History 7: Medieval Europe 07/03/2020 ¢  Lesson 4 Socratic Guiding Question: Keep this question in mind

  • View
    1

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of History 7: Medieval Europe 07/03/2020 ¢  Lesson 4 Socratic Guiding Question: Keep this...

  • History 7: Medieval Europe

    March 30 - April 3

    Time Allotment: 30 minutes per day

    Student Name: __________________________

    Teacher Name: __________________________

  • History 7: Medieval Europe

    March 30-April 3

    1

    Packet Overview

    Academic Honesty

    I certify that I completed this assignment

    independently in accordance with the GHNO

    Academy Honor Code.

    Student signature:

    ___________________________

    I certify that my student completed this

    assignment independently in accordance with

    the GHNO Academy Honor Code.

    Parent signature:

    ___________________________

    Additional Notes: Be sure to complete the packet in the proper order and not to skip around, as the order

    provided is intended to maximize WONDER!

    Date Objective(s) Page Number

    Monday, March 30 1. Explain why Charlemagne brought neighboring

    barbarian tribes under Frankish dominion.

    2

    Tuesday, March 31 1. Contrast the causes and effects of Charlemagne’s

    coronation by Pope Leo III.

    6

    Wednesday, April 1 1. Compare Charlemagne’s personal faith and

    intellectual life with his reforms of the Catholic

    Church and the Education system.

    10

    Thursday, April 2 1. Construct an essay arguing about the motivations

    for Charlemagne’s actions.

    14

    Friday, April 3 1. You will find it when you get there. Experience

    wonder by not skipping ahead, but completing the

    packet in the order it is in. :)

    16

  • History 7: Medieval Europe

    March 30-April 3

    2

    Monday, March 30

    History Unit: The Rise of the Frankish Kingdom

    Lesson 4: Charlemagne’s War with the Saxons (772-803)

    Lesson 4 Socratic Guiding Question: Keep this question in mind as you study!

    Why was Charlemagne at war every spring with the Saxons?

    Objective: Be able to do this by the end of this lesson.

    1. Explain why Charlemagne brought neighboring barbarian tribes under Frankish dominion.

    Introduction to Lesson 4

    Charles the Great (Charlemagne) was the son of Pepin the Short and the most famous of the Carolingian Kings.

    During his reign as King of the Franks, Charlemagne waged war with neighboring tribes of Germanic

    barbarians in order to subdue them and create a larger kingdom to be ruled by the Franks. He was able to

    conquer the Visigoths in northern Spain, the Bavarians in the region of the upper Danube, and the Lombards in

    the Po Valley. The Saxons, however, proved a much tougher test. A fierce and obstinate group, the Saxons

    would agree to peace terms or flee only to become belligerent (war-like) once again the following year. From

    772-803, Charlemagne engaged in at least eighteen campaigns against the resistant Saxons, who would first

    fight the Franks and then surrender or flee their enemy. Look at the map and read the account below.

    Charlemagne’s War Against the Saxons

    Answer the following question based upon the map found below.

    1. Highlight or circle the

    locations conquered by

    Charlemagne. Then list their

    names below.

    __________________________

    __________________________

    __________________________

    __________________________

    __________________________

    __________________________

  • History 7: Medieval Europe

    March 30-April 3

    3

    Directions: Read and answer the questions about the primary source below.

    Source—Einhard, Vita Caroli Magni, Chap. 7.

    No war ever undertaken by the Frankish nation was carried on with such persistence and bitterness, or cost

    so much labor, because the Saxons, like almost all the tribes of Germany, were a fierce people, given to the

    worship of devils and hostile to our religion, and did not consider it dishonorable to transgress and violate all

    law, human and divine. Then there were peculiar circumstances that tended to cause a breach of peace every

    day. Except in a few places, where large forests or mountain-ridges intervened and made the boundaries

    certain, the line between ourselves and the Saxons passed almost in its whole extent through an open country,

    so that there was no end to the murders, thefts, and arsons on both sides. In this way the Franks became so

    embittered that they at last resolved to make reprisals no longer, but to come to open war with the Saxons.

    Accordingly, war was begun against them, and was waged for thirty-three successive years with great fury;

    more, however, to the disadvantage of the Saxons than of the Franks. It could doubtless have been brought to

    an end sooner, had it not been for the faithlessness of the Saxons. It is hard to say how often they were

    conquered, and, humbly submitting to the king, promised to do what was enjoined upon them, gave without

    hesitation the required hostages, and received the officers sent them from the king. They were sometimes so

    much weakened and reduced that they promised to renounce the worship of devils and to adopt Christianity;

    but they were no less ready to violate these terms than prompt to accept them, so that it is impossible to tell

    which came easier to them to do; scarcely a year passed from the beginning of the war without such changes

    on their part. But the king did not suffer his high purpose and steadfastness—firm alike in good and evil

    fortune—to be wearied by any fickleness on their part, or to be turned from the task that he had undertaken;

    on the contrary, he never allowed their faithless behavior to go unpunished, but either took the field against

    them in person, or sent his counts with an army to wreak vengeance and exact righteous satisfaction. At last,

    after conquering and subduing all who had offered resistance, he took ten thousand of those who lived on the

    banks of the Elbe, and settled them, with their wives and children, in many different bodies here and there in

    Gaul and Germany. The war that had lasted so many years was at length ended by their acceding to (acceptance

    of) terms offered by the king, which were renunciation of their national religious customs and the worship of

    devils, acceptance of the sacraments of the Christian religion, and union with the Franks to form one people.

    3. According to the biographer Einhard in his Vita Caroli Magni, who did the Saxons worship?

    ___________________________________________________________________________________

    4. What does Einhard say was the cause of war?

    ____________________________________________________________________________________

    5. At the end of the reading, what does Einhard say were the three conditions which were demanded by the

    Franks and must be fulfilled by the Saxons to end the war?

    ____________________________________________________________________________________

  • History 7: Medieval Europe

    March 30-April 3

    4

    ____________________________________________________________________________________

    Concluding interpretive questions:

    Why did Charlemagne go to war with the Saxons? In what ways might it have been beneficial to the Franks for

    the Saxons to become Christians?

    ________________________________________________________________________

    ________________________________________________________________________

    ________________________________________________________________________

    ________________________________________________________________________

    ________________________________________________________________________

    ________________________________________________________________________

    ________________________________________________________________________

    ________________________________________________________________________

    ________________________________________________________________________

  • History 7: Medieval Europe

    March 30-April 3

    5

    Tuesday, March 31

    History Unit: The Rise of the Frankish Kingdom

    Lesson 5: The Coronation of Charlemagne

    Lesson 5 Socratic Guiding Question: Keep this question in mind as you study!

    What does it symbolically mean for a pope to crown an emperor? What are the advantages and disadvantages of

    having a united Church and State?

    Objective: Be able to do this by the end of this lesson.

    1. Explain the causes and effects of Charlemagne’s coronation by Pope Leo III.

    Introduction to Lesson 5

    By the late 700s, the pope in Rome was not only a spiritual leader, but he was also a political leader. He was the

    ruler of a small area in Italy called the Papal States, which you may remember had been given to him by Pepin

    the Short. “Papal” means “of or belonging to the pope”. The Papal States were being threatened by a group of

    barbarians in Northern Italy called the Lombards. The Lombards were Arians, so they did not like the pope. The

    pope is having great difficulty defending his land from the Lombards. What can he do? Let’s pause here and

    look at a