Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29 William Shakespeare 1564-1616 Sonnet 29.

  • Published on
    11-Jan-2016

  • View
    212

  • Download
    0

Transcript

  • William Shakespeare1564-1616Sonnet 29

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • What Is The Poet Saying?First Two QuatrainsFunction as self-reflectionWhen in disgrace with fortune and mens eyesI all alone beweep my outcast state(1-2)Considers himself to be isolatedBad luckLonely

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • What Is The Poet Saying?And trouble deaf Heaven with my bootless cries (3)bootless criesFutile prayersdeaf HeavenHeaven does not hear or respond to his prayers

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • What Is The Poet Saying?And look upon myself and curse my fate,Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,Featured like him, like him with friends possessed,Desiring this mans art and that mans scope (4-7)

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • What Is The Poet Saying?Curses his bad luck (that he is who he is)Wishes to be someone elsewith friends possesseddemonstrates the poets lonelinessdemonstrates the poets desire for companionship

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • What Is The Poet Saying?With what I most enjoy contented least (8)What he most enjoys is most absent in his life

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • Third QuatrainVoltaChange in perspectiveYet in these thoughts myself almost despising,Haply I think on thee, and then my state,Like to the lark at break of day arisingFrom sullen earth, sings hymns at Heavens gate.(9-12)

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • Third QuatrainAs the poet begins to hate himself, he thinks about his friendHis mood and perspective immediately changesImageryLarkDaybreakHymnsHeavens gateAll positive, uplifting images

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • Couplet For thy sweet love remembered such wealth bringsThat then I scorn to change my state with kings. (13-14)Once he thinks of his friend, he considers himself to be extremely wealthyIn fact, once he begins to think of his friend, he would not trade places with a king

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • Poetic DevicesShakespearean SonnetRhyme Schemeabab cdcd efef gg

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • Poetic DevicesShakespearean SonnetMeter

    When in disgrace with fortune and mens eyes

    Iambic Pentameter

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • Poetic DevicesImagery First two quatrainsNegative imageryCenters around lonelinessThird quatrainPositive imageryLark SingingHymns Heaven

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • Poetic DevicesSimile Wishing me like to one more rich in hope (5)Comparing himself to someone with better fortune

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • Poetic DevicesAlliterationYet in these thoughts (9)

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

  • Poetic DevicesTone First two quatrainsLonelinessThird quatrainHappiness

    Geschke/British Literature Shakespeare's Sonnet 29

Recommended

View more >