Greek Superstitions. Like in any other country, Greek people have their own superstitions. These can be similar to some superstitions that are found in.

  • Published on
    13-Jan-2016

  • View
    212

  • Download
    0

Transcript

<ul><li><p>Greek Superstitions</p></li><li><p>Greek Superstitions Like in any other country , Greek people have their own superstitions . These can be similar to some superstitions that are found in other cultures.</p></li><li><p>Some of the most popular:If you break a mirror, you will have 7 years bad luck. Many also believe that if you look at the mirror after midnight, great evil will find you. Rabbit foot is believed to bring good luck in general.Its bad luck to count the stars. However, If you see a falling star , make a wish!Black cats are said to bring bad luck. On the other hand, ladybugs bring good luck.</p></li><li><p>DatesFor Greeks, the unlucky days are Tuesday 13th and Friday 13th. In general , the number 13 is considered unlucky in any case. This superstition can be found in many other countries as well.</p></li><li><p>What about dragees ?If are single person and you put the dragees from a wedding under your pillow before you sleep, you will dream the person that you will get married to. </p></li><li><p>Salt makes unwelcome visitors leave. All you need is to shoot a little behind their back. It is also customary to sprinkle salt in a new home before you occupy it, as the salt will drive any evil out and away from you and your family. </p></li><li><p>The evil eye The evil eye is a superstition believed by many Greeks. Has it ever happened to you to spill your coffee down on you ,while wearing your favourite dress, after someone complimented you ? Have you ever bought a beautiful vase that broke right after your friend told you how nice it was? Thats how the term evil eye could be explained. </p></li><li><p>Ways to protect yourself from the evil eyeEyes that are like charms, blue in colour with an eye painted on them to reflect the evil are sold in Greece and you wear them on a necklace or a bracelet. Blue is the colour that wards off the evil of the eye, but it is also commonly thought that blue eyed people are exceptional givers of it. So beware when a blue eyed person pays you a compliment, according to the superstition, it could be disastrous. </p></li><li><p>The expression touch redWhen two people say the same thing together at the same time, they immediately say touch red one to another and both have to touch any red item they can find around them. This happens because Greeks believe that saying the same thing is an omen and that the two persons will get into a fight or an argument if they don't touch something red. </p></li><li><p>SneezingSneezing means that someone is talking or thinking about you. You can ask someone to give you a 3 digit number. Count each digit together and then find the corresponding letter in the alphabet. This letter is supposed to be the initial of the person that is talking about you. </p></li><li><p>Scissors If a pregnant sits on open scissors unintentionally, she will give birth to a boy. If you leave them open you will soon have an argument with somebody. </p></li><li><p>MoneyGreeks believe that Money attracts money, so never leave your pockets, purses or wallets completely empty and never completely empty your bank account. Always leave at least a coin or two. It is also considered good luck that when you give a gift of a wallet or a purse, that you put a coin or two in it before giving it to the recipient. </p></li><li><p>ShoesOverturned shoes (soles up) are considered very bad luck and even omens of death. Never let your shoes lay upside down. If you accidentally take them off and they land soles up, turn them over immediately and say Skorda (garlic) and a spit or two wont hurt either. </p></li><li><p>Thank you for your time and attention,</p><p>Amalia Triantou</p></li><li><p>Information:http://www.faliraki-info.com/susie/superstitions/greek-traditions.htmwww.greeka.comhttp://blogs.transparent.com/greek/greek-superstitions/http://realcorfu.com/greek-superstitions-customs-and-traditions/</p></li></ul>

Recommended

View more >