Horton Kirby Environmental Education Centre How can environmental projects enhance pupils scientific understanding ?

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Horton Kirby Environmental Education Centre How can environmental projects enhance pupils scientific understanding ? </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Which scientific skills and understanding can be developed using the outdoors? Observational skills An opportunity for children to use all their senses to find out more about the natural world An opportunity for children to use all their senses to find out more about the natural world Identifying different organisms Understanding the relationship between animals and plants Understanding the needs of animals Understanding what plants need to grow Understand the lifecycle of plants Understanding habitats Understanding adaptation Understand food chains Understanding animal behaviour Understanding properties of rocks Understand energy </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Plants - Identification Gatekeeper OPAL Woodland Trust Field Studies Council Science </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Animal Identification charts Animal Identification charts - Science Menu </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Nature Trail Could you develop a route around your habitats? Can a plaque be placed in the different habitats? Can you gather information at different times of the year from the different places? Science </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Being a Camera! Establish a field of vision by extending your arms in front of you, hands in a fist with the thumbs pointing straight up. Look carefully at the picture framed by your thumbs. Keep your head still and move your eyes from left to right and vice-versa as a wide angled lens. Observe carefully your picture. Look away and sketch what you saw. Zoom lens use both hands to form a tube [or use a card/wooden disc with a hole in the centre or cardboard tubes of varying diameters] and focus on something in the distance, particularly concentrating on shape and colour. Close-up lens zoom in to the ground at your feet with your zoom lens. Find something to look at closely. Rose tinted spectacles. Look at your surroundings through coloured acetate sheets either taped on to cardboard tubes or in picture frames Science </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Touchy egg boxes Words of opposite meaning written on the bottom of the boxes wet/dry, rough/smooth, dead/alive, shiny/dull etc. Find three pairs of things that match your opposites and place in adjacent pairs of holders in the egg box. Swap boxes and guess the words from the contents. Science </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Coloured Worms - camouflage Coloured worms. Use coloured pieces of wool about 7cms long in groups of ten pieces per colour. Hang them on bushes, trees, shrubs, on the ground. Story about a local farmer and his worm farm, growing them for fishermen/scientists/restaurants/good EU subsidy. Theyre very valuable because of the wonderful colours theyre bred in and some have escaped. Theyre kept in groups of 3/5/10 and X number of these groups have escaped. Help him find them. Embellish the story as required and depending on location Pastry worms for gulls! Science </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Pitfall traps Science </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Collecting minibeasts Science </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Use of ICT ICT </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Blindfold Trail Science </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Magic Water! Pick up small interesting things leaves, grass, flowers, twigs, [care needed] and smell them. [Beware of allergies.] Crush them and put into a plastic cup of magic water. Smell them. Make a cocktail and see who has the nicest/worst smelling cup. Science </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> Woodland Concert and Animal Ears Sit in a secluded place with a magic crystal held tight in your hands. Close your eyes and the magic crystal helps you to hear the woodland concert. Cup hands around ears to imitate animal ears. Science </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> A Sound Map Science </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> Canopy gazing Study the tree canopy by holding a mirror horizontally on the nose just below the eyes. Look down into the mirror to see the tree canopy. Science </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> Natures Palette Artist palette shaped piece of card with pieces of double sided sticky tape stuck on. Each person/pair/group collect things to remind them of the walk and to show natures variety. Could also stick paint chart samples on and ask children to match what they find to colours. BUT discourage too much picking. Good to use as part of a display. Science </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> A Journey Stick Science Menu </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> Meadow 1 Meadow 2 Patio hayrattle Plants for Invertebrates Shelter foxglove geranium Comfrey (purple) Comfrey (white) primroses bluebells Wood anenome bugle rose of sharon cotoneaster budlea As of October 24 th 2012 Menu </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> What animals need to stay alive Which animals can we provide with food/water and shelter? Invertebrates a place to hibernate Birds tables, feeders, nests, nesting materials hanging up Small mammals a place to hibernate Amphibians a place to spend the winetr Menu </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> What helps plants to grow Investigation over time cover up areas of grass measure the grass over time and make observations. Investigation over time grow plants in pot plants; add different amounts of water and measure over time. Place some in greehouse. Menu </li> <li> Slide 22 </li> <li> Lifecycle of plants A metre square garden children can plant a couple of seedlings of different plants. Take photos over time. </li> <li> Slide 23 </li> <li> Plants - Estimating age of living tree If you have chosen a tree in woodland, divide the circumference in centimetres by 1.25. If you have chosen a tree in an open space, divide the circumference in centimetres by 2.5. Science </li> <li> Slide 24 </li> <li> Height of places PlaceDistance from place (m) Degrees of elevation Height of the place (m) E. Fir tree in garden F. Oak tree at back of classroom G. Cherry tree by hibernation area H. Holy tree by logs I. Fir tree at bottom of wildlife area Maths Menu </li> <li> Slide 25 </li> <li> Understanding habitats Which types of habitats can you create at school? 1.Rockeries/log/hot spots piles/pit-fall traps for mini beasts 2.Composters 3. Grasslands/Meadows 4. Hedgerows 5.Herb Gardens 6.Marshlands 7.Trees 8.Vegetable plots 9.Butterfly/bee garden 10.Ponds 11.Hibernating areas (minibeast hotel) </li> <li> Slide 26 </li> <li> What type of pond? Science </li> <li> Slide 27 </li> <li> Hibernating Areas </li> <li> Slide 28 </li> <li> Build a nest using newspaper strips and tape. Can it hold four mini-eggs? And a tennis ball (parent bird)? ScienceDT </li> <li> Slide 29 </li> <li> Pattern-seeking Pattern-seeking What sort of information/data could you collect from different habitats throughout the year? Science Menu </li> <li> Slide 30 </li> <li> Adaptation Create their animal for a particular environment. Provide the children with lots of props (e.g. snorkel, flippers, wings, etc) can they become the animal and explain how it is suited to where it lives. Menu </li> <li> Slide 31 </li> <li> Food chain headbands Children choose a headband. They must arrange themselves into a food chain without saying what they are. They can pass along an arrow to show the passage of energy. Menu </li> <li> Slide 32 </li> <li> Animal behaviour - Being a minibeast! Use some drama to shrink the children. With a hand lens, 2 metres of string and some cocktail sticks they go on a journey as an animal. They place their flags where they see something interesting or meet another animal. They can then take a partner through the journey talking about the life of the animal Science Menu </li> <li> Slide 33 </li> <li> Curiosity Corner in the Classroom What could be in it? Science </li> <li> Slide 34 </li> <li> Recording and sharing Learning log/diary (big books) Photos and video ICT comic life, 2connect Regular sharing in assemblies </li> <li> Slide 35 </li> <li> Water - Geological rockery permeable rocks; aquifers Science Geography </li> <li> Slide 36 </li> <li> Water - Investigating soil Geography Science Menu </li> <li> Slide 37 </li> <li> Energy - Mini Greenhouse ScienceDT </li> <li> Slide 38 </li> <li> Energy - Heating water using the Sun Cardboard box Black bin liner ScienceDT </li> <li> Slide 39 </li> <li> Energy - from water power ScienceDT </li> <li> Slide 40 </li> <li> Weather - Making an anemometer cane Broom handle Science Geography DT Menu </li> <li> Slide 41 </li> <li> Anemometer and weather vane Geography DT </li> <li> Slide 42 </li> <li> Science Programme of Study: Key Stage 1Science Programme of Study: Key Stage 1 The teaching of science in Key Stage 1 should introduce pupils to a variety of plants and animals (including humans), materials and physical phenomena. Pupils should study (by working scientifically, working practically, and using a variety of research methods including using books and ICT): Basic structures and simple classification of common plants and animals Life processes, including growth, reproduction and feeding, and growing plants Habitats, including food chains Simple physical properties of everyday materials in relation to their uses Sources of light Night and day, and the movement of the Sun across the sky Forces that make things move, speed up and slow down, and change shape. Science biographies, for example, Charles Darwin. </li> <li> Slide 43 </li> <li> Science Programme of Study: Key Stage 1 Working scientifically is to be delivered through the teaching of substantive subject content, and is not to be taught separately as content in its own right. In Year 1 and Year 2, working scientifically includes aspects of: Observing closely using simple equipment Performing simple tests Identifying and classifying Recording findings in various formats. Ensure pupils read and write scientific vocabulary, consistent with their phonic knowledge at Key Stage 1. </li> <li> Slide 44 </li> <li> Science Programme of Study: Lower Key Stage 2 The teaching of science in Lower Key Stage 2 should ensure that pupils know about a variety of plants and animals (including humans), materials and everyday phenomena. Pupils should study (by working scientifically, working practically, and using a variety of research methods including using books and ICT): The function of different parts of plants, and what plants need to survive What animals need to survive Movement in vertebrates, including humans Classification of living things: plants and animals Human digestion Food chains and food webs Introduction to evolution and inheritance Everyday materials that are attracted to magnets, or that sink/float How to make a magnet and the properties of magnets Simple physical properties of some kinds of rocks, and how rocks and fossils are formed States of matter and changes of state, with particular reference to water Sources of sound Light and shadows Solar systems and galaxies, including the motion of the Earth in relation to the Sun The uses of electricity, and how to wire a simple circuit. Science biographies, for example, Carl Linnaeus, Charles Darwin, Nicholas Copernicus, Galileo Galilei and Neil Armstrong. </li> <li> Slide 45 </li> <li> Science Programme of Study: Lower Key Stage 2 Working scientifically is to be delivered through the teaching of substantive subject content, and is not to be taught separately as content in its own right. In Year 3 and Year 4, working scientifically builds on earlier content and also includes aspects of: setting up simple comparative and fair tests beginning to make accurate measurements using standard units recording findings in various formats reporting on findings using results to draw conclusions and make predictions for setting up further tests. Ensure pupils read and spell scientific vocabulary correctly and with confidence, using their growing knowledge of spelling patterns and rules. </li> <li> Slide 46 </li> <li> Science Programme of Study: Upper Key Stage 2 The teaching of science in Upper Key Stage 2 should ensure that pupils know about a variety of plants and animals (including humans), materials and everyday phenomena. Pupils should study (by working scientifically, working practically, and using a variety of research methods including using books and ICT): Life cycles, including reproduction and growth Human circulatory system and gaseous exchange The diversity of organisms, including classification Life processes, including reproduction Inheritance and evolution happening over long periods of time Testing everyday materials for: hardness, solubility, conductivity (heat and electricity), magnetic behaviour Properties of everyday materials and reversible change Changes that form new materials and are hard to reverse Types of force and measurement of forces Electrostatics and magnetism The basic parts of a simple electric series circuit; short circuits The ray model of light. Science biographies, for example David Attenborough; Gerald Durrell, William Harvey, Galen, Charles Darwin, Sir Isaac Newton, and the Wright Brothers. </li> <li> Slide 47 </li> <li> Science Programme of Study: Upper Key Stage 2 Working scientifically is to be delivered through the teaching of substantive subject content, and is not to be taught separately as content in its own right. In Year 5 and Year 6, working scientifically builds on earlier content and also includes aspects of: Planning investigations, including controlling variables Taking measurements with increasing accuracy and precision Recording data and results of increasing complexity using various formats Reporting on findings from investigations, including written explanations, causal explanations and conclusions Presenting reports of findings in written form, displays and presentations Continuing to develop the ability to use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests. Ensure pupils read and spell all scientific vocabulary correctly. </li> <li> Slide 48 </li> <li> Main Differences Division of the Programme of Study (POS) There will now be Key Stage 1 (KS1), Lower Key Stage 2 (LKS2) and Upper Key Stage 2 (UKS2). Planning issue Scientific enquiry now changed to working scientifically. KS1 Many components of Scientific Enquiry missing: ask questions, think about what might happen, recognising a test as fair/unfair, controlling risks, and reviewing their work. The emphasis in KS1 and LKS2 seems more on developing understanding through comparative testing than on doing fair tests. Demonstrations this has been highlighted as a teaching strategy Structure of a lesson issue Coverage Within each Key Stage schools have the flexibility to introduce content earlier or later than set out in the POS. In addition, schools can introduce key stage content during an earlier stage if appropriate. Planning issue Key stage 1 Year 1 do not do materials, sound, forces, or electricity. Planning issue Biographies Resources issue Using outdoor environments all year. Planning issue </li> </ul>

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