Gluteal Region/ Post Thigh MF Dauzvardis, Nov. 2010

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  • Gluteal Region/ Post Thigh MF Dauzvardis, Nov. 2010
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  • OBTURATOR INTERNUS ORIGIN Inner surface of obturator membrane and rim of pubis and ischium bordering membrane INSERTION Middle part of medial aspect of greater trochanter of femur ACTION laterally rotates and stabilizes hip NERVE Nerve to obturator internus (L5, S1,2)
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  • INSERTION Middle part of medial aspect of greater trochanter of femur ACTION laterally rotates and stabilizes hip NERVE Nerve to obturator internus (L5, S1, 2) GEMELLUS SUPERIOR ORIGIN Spine of ischium
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  • ORIGIN Upper border of ischial tuberosity INSERTION Middle part of medial aspect of greater trochanter of femur ACTION laterally rotates and stabilizes hip NERVE Nerve to quadratus femoris (L4, 5, S1) GEMELLUS INFERIOR
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  • Sacrotuberous Ligament
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  • Sacrospinous Ligament
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  • ORIGIN 2, 3, 4 costotransverse bars of anterior sacrum, few fibers from superior border of greater sciatic notch INSERTION Anterior part of medial aspect of greater trochanter of femur ACTION laterally rotates and stabilizes hip NERVE Anterior primary rami of S1, 2 PIRIFORMIS
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  • ORIGIN Outer surface of ilium between middle and inferior gluteal lines INSERTION Anterior surface of greater trochanter of femur ACTION Abducts and medially rotates hip. Tilts pelvis on walking. NERVE Superior gluteal nerve (L4, 5, S1) GLUTEUS MINIMUS
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  • ORIGIN Outer surface of ilium between posterior and middle gluteal lines INSERTION Posterolateral surface of greater trocanter of femur ACTION Abducts and medially rotates hip. Tilts pelvis on walking NERVE Superior gluteal nerve (L4,5,S1) GLUTEUS MEDIUS
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  • QUADRATUS FEMORIS ORIGIN Lateral border of ischial tuberosity INSERTION Quadrate tubercle of femur and a vertical line below this to the level of lesser trocanter ACTION laterally rotates and stabilizes hip NERVE Nerve to quadratus femoris (and obturator internus) (L4, 5, S1)
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  • Gluteus Maximus
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  • ORIGIN Outer surface of anterior iliac crest between tubercle of the iliac crest and anterior superior iliac spine INSERTION Iliotibial tract (anterior surface of lateral condyle of tibia) ACTION Maintains knee extended (assists gluteus maximus) and abducts hip NERVE Superior gluteal nerve (L4, 5, S1) TENSOR FASCIA LATA
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  • Lumen Learnem
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  • The cruciate anastomosis is an anastomosis in the upper thigh of the inferior gluteal artery, the lateral and medial circumflex femoral arteries, and the first perforating artery of the profunda femoris artery. The first perforating artery is the artery that provides blood to the cruciate anastomosis. The cruciate anastomosis is clinically relevent because if there is a blockage between the femoral artery and external iliac artery, blood can reach the the popliteal artery by means of the anastomosis. The route of blood is through the internal iliac, to the inferior gluteal artery, to a perforating branch of the deep femoral artery, to the lateral circumflex femoral artery, then to its descending branch into the superior lateral genicular artery and thus into the popliteal artery. inferior gluteal arterylateralmedial circumflex femoral arteriesperforating arteryprofunda femorislateral circumflex femoral arterysuperior lateral genicular arterypopliteal artery Wikipedia
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