1
764 I took a leading part in instituting the inquiry by Dr. Ballard, and I am willing to take the fullest share of any censure that may be passed for my want of co-operation. Dr. Ballard’s opinion will not alter my course of action. As for the other members of the profession, I leave them to speak for themselves. I think there cannot be two opi- nions as to the true course of action under conditions where a homoeopath is forced upon the profession. Yours faithfully, Halifax, April 20th, 1881. T. M. DOLAN, L.R.C.S. ED. T. M. DOLAN, L.R.C.S. ED. GLASGOW. (From our own Correspondent.) A TOLERABLY well attended public meeting of those favourable to the establishment of a hospital on the south side of the city was held a few days ago; the Hon. the Lord Provost was in the chair. Many of the large employers of labour in the southern districts were present, while the landed and other interests were well represented. It was unanimously resolved that, having regard to the insufficiency of accommodation in the existing infirmaries and to the great distance of these institutions from the southern districts, a public hospital of the kind desired should be erected in a suitable situation, and an influential committee was ap- pointed to further the scheme. All the speakers at this meeting were careful to state that they were carrying on the movement in no spirit of hostility to the infirmaries at present in existence. It is intended that a hospital of 120 beds shall be provided, and the sum which the committee aim at raising is about £30,000. Subscriptions are already coming in; one subscription of .E1000 is promised, and another of £500, and it is confidently expected that the Town Council of Glasgow will give a site, either free or at a nominal price. The prospects of the scheme are thus brighter than might have been expected. In the course of an introductory speech at the above meet- ing the Lord Provost gave some interesting antiquarian in- formation regarding the provision made by the Glasgow authorities for attendance on paupers in olden times. On 27th October, 1684, it is noted that, "considering the sad condition the town is in through the great debt it is resting owing, it is therefore concluded that the town shall make use of no person as the town’s physician or chirurgeon in time coming; and if any person is unwell and deserves to be cured, upon their applying to any of the magistrates, they are empowered to recommend them to any physician they shall think fit." Further, the magistrates seem to have retained the services of a person skilled in lithotomy, for it is recorded that " a certificate having been produced in favour of Duncan Campbell, and subscribed by the haill doctors and most part of the chirurgeons in town, of his dexterity and success, they appoint Duncan to operate on the poor in place of Evir M’Neil, who is become unfit to do the same through his infirmity." A case which has just been tried at the Glasgow Circuit Court, in which two warders were charged with murdering a lunatic pauper patient in Merryflatts Asylum, presents some points of interest. In the first place, a recently recovered lunatic, who was a patient in the asylum, was examined as a witness. The presiding judge said that this was a novelty in his experience, and that though this man’s evidence was given clearly and without hesitation, he would not believe it unless it were corroborated. He was, never- theless, not disposed to deal with the witness’s statements as delusive, but thought rather that the substance of his evidence was true. In connexion with this point, it may be stated that at the Sheriff Criminal Court in Inverary, a few weeks ago, the Sheriff convicted and punished solely on the evidence of a lunatic. The evidence of Dr. Jas. Dunlop in the Merryflatts case contained a statement that it is not his practice, in dissecting a body, to open all the great cavities after finding a sufficient cause of death in one to do more would mutilate a body, and the instructions of the Crown are to conduct post-mortems with judgment and discretion. Another medical witness expressed surprise that in the post- mortem examination of a man suffering from acute mania no examination of the brain had been made. PARIS. (From our own Correspondent.) THE tenth annual meeting of the French Association ior the Advancement of Science was held last month at Algiers, the opening address being delivered by M. Chauveau. of Lyons. Prefacing his discourse by a suitable compliment to the courage of the soldiers who had conquered the country, and to the valour of the colonists who had patriotically in. creased and multiplied in spite of climatic difficulties, -)I, Chauveau began the work of the Congress by an interesting communication on ’’ Ferments and Virus." In the medical section, the first mention is due to a paper by Professor Verneuil, on "The Surgical Aspects of Malaria." 1I Verneuil thinks that the baneful influence of this poison is is net sufficiently recognised by operatives. It may give rise to a number of apparently spontaneous external affections; it may unfavourably modify the progress of intercurrent or pre-existent surgical diseases ; it may arrest or delay the healing of wounds, giving rise to complications of different kinds, which render the prognosis more than usually nn- favourable. Traumatism in its turn reacts upon malaria, bringing it out or reawakening it in individuals in whom it would otherwise have been dormant. M. Milliot related the salutary effects produced by the drainage of Lake Fetzara, terminated last year, shown both by statistics and the decrease in the consumption of quinine. M. Landowski gave an instance of the haemostatic properties of warm water. A patient suffering from uncontrollable haemorrhage, due to internal and external haemorrhoids, was placed in a hip. bath, containing water at a temperature of 35° Centigrade, This was allowed to flow freely into the rectum by means of a small speculum, and the temperature was gradually in. creased to 40°. After a quarter of an hour the bleeding had stopped, and did not recur. M. Henrot of Rheims read a paper advocating the treatment of Vasculo-cystic Goitre by Capillary Electrolysis, and quoted a case in support of this method. Amongst the more strictly medical communica. tions, one of great interest was made by MM. Joffroy and Hanot on Rapidly Developed Bulbar Symptoms in Locomo. tor Ataxia. In one case, which the author had seen with Professor Charcot, the usual symptoms of ataxia had been wanting, a few characteristic pains only having been noticed. The patient was suddenly seized with snuflling, and at the next meal liquids returned by the nose, solid food being swallowed only after several efforts. General anaesthesia of the face, with patches of analgesia, were then discovered. The sense of taste was also affected, no distinction being made between wine, water, and milk, nor between different kinds of meat. Three months after there was incomplete facial paralysis on the right side, and two months later com. plete absence of tendon-reflex, paralysis of the bladder, loss of genital power, and large patches of anaesthesia on dif. ferent parts of the body and limbs. There was, however, no motor coordination, and equilibrium was not disturbed by closing the eyes. Under the influence of ergot, hydro- therapy, and galvanism, a great improvement was effected in a few months, the bulbar symptoms disappearing almost en. tirely. In a second case, a man aged fifty, a few symptoms of ataxia had existed for a short time, when extreme weak- ness with motor incoordination was observed, and at the same time double facial paralysis. On the following days there were loss of muscular sense, paralysis of bladder and rectum, and darting pains in the limbs. Considerableimprovenieiit was effected in a few weeks. Amemoir by M. Ziegler of Genevaon Magnetic Radiation was presented to the Congress by M. Carl Vogt. M. Ziegler believes that he has discovered that two magnetised bars of metal, joined together in a certain manner, produce certain definite effects upon animals sub- mitted to experimentation, which differ according to the angle of intersection. One of these bars can be replaced by terrestrial magnetism. It is concluded that terrestrial magnetism radiates in the same way as light or heat, and that its rays are refracted in passing through ctrtain bodies, such as crystals and iron. The physiological efect of magnetism can be shown by concentrating its rays through a lens of soft iron on the heart of a rabbit, when circulatory disturbances will occur. Violent peristaltic movements arc provoked by focusing in the same way the magnetic rays on the intestines. M. Vogt states that he has himself observed the effects produced on the bowel, and, without

GLASGOW

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: GLASGOW

764

I took a leading part in instituting the inquiry by Dr.Ballard, and I am willing to take the fullest share of anycensure that may be passed for my want of co-operation.Dr. Ballard’s opinion will not alter my course of action.As for the other members of the profession, I leave themto speak for themselves. I think there cannot be two opi-nions as to the true course of action under conditions wherea homoeopath is forced upon the profession.

Yours faithfully,Halifax, April 20th, 1881. T. M. DOLAN, L.R.C.S. ED.T. M. DOLAN, L.R.C.S. ED.

GLASGOW.(From our own Correspondent.)

A TOLERABLY well attended public meeting of thosefavourable to the establishment of a hospital on the southside of the city was held a few days ago; the Hon. theLord Provost was in the chair. Many of the large employersof labour in the southern districts were present, while thelanded and other interests were well represented. It was

unanimously resolved that, having regard to the insufficiencyof accommodation in the existing infirmaries and to the greatdistance of these institutions from the southern districts, apublic hospital of the kind desired should be erected in asuitable situation, and an influential committee was ap-pointed to further the scheme. All the speakers at thismeeting were careful to state that they were carrying on themovement in no spirit of hostility to the infirmaries at

present in existence. It is intended that a hospital of 120beds shall be provided, and the sum which the committeeaim at raising is about £30,000. Subscriptions are alreadycoming in; one subscription of .E1000 is promised, andanother of £500, and it is confidently expected thatthe Town Council of Glasgow will give a site, eitherfree or at a nominal price. The prospects of the schemeare thus brighter than might have been expected. Inthe course of an introductory speech at the above meet-ing the Lord Provost gave some interesting antiquarian in-formation regarding the provision made by the Glasgowauthorities for attendance on paupers in olden times. On27th October, 1684, it is noted that, "considering the sadcondition the town is in through the great debt it is restingowing, it is therefore concluded that the town shall makeuse of no person as the town’s physician or chirurgeon intime coming; and if any person is unwell and deserves tobe cured, upon their applying to any of the magistrates,they are empowered to recommend them to any physicianthey shall think fit." Further, the magistrates seem tohave retained the services of a person skilled in lithotomy,for it is recorded that " a certificate having been producedin favour of Duncan Campbell, and subscribed by the hailldoctors and most part of the chirurgeons in town, of hisdexterity and success, they appoint Duncan to operate onthe poor in place of Evir M’Neil, who is become unfit to dothe same through his infirmity."A case which has just been tried at the Glasgow Circuit

Court, in which two warders were charged with murderinga lunatic pauper patient in Merryflatts Asylum, presentssome points of interest. In the first place, a recentlyrecovered lunatic, who was a patient in the asylum, wasexamined as a witness. The presiding judge said that thiswas a novelty in his experience, and that though this man’sevidence was given clearly and without hesitation, he wouldnot believe it unless it were corroborated. He was, never-theless, not disposed to deal with the witness’s statementsas delusive, but thought rather that the substance of hisevidence was true. In connexion with this point, it may bestated that at the Sheriff Criminal Court in Inverary, a fewweeks ago, the Sheriff convicted and punished solely on theevidence of a lunatic. The evidence of Dr. Jas. Dunlop inthe Merryflatts case contained a statement that it is not hispractice, in dissecting a body, to open all the great cavitiesafter finding a sufficient cause of death in one to do morewould mutilate a body, and the instructions of the Crown are to conduct post-mortems with judgment and discretion.Another medical witness expressed surprise that in the post-mortem examination of a man suffering from acute maniano examination of the brain had been made.

PARIS.

(From our own Correspondent.)

THE tenth annual meeting of the French Association iorthe Advancement of Science was held last month at Algiers,the opening address being delivered by M. Chauveau. of

Lyons. Prefacing his discourse by a suitable compliment tothe courage of the soldiers who had conquered the country,and to the valour of the colonists who had patriotically in.creased and multiplied in spite of climatic difficulties, -)I,Chauveau began the work of the Congress by an interestingcommunication on ’’ Ferments and Virus." In the medicalsection, the first mention is due to a paper by Professor

Verneuil, on "The Surgical Aspects of Malaria." 1IVerneuil thinks that the baneful influence of this poison is isnet sufficiently recognised by operatives. It may give riseto a number of apparently spontaneous external affections;it may unfavourably modify the progress of intercurrent orpre-existent surgical diseases ; it may arrest or delay thehealing of wounds, giving rise to complications of differentkinds, which render the prognosis more than usually nn-favourable. Traumatism in its turn reacts upon malaria,bringing it out or reawakening it in individuals in whom itwould otherwise have been dormant. M. Milliot relatedthe salutary effects produced by the drainage of LakeFetzara, terminated last year, shown both by statisticsand the decrease in the consumption of quinine. M. Landowskigave an instance of the haemostatic properties of warm water.A patient suffering from uncontrollable haemorrhage, dueto internal and external haemorrhoids, was placed in a hip.bath, containing water at a temperature of 35° Centigrade,This was allowed to flow freely into the rectum by means ofa small speculum, and the temperature was gradually in.creased to 40°. After a quarter of an hour the bleeding hadstopped, and did not recur. M. Henrot of Rheims read apaper advocating the treatment of Vasculo-cystic Goitre byCapillary Electrolysis, and quoted a case in support of thismethod. Amongst the more strictly medical communica.tions, one of great interest was made by MM. Joffroy andHanot on Rapidly Developed Bulbar Symptoms in Locomo.tor Ataxia. In one case, which the author had seen withProfessor Charcot, the usual symptoms of ataxia had beenwanting, a few characteristic pains only having been noticed.The patient was suddenly seized with snuflling, and at thenext meal liquids returned by the nose, solid food beingswallowed only after several efforts. General anaesthesia ofthe face, with patches of analgesia, were then discovered.The sense of taste was also affected, no distinction beingmade between wine, water, and milk, nor between differentkinds of meat. Three months after there was incompletefacial paralysis on the right side, and two months later com.plete absence of tendon-reflex, paralysis of the bladder, lossof genital power, and large patches of anaesthesia on dif.ferent parts of the body and limbs. There was, however, nomotor coordination, and equilibrium was not disturbed byclosing the eyes. Under the influence of ergot, hydro-therapy, and galvanism, a great improvement was effected ina few months, the bulbar symptoms disappearing almost en.tirely. In a second case, a man aged fifty, a few symptomsof ataxia had existed for a short time, when extreme weak-ness with motor incoordination was observed, and at thesame time double facial paralysis. On the following days therewere loss of muscular sense, paralysis of bladder and rectum,and darting pains in the limbs. Considerableimprovenieiit waseffected in a few weeks. Amemoir by M. Ziegler of GenevaonMagnetic Radiation was presented to the Congress by M.Carl Vogt. M. Ziegler believes that he has discovered thattwo magnetised bars of metal, joined together in a certainmanner, produce certain definite effects upon animals sub-mitted to experimentation, which differ according to theangle of intersection. One of these bars can be replacedby terrestrial magnetism. It is concluded that terrestrialmagnetism radiates in the same way as light or heat, andthat its rays are refracted in passing through ctrtainbodies, such as crystals and iron. The physiological efectof magnetism can be shown by concentrating its rays througha lens of soft iron on the heart of a rabbit, when circulatorydisturbances will occur. Violent peristaltic movements arcprovoked by focusing in the same way the magnetic rayson the intestines. M. Vogt states that he has himselfobserved the effects produced on the bowel, and, without