allow better design of antibiotics). (3) Advances in drug receptor research in the cardiovascular system (CV diseases are often associated with changes in receptor function, there is better knowledge of the receptor structures and ligand binding onto the active sites). (4) Pharmacology and therapeutic potential of serotonin recep- tor agnnists and antagonists (these can help treat mental depression, anxiety, alcoholism, obesity, migraine, hyper- tension and thrombosis). (5) GABA agonists, antagonists and uptake inhibitors, structure-activity relationship and therapeutic potential (these are known for GABA-A, GABA-BZD and GABA-B receptors).

Hyperlipidaemia and Athermmlerusis--Edited by K. E. SUCKLING and P. H. E. GROOT. 228 pp. 1988. Academic Press, London. £31.

This symposium volume discusses current views on lipo- protein synthesis, metabolism and transport; plaque for- mation; epidemiology of atherosclerosis and coronary heart

Page 2: Hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis

Book Reviews 647

disease; and therapeutic fibrinolysis. In the developed world atherosclerosis accounts for up to 45% of all deaths. It is multi-factorial and some of the stages in the develop- ment of the lesions are described in this book, i.e. low density lipoproteins, apolipoprotein BI00 and B48, cholesterol metabolism, macrophages and ceroid, arterial proteoglycans.

The Challenge of Epidemiology. Issues and Selected Read- ings--Edited by C. BucK, A. LLOPlS, E. NAJERA and M. TERRIS. 989 pp. 1988. Pan American Health Organization, WHO, Washington. $30 (paperback).

The understanding of many diseases has been greatly helped by measuring the occurrence and spread of specific illness. Classic studies are those of Snow on cholera, Jenner on smallpox, and Semmelweis on child bed fever. These and many others are presented in this useful volume so that the reader can see the basic studies on tuberculosis, polio, alcoholic liver cirrhosis, yellow fever, salmonella, smoking and lung cancer, vitamin deficiencies, poisoned cooking oil etc. There are also discussions on the relevance of the information to present day studies. Many diseases, such as cancer and multiple sclerosis, have environmental com- ponents, and epidemiological studies should make these more clear.