Hospital charges for infectious disease in elderly increase

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  • PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 557 - 12 Jul 2008

    Hospital charges for infectiousdisease in elderly increase

    In older adults, total charges for infectious disease(ID) hospitalisations increased in the US between 1998and 2004, according to a US study.

    The retrospective analysis of hospital discharge datafor older adults (aged 65 years) was conducted todetermine hospital charges (2004 values) associatedwith ID hospitalisation and specific ID categories, and toestimate rates of ID hospitalisation in this population.

    In older adults, IDs accounted for 13% ofhospitalisation charges and 14% of all hospitalisations,with charges for ID hospitalisation totalling more than$US261 billion. The annual hospital charges for IDhospitalisations increased over the study period($US45.7 billion in 2004 vs $US31.4 billion in 1998).The average ID hospitalisation charge increased 36%,from $US18 396 in 1998 to $US25 034 in 2004; the costper older adult in the US increased from around $US865per person in 1998 to $US1160 by 2004. With regard tospecific ID categories, lower respiratory tract infectionsaccounted for 41% of ID hospital charges, septicaemiafor 19% and kidney, urinary tract and bladder infectionsfor 9%. ID hospitalisation rates remained relativelystable, although the researchers state that with aforecasted large increase to come in the number of olderadults in the US, there will be an increase in the numbersof older adult ID hospitalisations with associated largeincreases in total ID hospital costs.Curns AT, et al. Hospital charges attributable to a primary diagnosis of infectiousdiseases in older adults in the United States, 1998 to 2004. Journal of theAmerican Geriatrics Society 56: 969-975, No. 6, Jun 2008 801116885

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    PharmacoEconomics & Outcomes News 12 Jul 2008 No. 5571173-5503/10/0557-0001/$14.95 Adis 2010 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved

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