How did Christianity Spread?  The spread of Christianity is not linear  Rather, it is very gradual, and happens over a long period of time.  It

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    18-Dec-2015

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> How did Christianity Spread? The spread of Christianity is not linear Rather, it is very gradual, and happens over a long period of time. It starts from Jewish Synagogues and private homes The initial enclaves expand with time As it expands, it becomes more hierarchical By the 4 th century we have bishops ( /episkopos), namely church officials overseeing entire regions </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Rome in the New Testament Gospel of Matthew: the miracle involving the son of the centurion The Role of Pontius Pilate and the Romans in the Crucifixion of Jesus Gospel of John: The reference is probably an anachronism, having in mind the outcome of the final destruction of the temple of Jerusalem The Pentecost Acts of the Apostles Letter to the Romans Rome is portrayed as the violent occupying force. </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> How the Roman world contributed to the Spread of Christianity Pax Romana The unification of the three sides of the Mediterranean, relative safety in the sea routes, and the Roman road network facilitated movement. Paul alone is believed to have covered 10,000 miles in terms of travel. The widespread use of common languages (Greek in the East and Latin in the West) facilitated communication and the spread of the message The religious and cultural syncretism of the Roman empire and the presence of so many religions allowed for the followers of Christianity to preach their message all around the Mediterranean. While Islam had to conquer its way through the Near East, Christianity found a world unified, ready and receptive </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> The reasons why Christianity Spread so Effectively Its message was egalitarian in many ways (including women, slaves, and all socioeconomic classes) It gave hope by promising a better life after death It appealed to the masses of poor and destitute inhabitants of large cities, but also to members of the upper classes who felt spiritually empty It promised equality and social justice, and offered a positive alternative to an uncertain and dangerous world It appealed to tendencies of oriental mysticism </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Early Centers of Christianity Jerusalem Antioch Corinth Ephesus Thessalonike Rome Alexandria North Africa (Carthage, Hippo) </li> </ul>