Geometrically Nonlinear Analysis

  • View
    168

  • Download
    14

Embed Size (px)

Text of Geometrically Nonlinear Analysis

  • COSM

    Contents

    1

    S

    C

    2

    3

    Orthotropic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2OSM Advanced Modules 1Introduction

    Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1Structural Nonlinearities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2

    Geometrical Nonlinearities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2Material Nonlinearities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2Contact (Boundary) Nonlinearities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4olution Procedures of Nonlinear Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4Solution Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4oncept of Time Curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6

    NSTAR: An Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6

    Geometrically Nonlinear Analysis

    Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1Large Displacement Nonlinear Analyses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2

    Finite Strain Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2Large Deflection Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3

    Material Models and Constitutive Relations

    Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1Linear Elastic Models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1

    Isotropic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1

  • Contents

    2 COS

    Laminated Composite and Failure Criterion for Laminated Compos-ites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3

    Laminated Composite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3Failure Criterion for Laminated Composite Materials . . . . . . . 3-3

    Nonlinear Elastic Model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5Hyperelastic Models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8MOSM Advanced Modules

    Mooney-Rivlin Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9Ogden Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12Blatz-Ko Model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15

    Plasticity Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17Huber-von Mises Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17Drucker-Prager Elastic-Perfectly Plastic Model . . . . . . . . . . 3-20Tresca-Saint Venant Yield Criterion(or the constant maximum shearing stress condition) . . . . . . 3-21Comparison of Tresca and von Mises Criteria for Plasticity . 3-23

    Superelastic Models: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24Nitinol Model (Shape-Memory-Alloy) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24The Nitinol Model Formulation: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25The Yield Criterion: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27The Flow Rule: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-28

    Creep and Viscoelastic Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30Creep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30Linear Isotropic Viscoelastic Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-32

    Wrinkling Membrane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-35A Bounding Surface Model for Concrete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-37

    Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-37Damage Coefficient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-38The Model Parameters and Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-39

    User-defined Material Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-42Preparing the NSTAR Executable File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43Requirements for Windows NT/2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43Model Definition Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44

  • Part 1 NSTAR / Advanced Dynamics Analysis

    Useful FUNCTION Statements to Access Information from Data Base3-48Useful COMMON Statements to Access Information From Data Base3-50 Element Nodal connectivity Common . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-54Useful Subroutines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-59

    U

    SA

    B

    4COSMOSM Advanced Modules 3

    ser-Defined Creep Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-60Model Definition Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-61Modifying the CREPUM Subroutine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-61train Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-64utomatic Determination of Material Properties from Test Data3-67MPCTYPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-67MPC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-69Evaluation Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-69Examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-70irth and Death of Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-82

    Gap/Contact Problems

    Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1Hybrid Technique for Gap/Contact Problems: General Description4-2

    Hybrid Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2Gap Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3Contact Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5

    GAP Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6Two-Node Gap Element (Node-to-Node Gap). . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6One-Node Gap Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9

    Automatic Generation of Gap Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12

    Contact/Gaps Enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15Triangular Sub-Surfaces for Target Surface . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15Automatic Soft Springs for Contact Source or Target . . . . . . 4-15

  • Contents

    4 COS

    A New Solution Strategy for Initial Interference . . . . . . . . . . 4-15Troubleshooting for Gap/Contact Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16

    5 Numerical ProceduresStatic Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1

    FBRMOSM Advanced Modules

    Incremental Control Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 Thermal Loading for Displacement/Arc Length Controls . . . . 5-4Iterative Solution Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4Line Search Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8Termination Schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9

    Dynamic Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11Rayleigh Damping Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13Concentrated Dampers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13Base Motion Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13Inclusion of Dead Loads in Dynamic Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14

    Adaptive Automatic Stepping Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15Step Size Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15Safe-guard Against Equilibrium Iteration Failures . . . . . . . . 5-15Safe-guard Against Converging to Incorrect Solutions . . . . . 5-16

    J-Integral Evaluation for Nonlinear Fracture Mechanics NLFM 5-17Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-18Modification for Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-19Axisymmetric Formulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-19The Requirements in Selection of the Path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-20Requirements for JI and JII Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-20Symmetric Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-20Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-21J-Integral Path Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-21requencies and Mode Shapes in a Nonlinear Environment . . . 5-22uckling Analysis in a Nonlinear Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-23elease of Global Prescribed Displacements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-24

  • Part 1 NSTAR / Advanced Dynamics Analysis

    Defining Temperatures Versus Time Relative to a Reference Tempera-ture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-25Modified Central Difference Technique for Dynamic Time Integration5-26

    Advantages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-28Disadvantages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-28

    CMA

    67COSMOSM Advanced Modules 5

    ombination of Force Control and Displacement/Arc-Leng

Related documents