Click here to load reader

Global Alliance of Justice Educators, July 2011 Michele Leering Executive Director/Lawyer - Community Advocacy & Legal Centre Belleville, Ontario, Canada

  • View
    220

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

Text of Global Alliance of Justice Educators, July 2011 Michele Leering Executive Director/Lawyer -...

  • Slide 1
  • Global Alliance of Justice Educators, July 2011 Michele Leering Executive Director/Lawyer - Community Advocacy & Legal Centre Belleville, Ontario, Canada [email protected] Reflective practitioner Critically reflective practitioner Self- reflective practitioner Encouraging reflective practice at law school: A conceptual model and promising practices
  • Slide 2
  • Introduction to Reflective Practice Reflecting on the value of reflection Understanding benefits and outcomes Developing a working conceptualization Sharing methods and promising practices GAJE workshop engages in collective reflective practice!
  • Slide 3
  • Key messages from Key messages from Encouraging reflective practice at law school: A conceptual model and promising practices Reflection is critical for learning Reflective practice is an important capability at every stage of professional development (student professional) Facilitating reflective capacity early and pervasively benefits everyone Access to justice requires reflective practice I think it is actually cutting edge, it ought to be explored. Research participant
  • Slide 4
  • What is reflection? reflection in the context of learning is a generic term for those intellectual and affective activities in which individuals engage to explore their experiences in order to lead to new understandings and appreciation. It may take place in isolation or in association with others. David Boud, Rosemary Keogh and David Walker, eds., Reflection: Turning Experience into Learning (New York: Kogan Page Ltd., 1985) at 19.
  • Slide 5
  • What is reflection? Reflection is a basic mental process with either a purpose, an outcome, or both, applied in situations in which material is unstructured or uncertain and where there is no obvious solution. Jennifer A. Moon, Reflection in Learning and Professional Development: Theory & Practice (Sterling, Virginia: Kogan Page, 1999) at 10.
  • Slide 6
  • What is reflection? We are inclined to think of reflection as something quiet and personal. My argument here is that reflection is action- oriented, social and political. Its product is praxis (informed, committed action), the most eloquent and socially significant form of human action. Stephen Kemmis, Action Research and the Politics of Reflection in David Boud, Rosemary Keogh and David Walker, eds., Reflection: Turning Experience into Learning (New York: Kogan Page Ltd., 1985) 139 at 141.
  • Slide 7
  • Potential Outcomes from Reflective Practice Mind Map # 1 A more effective adult learner Healthier and happier student/professional Cultural competency Ethical development Sensitivity and commitment to social justice and access to justice issues Transformational learning perspective shift
  • Slide 8
  • More Potential Outcomes from Reflective Practice Mind Map # 1 Enhanced critical lawyering skills & capacities Efficient and effective legal professional Leadership capacity Holistic practitioner law as a healing profession Flexible and resilient colleague & professional
  • Slide 9
  • What is reflective practice? Quotes from the literature A reflective dialogue exercise
  • Slide 10
  • Views of Research Participants - Views of Research Participants - Encouraging reflective practice at law school: A conceptual model and promising practices A reflective practitioner is somebody who considers who they are, where they are, what theyre doing, their position in the community, the purpose of the work they are doing and how they are doing it, and takes it as an ongoing process of learning and moving forward a continuous iterative process The ability to engage in critical self- reflection about ones professional role and experiences is an important and learnable skill which is arguably the key to continuous learning throughout a lawyers career.
  • Slide 11
  • RP means for me the opportunity to reflect in a fairly systematic and intentional way about what has been done- what has worked, what hasnt worked, what was successful, why was it successful or not successful, and learn from that reflection, continually adjusting the practice in ways in which you will imagine, and it will be made better as a result of reflection...a bigger definition of RP has one reflect not simply on the skills that ones acquiring, whether its to think critically or analytically, or more effective questioner, listener or interviewer, but its to reflect on the role of law in society. Its to reflect on the implications that law will have on groups within society.
  • Slide 12
  • A working definition for reflective practice in legal education Encouraging reflective practice at law school: A conceptual model and promising practices
  • Slide 13
  • Reflective practitioner
  • Slide 14
  • technical think like a lawyer craft Schn professional discipline skill integrate theory & practice Reflective practitioner practical hands action learn from experience
  • Slide 15
  • Reflective practitioner technical think like a lawyer craft Schn professional discipline skill legal reasoning legal practice make tacit explicit integrate theory & practice practical instrumental single loop learning competency apprenticeship analytical artistry cognitive Learning from experience
  • Slide 16
  • Critically reflective practitioner
  • Slide 17
  • Critically reflective practitioner critique knowledge challenge the status quo intellectual law as a social construct critical legal studies head
  • Slide 18
  • critique knowledge challenge the status quo intellectual law as a social construct Critically reflective practitioner context liberal education critical race theory double loop learning (Arygris/Schn) practicing theorist (Buchanan) unpack assumptions & paradigms theoretical emancipation transformative Intellectuals (Giroux) enlargement of mind (Nedelsky/Arendt) deconstruct conscientization (Freire) critical legal studies head feminist analysis
  • Slide 19
  • Self-reflective practitioner
  • Slide 20
  • Self-reflective practitioner values moral commitment self-awareness personal ethics heart
  • Slide 21
  • Self-reflective practitioner values moral commitment self-awareness personal ethics insight introspection emotional and social intelligence philosophy of practice engagement self- regulating
  • Slide 22
  • Reflective practitioner Critically reflective practitioner Integrated Reflective Practitioner (IRP) Self-reflective practitioner engaged life-long learner ethical holistic authentic leadership new professional integrated knowledge, skills, values reflects collectively The aspirational vision An IRP is self-aware and can reflect on practice, knowledge and critical theory as a self-directed life- long learner, and takes action to improve his/her practice, and reflects in community
  • Slide 23
  • What does reflective practice mean to you? Increasingly, reflective practice is viewed not only as an action, but also as a way of being, an orientation, which must be cultivated. Willis as cited in Leona English, ed., International Encyclopedia of Adult Education (New York: Palgrave, 2005, 545)
  • Slide 24
  • If you had many members of the profession who were reflective practitioners, in particular self- reflective practitioners, I think you would actually see differences in what are accepted as the predominant norms of the profession itself. I think that its something we are going to hear more about and I think that law faculties that evolve to adopt these kinds of tools and methods will be better law faculties. Anybody who is more reflective is less likely to be a discourteous, uncivil professional Research participants views
  • Slide 25
  • Encouraging reflective practice at law school: A conceptual model and promising practices Methods to increase reflection: Mind Map # 2
  • Slide 26
  • Some methods - Research participants Learning contracts Learning plans Learning styles assessment Rubrics for self-assessment Debriefing OPIR group debriefs Experiential learning Group work Role plays Ethical ambassador Experiential (field trips, exercises, intensives) Problem-based learning Innovative use of novel Mind-mapping Reflective questions Syllabus expectation Use of metaphor Innovative teaching methods Co-curricular activities Critical reflection on readings Reflective writing Journaling Summaries of key learning points One minute papers Reflective essays Personal code of conduct Teaching portfolios
  • Slide 27
  • Methods to support reflection Mind Map # 2 Orientation Pre-orientation Reflective exercises Planning exercises Reflective writing Reflective questioning Self-awareness exercises Reading theory critically Experiential learning Actual Staged Innovative teaching methods Course offerings Graphic exercises Contemplative practices Debriefing exercises Consciousness-raising Aesthetic Mentoring programs Assessment & evaluation methods Group process Faculty models RP!
  • Slide 28
  • Opportunities at Law School to encourage reflection Encouraging reflective practice at law school: A conceptual model and promising practices
  • Slide 29
  • A pervasive approach Strategic alignment Law school admissions Experiential learning orientation Academic Success Program externships Faculty Modeling Learning outcomes / core competencies Courses Clinical Programs Assessment & Evaluation Career Services Department Faculty Professional Development Extra & co-curricular activities Strategic plan
  • Slide 30
  • Research participants: Feedback on how to encourage About 40 different ideas Law school PD forum, sharing promising practices & learning from one another were three of them Sensitivity to different personalities and teaching styles Need for annotated list of resources, literature review, tool kit, how to You cant grow, you cannot learn, you cannot shift, you cannot respond without self-reflection. Research participant
  • Slide 31
  • Closing key messages Use at least one method to encourage reflection Share your promising practices Build on existing promising practices Nurture your own reflective practice Create a community of practice Create new knowledge about teaching (scholarship about pedagogy, action research) Model reflective practice for students
  • Slide 32
  • How have you encouraged reflection? Small group discussion Reflection on practice (learning, skills, etc) Critical reflection Self-reflection
  • Slide 33
  • Resource Material to be available Introductory memo to Resource Kit materials Introduction & Working definition for RP Mind Maps: Benefits/Outcomes & Methods Annotated Resources & Bibliography (work in progress) Glossary of Terms (adult & higher ed lexicon) Ten Actions of a Reflective Practitioner (Kinsella, 2001) Collection of quotes to reflect on Matrix for planning reflective activities Where I want to Be Adapted from Fritz (1999) For more information: [email protected]
  • Slide 34
  • What does reflective practice mean to you? Parker J. Palmer, The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teachers Life (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998), p. 148 When I am at my best, my teaching is like a ___________.