Historical Banqueting

  • View
    185

  • Download
    6

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Historical Banqueting. CM226 Catering and Event Management Chapter 1, pages 1-28. CHAPTER OBJECTIVES. Explain the development of the banquet menu . Explain the transformation of the menu to the nine course format Describe how European banqueting is reflected in American banqueting . - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript

Historical Banqueting

Historical BanquetingCM226 Catering and Event ManagementChapter 1, pages 1-28

Summary:Modern banqueting has its roots in the traditions of the Greeks and Romans. The Greeks introduced the hors doeuvre course, to which the Romans added up to 20 courses as they furthered the development of the banquet feast. From this elaborate format evolved the three-course medieval menu, which presented as many as 25 menu items with each course.The menu format revisions of the late-eighteenth and nineteenth centuries transformed the three primary courses with multiple dishes into a series of nine courses, each featuring an individual menu item. These revisions were incorporated into menus throughout Europe and America in a variety of formats.The history of American banqueting begins with the feasts of the Native America s. The menu formats of early colonial America banquets were primarily influenced by England. French cuisine and menu formats initially threaded their way to the colonies via English recipes and customs. The emigration of both French cuisine and menus with American banqueting customs. Thomas Jefferson greatly added the development of American banqueting during this years in the White House. His simplification of the menu and emphasis on wines were major elements in the development of a style of banqueting that prevailed over the next 165 years of White House functions. During the presidency of John Kennedy, banquets were enhanced by contributions of Jacqueline Kennedy. Like Jefferson, Mrs. Kennedy preferred menus of simple elegance that concentrated on high quality of food and service.The records tracing the development of the banquet menu throughout the centuries provide a rich and exciting chronicle of food items, recipes, and traditions. Many of these food items and recipes endure in our contemporary food customs.

1CHAPTER OBJECTIVESExplain the development of the banquet menu.

Explain the transformation of the menu to the nine course format

Describe how European banqueting is reflected in American banqueting.2CHAPTER OBJECTIVESDiscuss how Thomas Jefferson aided in the development of American banqueting.

Explain how Jacqueline Kennedy influenced American banqueting. 3INTRODUCTION / BANQUETINGPart I

4The beginning of catering profession started in ancient civilizationsEgyptians filled their tombs with foodstuffs and cookware to supply then in the next worldEgyptians also covered their walls with murals depicting food preparation and table settings.

The beginning of the catering profession started in ancient civilizations.Egyptians filled their tombs with foodstuffs and cookware to supply them in the next world.Egyptians also covered their walls with murals depicting food preparation and table settings.5Art records of Greeks and Romans include depictions of banqueting, table customs, decorative arts and recipes

Written records of the Greeks and Romans focus on specific types of food eaten rather than the entire meals.

Art records of the Greeks and Romans include depictions of banqueting, table customs, decorative arts, and recipes.Written records of the Greeks and Romans focus on types of food eaten rather than entire meals.

65th Century ApiciusApicius is the title of a collection of Roman cookery recipes, usually thought to have been compiled in the late 4th or early 5th century AD and written in a language that is in many ways closer to Vulgar than Classical Latin.

5th century - Apicius reputedly writes the very first cook book titled De re conquinaria libri decem (Cuisine in Ten Books) in which sauces are prepared in much the same manner followed by the French up to 1955.Apicius is the title of a collection of Roman cookery recipes, usually thought to have been compiled in the late 4th or early 5th century AD and written in a language that is in many ways closer to Vulgar than to Classical Latin.

Apicius is a text to be used in the kitchen. In the earliest printed editions it was given the overall title De re coquinaria ("On the Subject of Cooking"), and was attributed to an otherwise unknown "Caelius Apicius", an invention based on the fact that one of the two manuscripts is headed with the words "API CAE". The name Apicius had long been associated with excessive love of food, apparently from the habits of an early bearer of the name. The most famous individual given this name because of his reputation as a gourmet was Marcus Gavius Apicius, who is sometimes mistakenly asserted to be the author of the book.

7Cooking &Dining in Ancient RomeIs a written collection of recipes dating back to 42 BC and AD 37.

Cooking and Dining in Ancient Rome is a collection of recipes dating back to 42 B.C. and A.D. 37. Greek banqueting features hors doeuvre trolley, a number of small portion dishes.

8Greek banqueting featured hors doeuvre trolley, and a number of small portion dishes.

Cooking and Dining in Ancient Rome is a collection of recipes dating back to 42 B.C. and A.D. 37. Greek banqueting features hors doeuvre trolley, a number of small portion dishes.

9Middle AgesThe Middle Ages of European history are a period in history which lasted for roughly a millennium, generally dated from the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century to the beginning of the Early Modern Period in the 16th century.

Middle Ages

The Middle Ages of European history (adjective form mediaeval or medieval) are a period in history which lasted for roughly a millennium, commonly dated from the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century to the beginning of the Early Modern Period in the 16th century. 10Middle Ages (continued)This period is marked by the division of Western Christianity in the Reformation, the rise of humanism in the Italian Renaissance, and the beginnings of European overseas expansion. Marked by the division of Western Christianity in the Reformation, the rise of humanism in the Italian Renaissance, and the beginnings of European overseas expansion. There is some variation in the dating of the edges of these periods which is due mainly to differences in specialization and focus of individual scholars.

The Middle Ages form the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three "ages": the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the modern period. The idea of such a periodization is attributed to Flavio Biondo, an Italian Renaissance humanist historian but commonly seen periodization ranges span the years ca.400476 AD (the sackings of Rome by the Visigoths to the deposing of Romulus Augustus)[1] to ca.14531517 (the Fall of Constantinople to the Protestant Reformation begun with Martin Luther's Ninety-Five Theses). Dates are approximate, and are based upon nuanced arguments; for other dating schemes and the reasoning behind them, see "periodization issues", below.

The Middle Ages witnessed the first sustained urbanization of northern and western Europe. Many modern European countries owe their origins to events unfolding in the Middle Ages; present European political boundaries are, in many regards, the result of the military and dynastic achievements during this tumultuous period.

Guilds are formed, with chefs beginning their long tradition of community.

1380

Guillaume Tirel Taillevent (1312-95) writes Le Viandier, one of the oldest cookbooks written in French, which provides a complete synthesis of all aspects of cookery in the fourteenth century. Its main contribution is considered to be its emphasis on spiced foods and sauces (predominantly saffron, ginger, pepper, and cinnamon), soups, and ragouts, which include the preparation of meat, poultry, game, and fish. (The heavy seasoning served the useful purpose of disguising the taste of stale or rotten food.) He served as the cook of Charles VII of France.

1390

Richard II of England's cooks write The Forme of Cury ("The Art of Cookery"), which emphasizes heavily seasoned dishes and recommends the liberal use of almond milk in cooking.

A fourteenth-century European guild manual described the early master chef this way: "He is a professional craftsman. He is a cook. He takes fowl from the air; fish from the waters; fruits, vegetables, and grain from the land; and animals that walk the earth, and through his skills and art transforms the raw product to edible food. He serves to sustain life in man, woman, and child. He has the sacred duty through his efforts and art to sustain and maintain the healthy bodies that God has given us to house our souls."

1475

De Honesta Voluptate ac Valetudine ("Honest Pleasure and Health"), the first printed cookbook, is published in Italy by Bartolomeo Sacchi Platina (1421-81).

1533

Italian princess Caterina de Medici marries the Duc d'Orleans (later Henri II) of France and arrives in France with her Florentine chefs in tow. They collectively give rise to Florentine influences on the classic French fare, including simplicity, elegance, more delicate spicing, and the addition of new ingredients, most notably spinach.

11The Banquet Hall. Part II

12Medieval PeriodThe roots of modern banqueting extend from the Medieval period

13th century meal service instructions for serving

Food Preparation Methods

The three course menu outlineExplain the roots of modern banqueting from the medieval period.13th century meal service instructions for serving.Food preparation methods.The three course menu outline.

13RENAISSANCE EUROPEAN BANQUETING.

Part III

The Renaissance (from French Renaissance, meaning "rebirth"; Italian: Rinascimento, from re- "again" and nascere "be born")[1] was a cultural movement that spanned roughly the 14th to