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377 THE PATHOLOGICAL SOCIETY.-THE COLLEGE OF SURGEONS AND HOMCEOPATHY. between the New Equitable and all those offices which refuse remuneration to medical men for their important and essen- tial services. This principle of acting justly by the profession is one which he who runs may read. Instead of the risk of an angry and impertinent correspondence, as too frequently happens in the transactions of the medical man with the old I, offices, he finds that every application of the New Equitable ’, is accompanied by a cheque upon the bankers of the Company.. There is no risk of squabbles with the office at an unpleasant expense of time and temper, or of being set at strife with patients by the ill-mannered insinuations of Life Assurance officials. We have said there is nothing like a principle as an impetus to progress and success. The principle inherent in the New Equitable is the only one to be found in the history of Life Assurance, which rests upon the simple resolve to do justice to the followers of the profession of medicine. We may safely compare it with the principles set forth by other offices having medical titles and pretensions. The principle of the Clerical, Medical, and General, is simply that of returning as large a dividend as possible to the shareholders, and bonuses to the assured. The medical profession has been largely used to further these objects by this office, but the profession has never received one farthing of remuneration in return. The Medical, Invalid, and General started upon the principle of insuring diseased lives at proportionate rates,-a very laudable matter, but one in which the medical profession has no special interest. Unlike either of these offices, or indeed any other office in existence, the New Equitable is the pioneer of the rights and interests of every individual man in the profession in all that relates to the medical body; and this is perfectly compatible with an unlimited success as a public company. In supporting such an office the profession is merely per- forming a duty to itself. The profession can, and no doubt will, use the New Equitable as an engine for forcing the old and non-paying offices, which have so long insulted medical men with impunity, to do them justice, not as a matter of favour, but of right. The success of the New Equitable through the support of medical practitioners, will be a practical combination against the illiberal cupidity of the non-paying offices, which can have but one result, and that is the destruction for once and for aye, of the dogma that Life Assurance Directors have a right to the gratuitous advice of the medical profession. THE PATHOLOGICAL SOCIETY will commence, on Tuesday next, the sixth session of its vigorous and most useful existence; and we feel assured that the approaching session will not be behind its predecessors in the interest which will attach to its meetings, and in the pleasure and profit which its members will connect with its proceedings. On the first establishment of this Society there were some who did not hesitate to de- clare such a Society unnecessary,-that it could not succeed, -and under the cloak of such statements, or the influence of such feelings, to hold themselves aloof. The results of five eminently successful sessions have proved the groundless- ness of such opinions, and it is most satisfactory to find those members of the profession whose experience generates and position demands a cautious assent to novelties, coming for- ward, and taking an active part in the proceedings of the - Society. The Reports of the last session afford striking evi- dence of this gratifying fact, and the Pathological Society may now be said to number amongst its members nearly all those seniors in the profession whose well-earned and great reputation has been founded on the surest of all bases-patho- logy. Whilst amongst the juniors we believe there is scarcely one of those absent from the list of the Pathological Society who hopes to take a high rank in his profession. If there be such a one, we unhesitatingly say that there ought not to be. For is there an individual who will deny that in these days of refined speculation, and finely-drawn theories in diagnosis, an extended and practical acquaintance with pathology is otherwise than invaluable? And where can such knowledge be more surely acquired than at the meetings of this Society, which brings together all that is worthy of attention that can be found in the inspection chambers of the London hospitals! Encouraging as these facts are, we believe that the Patholo- gical Society may now place its entire reliance on the volumes of Reports which it has sent forth, on the list of members which that for the present year contains, and last, though not least, on one of the most assured evidences of success—an annual income above expenditure. THE meeting of the Council of the College of Surgeons on Thursday last has not led to any very satisfactory results. While the condemnation of globulism and the tricks of globulists was unanimous, the Council decided that they would wait to see what steps the censors of the College of Physicians were disposed to take, the Council feeling that-in such a matter the medical authorities should be the first to act. We believe the legal advisers of the College of Surgeons, aided by some of the members of the Council, were directed to frame an answer to the gentlemen who have memorialized the College, embodying this opinion, and at the same time conveying the most unreserved condemnation of homoeopathy. In our last week’s number, we mentioned that the President of the College of Physicians had summarily refused to examine a homceopath for the licence of the College. We believe that on Tuesday the President and Censors met, to revise -the list of fellows, licentiates, and extra-licentiates. We trust they have resolved to omit the names of Dr. MACKINTOSH, of Torquay, and Dr. SMART, of Scarborough, both extra- licentiates, and both figuring in the Medical Directory for 1851, and in various homoeopathic documents, as horneeo- paths. We believe these parties to be the only persons connected with the College avowedly practising globulism. It cannot be supposed, that if they have the power, the present Censors will be delicate about the expurgation of the College list, and this, with an enforcement of the laws of the College respecting consultations with improper persons, would be a sufficient precedent for the College of Surgeons. The Council of the College of Surgeons have now thrown the responsibility of tolerating homoeopathy upon the College of Physicians, and we trust the latter body will act promptly and decisively in the matter. HOMŒOPATHY AND LEGITIMATE MEDICINE. A SPECIAL general meeting of the fellows of the Medical Society of London was held on the 10th instant, at which the following resolutions were carried unanimously, and amid much applause :-

HOM$OElig;OPATHY AND LEGITIMATE MEDICINE

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377THE PATHOLOGICAL SOCIETY.-THE COLLEGE OF SURGEONS AND HOMCEOPATHY.

between the New Equitable and all those offices which refuseremuneration to medical men for their important and essen-tial services. This principle of acting justly by the professionis one which he who runs may read. Instead of the risk of

an angry and impertinent correspondence, as too frequentlyhappens in the transactions of the medical man with the old I,offices, he finds that every application of the New Equitable ’,is accompanied by a cheque upon the bankers of the Company..There is no risk of squabbles with the office at an unpleasantexpense of time and temper, or of being set at strife with

patients by the ill-mannered insinuations of Life Assuranceofficials.

We have said there is nothing like a principle as an impetusto progress and success. The principle inherent in the NewEquitable is the only one to be found in the history of LifeAssurance, which rests upon the simple resolve to do justiceto the followers of the profession of medicine. We maysafely compare it with the principles set forth by other officeshaving medical titles and pretensions. The principle of theClerical, Medical, and General, is simply that of returning aslarge a dividend as possible to the shareholders, and bonusesto the assured. The medical profession has been largely usedto further these objects by this office, but the profession hasnever received one farthing of remuneration in return. The

Medical, Invalid, and General started upon the principle ofinsuring diseased lives at proportionate rates,-a very laudablematter, but one in which the medical profession has no specialinterest. Unlike either of these offices, or indeed any otheroffice in existence, the New Equitable is the pioneer of therights and interests of every individual man in the professionin all that relates to the medical body; and this is perfectlycompatible with an unlimited success as a public company.

In supporting such an office the profession is merely per-forming a duty to itself. The profession can, and no doubtwill, use the New Equitable as an engine for forcing the oldand non-paying offices, which have so long insulted medicalmen with impunity, to do them justice, not as a matter offavour, but of right. The success of the New Equitablethrough the support of medical practitioners, will be a

practical combination against the illiberal cupidity of thenon-paying offices, which can have but one result, and that isthe destruction for once and for aye, of the dogma that LifeAssurance Directors have a right to the gratuitous advice ofthe medical profession.

THE PATHOLOGICAL SOCIETY will commence, on Tuesday next,the sixth session of its vigorous and most useful existence;and we feel assured that the approaching session will not bebehind its predecessors in the interest which will attach to itsmeetings, and in the pleasure and profit which its memberswill connect with its proceedings. On the first establishment

of this Society there were some who did not hesitate to de-clare such a Society unnecessary,-that it could not succeed,-and under the cloak of such statements, or the influence ofsuch feelings, to hold themselves aloof. The results of five

eminently successful sessions have proved the groundless-ness of such opinions, and it is most satisfactory to find thosemembers of the profession whose experience generates andposition demands a cautious assent to novelties, coming for-ward, and taking an active part in the proceedings of the- Society. The Reports of the last session afford striking evi-

dence of this gratifying fact, and the Pathological Societymay now be said to number amongst its members nearly allthose seniors in the profession whose well-earned and greatreputation has been founded on the surest of all bases-patho-logy. Whilst amongst the juniors we believe there is scarcelyone of those absent from the list of the Pathological Societywho hopes to take a high rank in his profession. If there be

such a one, we unhesitatingly say that there ought not to be.For is there an individual who will deny that in these days ofrefined speculation, and finely-drawn theories in diagnosis,an extended and practical acquaintance with pathologyis otherwise than invaluable? And where can such knowledgebe more surely acquired than at the meetings of this Society,which brings together all that is worthy of attention that canbe found in the inspection chambers of the London hospitals!Encouraging as these facts are, we believe that the Patholo-gical Society may now place its entire reliance on the volumesof Reports which it has sent forth, on the list of memberswhich that for the present year contains, and last, though notleast, on one of the most assured evidences of success—anannual income above expenditure.

THE meeting of the Council of the College of Surgeons onThursday last has not led to any very satisfactory results.While the condemnation of globulism and the tricks of

globulists was unanimous, the Council decided that theywould wait to see what steps the censors of the College ofPhysicians were disposed to take, the Council feeling that-insuch a matter the medical authorities should be the first to

act. We believe the legal advisers of the College of

Surgeons, aided by some of the members of the Council, weredirected to frame an answer to the gentlemen who havememorialized the College, embodying this opinion, and at thesame time conveying the most unreserved condemnation ofhomoeopathy.In our last week’s number, we mentioned that the President

of the College of Physicians had summarily refused to examinea homceopath for the licence of the College. We believe thaton Tuesday the President and Censors met, to revise -the listof fellows, licentiates, and extra-licentiates. We trust theyhave resolved to omit the names of Dr. MACKINTOSH,of Torquay, and Dr. SMART, of Scarborough, both extra-

licentiates, and both figuring in the Medical Directory for1851, and in various homoeopathic documents, as horneeo-paths. We believe these parties to be the only personsconnected with the College avowedly practising globulism.It cannot be supposed, that if they have the power, the presentCensors will be delicate about the expurgation of the Collegelist, and this, with an enforcement of the laws of the Collegerespecting consultations with improper persons, would be asufficient precedent for the College of Surgeons. The Councilof the College of Surgeons have now thrown the responsibilityof tolerating homoeopathy upon the College of Physicians, andwe trust the latter body will act promptly and decisively inthe matter.HOMŒOPATHY AND LEGITIMATE MEDICINE.

A SPECIAL general meeting of the fellows of the MedicalSociety of London was held on the 10th instant, at which thefollowing resolutions were carried unanimously, and amidmuch applause :-

Page 2: HOM$OElig;OPATHY AND LEGITIMATE MEDICINE

378

" 1. That in the opinion of this Society the practice ofhomoeopathy, or the prescribing medicines in what are called, infinitesimal doses,’ under a pretence that they are useful inthe cure of disease, is founded in palpable error, is a delusionon the part of the practitioner, a deception on the public, andmanifestly dangerous to its welfare.

"2. That the fellows of the Medical Society of Londoncannot honourably hold any professional communion withhomoeopathists.

" 3. That consequently, any fellow of this Society who shallhereafter practise homoeopathy, or who shall knowingly meet in’consultation any professed homoeopathist, will thereby renderhimself unworthy of the fellowship of this Society."

Medical Societies.

MEDICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON.

SATURDAY, OCT. 11, 1851.—DR. MURPHY IN THE CHAIR.

THE Society commenced its ordinary meetings for the ses-sion on this evening. There was rather a full attendance ofmembers. The business of the evening was commenced byMr. GAY, who introduced to the notice of the meeting a manon whom he had performed a

NOVEL OPERATION FOR A DISEASED JOINT.

He thought, when a suggestion for new modes of treatmentwas brought before this Society, that it would be more satis-factory to the fellows, if illustrations of the result of such treat-ment in the human subject could be placed before them at thesame time, a practice which the usages of this society had, and,as he felt, with much advantage, sanctioned. Mr. Gay wouldhave preferred showing the case in question at the time ofreading his paper, but the patient had left the hospital, andmight not at that time be forthcoming; whilst the case pre-sented such valuable evidence of the justness of his views, thathe should regret ocular demonstration of it should be lost tothe Society. Mr. Gay would only then say, that the man hadhad disease of the elbow-joint for eight years; that the end ofthe ulna had become extensively carious; that the cartilagehad been removed from the whole of the articular surfaces;that the integuments had become riddled with sinuses; and thatsuch was the condition of the joint, that it was deemed, at oneof the first hospitals in the metropolis, unfit for any treatmentbut amputation. Mr. Gay had opened the joint by free inci-sions, and, notwithstanding a serious relapse in the course ofrecovery by a severe attack of fever, the joint had becomeanchylosed, and the wounds had completely healed in twelveweeks. In reply to a question from Mr. Cooke, Mr. Gay saidthat it was not only in deference to the man’s wish, but inaccordance with his own notion of fitness for the work he wouldmost likely be employed in-viz., that of wheeling a barrow,&c., and that the arm was anchylosed in a straight posture.

REMOVAL or THE os CALCIS.

Mr. Gay then showed a patient from whose foot he had aboutsix months since taken the os calcis. For extensive and irre-

parable disease of that bone, the foot would, in former days,have been amputated. The case presented, however, showsthat the functions of the foot are very slightly interfered withby the loss of so large and important an element of its struc-ture ; for, as may be seen, the man can walk, and he can climba ladder, almost as well as he ever could, and his gait wasnot seriously affected by it in any way.Mr. WEEDON COOKE presented a

REMARKABLE SPECIMEN OF ANEURISM OF THE ARCH OF THE AORTA,

taken from an American who had died three days previouslyat the Royal Free Hospital. Mr. Cooke stated that he hadbeen requested by his friend and colleague, Mr. Thomas ’,Wakley-whose unavoidable absence he regretted-to exhibitthis diseased aorta to the Society and in doing so to state afew of the circumstances connected with the case. It

appeared that the patient was an emaciated tailor who hadbeen sent over from America to this country for change ofair, by Dr. Mott of New York, under the impression, accord-ing to the patient’s statement, that he was suffering fromsecondary syphilis. On the 25th of September, when hepresented himself at the Royal Free Hospital it was dis-covered that he had the aneurism of which he died, and therewere no symptoms indicative of secondary syphilis, unlessthe pain about the left shoulder and down the left arm could

be so considered. The poor fellow was only in the hospital aweek before the aneurism burst and he died, having duringthat week coughed up or vomited frequent portions of blood,sometimes amounting to as much as a pint. Mr. Wakleyhaving satisfied himself that the disease was in the arch ofthe aorta, of course could render no operative assistance, andthe treatment consisted simply of acids, acetate of lead, andopiates. There was a very distinct bruit in the aneurism.1tumour, which was situated just behind the first bone of thesternum and between the first and second ribs, producing abulging at this part. The pulsations in the tumour wereperceptible to the eye. Sometimes, but not at others, the pulsecould be felt in the left subclavian and radial arteries of theleft arm. The stethoscope revealed no lung disease. In thepost-mortem examination it appeared that the aneurism wassituated at the bend of the arch just as it begins to descend,and would have held a small orange. The sac was rent in twoplaces, anteriorly and posteriorly, the former having adhe-sions to the sternum and pleura, and the latter openingitself into the cellular tissue surrounding the oesophagus,and into the oesophagus itself, by a circular ragged hole thesize of a sixpence. Through this opening the blood had escapedinto the mouth and stomach, which latter organ containeda pint of coagulated blood. The left subclavian artery wasvery nearly closed, even when the clot was removed from thetumour, and when present it doubtless would sometimes beentirely so. The clot itself was very large, and in a greatmeasure organized. In the water which was used to wash thepreparation, there was deposited a quantity of earthy matter.The rest of the artery did not appear to have any eartlaydeposits in it. The left ventricle was considerably hyper-trophied. There were a few pleuritic adhesions, but thesubstance of both lungs was perfectly healthy, as were therest of the organs. Mr. Cooke stated that he had only thatafternoon been requested by Mr. Wakley to present thisinteresting morbid specimen to the Society, and thereforewould not offer any general observations upon the case, butleave the preparation on the table for the inspection of thosegentlemen present who took an especial interest in diseasesaffecting the heart and arteries.

Dr. MURPHY then read an address. He congratulated theSociety, that the difficulties in which they were involvedwere likely to be removed, the appeal which had been madeto the members for pecuniary assistance having been warmlyresponded to. There were only eighteen dissentients in thewhole list of the Society. The property in Bolt-court wasalso let to an eligible tenant; so that their prosperity mightbe considered to be assured.

HOMQMPATHIC QUACKERY—DB. MURPHY’S DEFENCE.

He next referred to the question of homoeopathy, which, hesaid, had been considered with great anxiety by the Council,the result being, the submitting the resolutions respecting it,which were adopted by the fellows on the preceding night,one of which had reference to the course to be pursued bythem when, in ordinary professional intercourse, they arebrought into contact’with the professors of this new mode ofpractice. On this and on the other points, he said, under anyother circumstances, it would be a work of supererogation forhim to assure them, that he fully agreed with them; and thatwhile he occupied that chair, he should endeavour to renderthese resolutions as efficient as possible. (Hear, hear.) Dr.Murphy then referred to the accusations that had been madeagainst him; and desired the fellows to pardon a slight digres-sion, while he sought to correct the misrepresentations, andreplied to charges, of which, were lie guilty, he should resignthe president’s chair. (Hear, hear.) To the first accusation,that he had met a homoeopath in consultation, his answer, inthe terms of the resolution, was, that he had never knowinglydone so, and, more than that, that he never would. He hadinvariably refused when asked so to do. This reply he hadalready placed on record; but to another and equally seriousone,-that in a certain certificate he had assigned as a cause ofdisease that which could not be true; that if true, its onlyeffect would be to injure the reputation of a most respectablepractitioner, and that, therefore, he was bound to retract hiswords,-he had not yet given any public reply. He nowstated, that his opinion had been most completely misunder-stood and misrepresented. In giving it, he had no intentionthat it should injure the gentleman alluded to, which it couldonly do by straining it from its proper meaning. He wouldwillingly have given that gentleman any explanation of thatcertificate necessary to exonerate him, but his correspondenceshowed that he did not desire it. It could only be by themost gross misrepresentation that that opinion could be made