Herodotus - The History of The Persian Wars (part II)

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Herodotus - The History of The Persian Wars (The original text in ancient Greek language)

Text of Herodotus - The History of The Persian Wars (part II)

  • Univ. or

    |;|./ .

  • faa Iftf Title 0/ Vol. 11. / Herodulu

    GENEALOGICAL TABLE

    ACH/EMENID/E.INCLUDING THE MATERNAL PKDIGREE

    CYRUS.

    ii. 91. I 182.

    Hypermnestra

    .m.vi. S3.01.150.

    Stlfh. I Byz.

    ACH.EMENES

    Teispeus or Teispciibid. I

    Canibysesibid. I

    Cm

    1;.; ' Arinl'ianos

  • GENEA

    ACIINCLUDING

    JMHBut

  • LGrH5G2St *

    VOI

    COPIOUS NOTES,

    PARTLY COMPILED AND TRANSLATED, PARTLY ORIGINAL;

    EXAMINATION QUESTIONS, INDEXES, &c.

    BY CHARLES WILLIAM STOCKER, D.D.VICE-PRINCIPAL OF ST. ALBAN's HALL; LATE FELLOW OF ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE,

    OXFORD, AND PRINCIPAL OF ELIZABETH COLLEGE, GUERNSEY.

    FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES.

    IN TWO VOLUMES.

    VOL. II.

    SOLD BY LONGMAN, BALDWIN, WHITTAKER,

    AND ALL OTHER BOOKSELLERS.

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  • ARGUMENT OF THE SEVENTH BOOK.

    Egypt revolts : i. Davius names Xerxes for his successor, and dies in thr

    midst of preparations for war : iiiv. Xerxes is pressed to invade Greece

    by Mardouius, Deinaratus, and others: v. vi. The revolt is quelled : vii.Xerxes proposes in council an expedition against Greece ; Mardonius

    speaks in approval of the measure, which Artabanus opposes: viii xi.

    The king, in spite of a dream, changes bis determination ; the vision,appears again to him, and also to bis uncle, who now urges the invasion :xii xix. Great preparations ; Athos is dug through : xxxxv. Xerxesbegins his march. Pythius : xxvixxxi. The Hellespontine bridges aredestroyed by a storm, but rebuilt : xxxiixxxvi. March from Sardis toAbydos. Review of the forces. Conversation between the king and Ar-tabanus, who is left as viceroy : xxxvii liii. Passage over the bridges.March to Doriscus. Numbering of the army: livlx. Commanders-in-chief of the forces. The 'immortal' band: lxxxii. lxxxiii. Generalsof the cavalry: lxxxvii. lxxxviii. Triremes: lxxxix. Marines: xcvi.Commanders of the fleet : xcvii. Artemisia : xcix. Review of the army :c. Conversation of Xerxes with Demaratus : ciciv. Mascame?.

    Boges : cvcvii. March from Doriscus to Acanthus, the fleet coastingalong shore : cviiicxx. There the army and navy separate, and meet

    again at Therma : cxxicxxvii. Xerxes surveys the mouth of the Pe-neus : cxxviiicxxx. His heralds return ; none had been now sent to

    Sparta or Athens : cxxxi cxxxiii. Discord among the Greeks : cxxxviii.

    The Athenians were the saviuurs of Greece : cxxxix. Oracles ; whichThemistocles interprets : cxlcxliii. Preparations of the Greeks : cxliv

    cxlvii. Argos declines any alliance : cxlviii clii. Unsuccessful embassy

    to Gelon : cliii. clvi clxvii. Duplicity of the Corcyrseans : clxviii.

    Crete remains neutral : clxix. The Thessalians are necessitated to jointhe Persians: clsxiiclxxiv. The Greek congress resolves to defendThermopylae, and to station the fleet at Artemisium : clxxv clxxviii.

    Hostilities commence by sea : clxxix clxxxiii. Numerical strength ofthe invaders: clxxxivclxxxvii. A storm: clxxxviii cxci. Navalmanoeuvres : cxciicxcv. Xerxes marches to Trachis. A little bandunder Leonidas occupies the pass : cxcviccix. Battle of Thermopylx.

    Treachery of Epialtes. Fall of Leonidas. His countrymen sell their lives

    dearly. The Thebans are made slaves : ccxccxxxiii. Conversation ofXerxes and Demaratus : ccxxxiv ccxxxvii. The body of Leonidas is

    mutilated : ccxxxviii. Demaratus had sent to Sparta intelligence of this

    invasion : ccxxxix.

    Herod. Vol. II.

  • ... be - ' - , which appears preferable to the

    . ., Euripides Hel. 250. W. explanation by H. who gives instancesAnother instance occurs in of the similar use of sed enim in Latin,, v. 70. 71. and' , v. Virgil, . i. 23. Ovid, M. ix. 248. on70. LAU. Conjdonis habel te cura, ViG. viii, 1,6. If ihe adverb , in-Virgil, E. vii. 40. Ausonice curam stead of the conjunction , hadgentis habere deos, Ovid, T. v. 2, 48. followed after ', then

    15. ] in preference to would have referred to himself. M. G. G. 575, 2. , and yap to.

    16."] Eepfrjs, i 18. ] i. 214. ol, ix., , 70. Compare vol. i. p. 142. n. 45.\, Aspasius, on p. 92. n. 77. M. G . G. 268. obs. andArist. Eth. p. 124. According to vol. i. p. 158. n. 97.Hellatiicus, she was the first woman 19.] devolved,

    ever wrote letters. L. occurs in this sense i. 109. vii. 205. S.17. yap] The ellipsis may be Verbs compounded with are more

    thus supplied,' oh- frequently used ; vol. i. p. 74. n. 87., yap, 20.] ,- 66cc. A similar ellipsis occurs in ' vlbs, '

    yap, . 120. ST and in- ? ' ,, ' , Ctesias, . 20.yap, Arrian, . . 6. ; here V.

  • //

    LIBER Ml. CAP. VI.

    , os , bt \-, ', 1 )' M," OUKM

    ear* 7''/$, ?'); *, '/ -"btKas , ,' * be >,

    tus,, Tts \ ."

    *' be, " , ku) bevbpea, ~& ,

    ,."VI. ,|

    J,

    , be, ' ~

    8 ' , '9 -

    21.] c 6. kept harping upon,stuck to, . on Vic. v. 7, 15.

    22.] my lord and master.LAI'. Vol. i. p. 55. n. C9. TheGreeks called their kinjs &vaicres, andthe gods; vol.i. p. 11 1. n. 89.,, Xenophon, An. iii.2, 3. L.

    23. ] with an infinitive, afternegative propositions or verbs, is equi-valent to the Latin quin or quo minus ;iii. 51. ix. 12. M. G. G. (p. 952.)608.

    24.] Vol. i. p. 182. n. 78.opposed to. quum videretefferato militia amnios, mitigandumferocem populum armorum desuetudineratus, Livy, i. 19.

    25.] 4s ;i.e. ovros 6 -. ST.

    26.] in point of excellence;vol. i. p. 245. n. 37. for may bedefined, , $\ " %v' >. So\ -,Melopus in Stob. p. 7, 11. V.

    27 .] co- operated iciih. Had

    been omitted, thisverb would have required -

    instead of is 2> . S. ST.2S. ] Understand, S. conspiring to aid him. Theverb might have been omit-ted, and changed to.ST.

    29.] c. 130. 5. Pausa-nias, vii. 10. The ire5es' aresaid to be,, !-, ix. 58. where they are calledLarissasans. The family was still rlo-rishing at Larissa in the times of Platoand of Demosthenes, ''-, -' ' -

    -,)) , Cri-tias in Ath. xii. 33. W. V. Aleas, orAlcvas, was nominated king of Thes-salv by the Pythian oracle ; Plutarch,t. ii. p. 492. a. He is called Laris-8(eus by Ovid, lb. 325.

    , Aris-totle, P. v. G L. In the words imme-diately following these we should per-haps read % (instead of

  • HERODOTI

    Xeovro, * , \ ,'oi be ' be, Ylei-^ ol at es ^., re -, ku\ 'Wevabai, bi) npos en

    3i , %, civbpa ',-bav 3: ,' '

    -os e, '34 35 es '

    , \. 3^ Ti)s&. 3" bio' "$,. be$, es ,$,

    3$ el ajfiiiXpu ~,ohbev 6 be, ,

    ws ' ' ui'bpos, re. 40 euro's bij^,& Xba* obvo.

    ). Simus is mentioned in Har-pocration (ex Demosth. p. 142, SO.IT.) as one of the Aleuadie, who wasconsidered to be in the Macedonianinterests.

    30. ~\ the utmost.31. icpoaopeyovro] Vol. i. p. 76. n.8.

    they applied themselves to, they pressedthe king. S.

    32.'] editor, Valla ; vender.GR., to expose for sale.i. I., L'lpian. L.

    33. V] in the very act :literally, ' ', being de-rived from "a thief;" Moscho-pulus. It was afterwards used of anyflagrant crime. Vig. iii. 3, 9.

    34.] Lasus, a poet and mu-sician, of Hermione in Argolis, wasreckoned by some as one of the sevenwise men of Greece. Vol. i. p. 16.n. 16. He instituted the Cyclic chorusand invented the dithyrambus. L.Aristophanes mentions him, V. 1410,1411. and many further particularsrespecting him will be found in thenote of Florens Christianus.

    35.] Pausanias, ii. p. 171.\, ,. V. Similar interpolationsare noticed by POR. on Eur. O. 5.5.

    36.] In oblique speech,after ws and otj, the optative is used

    ;

    and a future action is not always ex-pressed by the future tense. M. G. G.529, 2.

    37. . ttjs] . . ., c. 235. -. . . , Plato, Tim.

    p. 25. d. .38.$~\ is thus formed

    ;-

    oVeiOS, by crasis !, by paren-thesis. Another form is

    by antithesis from-vos. S.

    39. ] the prophecies.The genitive is put, even with verbswhich govern the accusative, when theaction does not refer to the whole ob-ject, but to a part only. M. G. G. 356.b.

    40.] Sometimes, whentwo actions are expressed, one of

  • LIBER VII. CAP. VIII. 7

    VII. be ',, ,\ . -, 41 bo\opv*~ *, y, , ,

    be. 43

    44 , .VIII.$ bk' , $ ~%

    ', 45, " ,')} . 1. 'ils -,

    ' 46 " "Avbpes, rorbe', apab,^\\s \). -, oba 47,^ *9which has a greater extent, and theother is confined to itself, tbe latter isput in the participle, where we shouldhave put the finite verb. M. G. G.555. obi. 1.

    41.] ., i. 77. -., iii. 103. W.

    42.] Comparatives andsuperlatives of substantives, which areused in an adjective sense, and which,for the most part, are properly ad-jectives, are of common occurrence.M. G. G. 133. obs. 2.

    43.] iii. 15. 82. viii.127. In later writers, Dio Cassius,Dionysius of H., and Appian, it go-verns sometimes a genitive, and some-times an accusative, of the province,Sec. presided over; and, in Appian,a dative of the person, on whose be-half the authority is exercised. S.( , Xeno-phon, H. iii. 1, 10.

    44] twenty-two yearsafter this, in the reign of Artaxerxes,B. C. 4G4. iii. 12. L. Thucydides, i.101. WA.

    45. ] An extra-ordinary assembly of the people atAthens was called -, Demosthenes, Cor. 12. and JEs-chines; ordinary assemblies were call-ed : the assembly of the Ar-

    gives is called , Euri-pides, . 721. and, G05. The popular assembly inHomer is called, II. . 51. whichwas sometimes preceded by, 53. apocletos(,JEtoli) vacant sanctius consilium (c.arcanum gentis, 35.) : ex delectis con-stat viris, opposed to consilium uni-verse? gentis, lAvj, xxxv. 34.-rbs, 2, Ilesychius ; -, Sophocles, An. 1C5. oi, Herodian, vii. 7,2.[r] V.D.

    40.] Dionysius of H. has turn-ed the wh